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Category Archives: Arts & Museums

Utah Arts & Museums Awards Arts Education Grants – 24 April 2014

Utah Arts & Museums has granted $66,729 in Arts Education grants to 18 schools and school districts across the state representing 12 different counties. The purpose of Arts Education grants is to provide funding for a comprehensive arts education project with one or more artists and/or access to the services of an artistic company. Arts education projects may be thematic and focus on a particular core area such as math, science, language arts and social studies through dance, theatre, music, storytelling, film/video, visual arts and creative writing. Applicants may also apply for an artist-in-residence to provide schools with one artist in the discipline of the applicant’s choice for a 40-hour residency. The intent of the residency experience is to nurture creation of artistic work by learners.

Arts Education Teacher-Initiated Project grants accounted for $2,500 of the awards. These grants provide opportunities for teachers or administrators to gain knowledge and skills in an artistic discipline of their choice.

“Arts education is crucial for a thriving community,” said Lynnette Hiskey, Director of Utah Arts & Museums. “We’re pleased to offer this financial assistance to help schools and organizations work with professional artists and acquire innovative tools that can be used to reach learners.”

The next deadline for Arts Education grants will be March 1, 2015.

Arts Education Teacher-Initiated Project Grantees

 

Teacher and School

Award Amount

Roland Amendola – Vista Heights Middle School

 $500

Laura Graf – Snow Canyon Middle School

$500

Megan Nelson – Cedar Middle School

$500

Eileen Quintana – Nebo Title VII Indian Education Center

$500

James Rees – Provo High School

$500

 

 

Arts Education Project/Artist-in-Residence Grantees

 

School or School District

Award Amount

Bluff Elementary School

$9,982

Cache County School District

$3,006

Cedar Middle School

$2,856

Flaming Gorge Elementary School

$3,350

Garland Elementary School

$4,000

Hobble Creek Elementary School

 $1,125

Horizonte Instruction & Training Center

 $1,775

Mapleton Elementary School

 $1,750

Midvale Elementary School

 $4,000

Nebo Title VII Indian Education Program

 $6,500

Rees Elementary School

$7,000

Rose Park Academy

$5,000

Tooele County School District

$2,000

Viewmont High School

 $2,500

Whitehorse High School

$9,385

Total Amount Funded for Projects/Residencies

$64,229

 

 


For more information, please contact Laurie Baefsky, Grants Manager, at lbaefsky@utah.gov or call 801.236.7550.

America in the 30s: Prints from the Federal Art Project

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“All Created Equal” by Marjorie Eakin, lithograph, ca. 1935

The prints selected for this exhibit are by artists associated with the California division of the Works Progress Administration (WPA). The WPA was created in 1935 to provide employment, encouragement, and, in part, support for American artists during the Great Depression. A major success of the program was in bringing the language of arts to remote areas of the United States. The project is also credited with initiating graphic arts workshops and commissions for printmakers throughout the nation and sponsoring the production of some 95,000 prints. This printmaking initiative made it possible for artists to produce high-quality multiple versions of their originals. Much of the work produced was democratic in nature and in theme, consistent with the Federal Art Project goals. This exhibition of prints by California artists includes strong images that help the contemporary viewer understand day-to-day life during the Great Depression in the western United States. Among the pieces are examples of both lithography and wood engraving techniques.

Resources

Alice Merrill Horne

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From the Horne Fine Art website:

Born in a log cabin in Fillmore, Utah in 1868, Alice Merrill Horne went on to make extraordinary contributions to her state. The authors of Artists of Utah (1999) describe her as “one of the most active civic and cultural movers that Utah has ever called citizen.”

In 1898, Alice Merrill Horne ran for the 3rd Utah Legislature specifically to advance an arts agenda. Once elected, she authored the legislation to create the Utah Arts Institute (forerunner to the Utah Arts Council, now part of the Utah Division of Arts & Museums). This established the first state-sponsored arts agency in the nation. She established an annual statewide visual arts competition through which paintings would be purchased for a permanent state arts collection. This collection now numbers more than 1,200 pieces and is valued in the millions.

Alice’s support and promotion of early Utah artists took many forms. She assembled 37 collections of Utah art in public schools, so that all children would have direct contact with original art. Over the decades she presented hundreds of fine art exhibitions in various venues, including her own gallery in the Avenues, the Newhouse Hotel, the ZCMI Tiffin Room, and Zion’s Bank. Her efforts were twofold: to provide the artists with income, and to enrich the cultural life of the state.

Beyond her arts agenda, Horne was a civic-minded visionary. She penned legislation setting aside the land grant for the University of Utah. She was an early preservationist and environmentalist, helped save Eagle Gate from demolition, and fought for clean air.

Out of Print

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“Stand of Trees” by Connie Borup

“Out of Print” represents 25 of Utah’s finest professional artists using the medium of printmaking to create lithographic, intaglio, and relief prints. Printmaking is a fine art using varied techniques and materials to produce multiple “original” works of art. Each piece is considered an original, since it is not a reproduction of another work of art, and is technically known as an impression. Works printed from a single plate create an edition; most are signed and numbered to form a limited edition.

The exhibit artists represent a breadth of schools, ranging from the super-realism of Edie Roberson to the Mormon Art and Belief movement of Doug Himes. Lee Deffenbach and Tony Smith studied at the Arts Students League in New York City, and Deffenbach studied in Florence on a Fulbright scholarship. Wulf Eric Barsch received the Prix de Rome from the American Academy in Rome in 1975. The work of Paul H. Davis has been featured at the Corcoran Gallery in Washington, D.C. and the Amerika Haus in Hamburg, Germany. Portrayed in a Life magazine article as a prominent American artist, Doug Snow’s work hangs in collections throughout the United States, including those of the Museums of Modern Art in New York and San Francisco.

Resources

Governor’s Leadership in the Arts Awards To Be Presented at Mountain West Arts Conference – 10 April 2014

Governor Gary R. Herbert and Utah Arts & Museums have announced the recipients of the 2014 Governor’s Leadership in the Arts Awards:

  • Spy Hop Productions, Education Leadership in the Arts Award
  • Shirley Ririe, Co-Founder, Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company, Individual Leadership in the Arts Award
  • City of St. George (Mayor Jon Pike), Community Leadership in the Arts Award
  • Timpanogos Storytelling Institute, Organization Leadership in the Arts Award

“I’m pleased to congratulate this year’s recipients of the Governor’s Leadership in the Arts Awards,” said Governor Herbert. “They have diligently promoted the arts, improving the lives of Utahns with their visionary leadership and dedication. They have bettered the education of our children, the economy of our state, and the quality of life in our communities.”

The Governor’s Leadership in the Arts Awards recipients will be honored at a luncheon during the Mountain West Arts Conference, May 1, 2014, at the Utah Cultural Celebration Center in West Valley City.

Spy Hop Productions’ mission is to mentor young people in the digital media arts to help them find their voices, tell their stories, and be empowered to affect positive change. Founded in 1999, Spy Hop provides more than 1,600 youth between the ages of 7 and 21 with hands-on and mentorship-based programs in film, music, audio, and digital design. The organization has received numerous awards, including the Peabody Award in television broadcasting. Both the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities and the National Endowment for the Arts consider Spy Hop to be one of the country’s leading youth development organizations.

Shirley Ririe is a national leader in the dance world. She served on the committee that developed National Standards for Arts Education K-12 in 1994, as the U.S. delegate to Dance and the Child International, on the National Advisory Committee for Young Audiences, and as a consultant on programs for PBS. During her 35-year performing career, she performed lead roles in choreography by Jose Limon, Helen Tamiris, Alwin Nikolais, Murray Louis, and Merce Cunningham. Ririe has traveled the world as a guest teacher and performer, and has choreographed more than 100 works, both for the company she co-founded, Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company, and other companies.

The City of St. George, under the leadership of Mayor Jon Pike, has actively supported, encouraged, and funded art throughout the community. Through the St. George Arts Council, awards are given to artists and arts organizations. The city has overseen a historic water-walk winding through town, threading its way among sculptures depicting figures involved in the city’s creation. The city owns and operates the St. George Art Museum, sponsors a free outdoor concert series, and hosts the St. George Art Festival, which boasts 110 participating artists and more than 30,000 guests and tourists. St. George recently purchased a historic movie theater, which will be transformed into an arts complex.

The Timpanogos Storytelling Institute began 25 years ago with a festival that drew a few hundred people. Today, the three-day Timpanogos Storytelling Festival surpasses the size of any storytelling festival in the nation — including the National Storytelling Festival — with an audience of more than 28,000 people. The institute offers week-long intensive retreats, helps bring national storytellers to perform for the community several times a year, and holds a national-level storytelling conference each spring. The institute has fostered respect for the art of storytelling on local, state, national, and global levels.

The Mountain West Arts Conference is one of the largest gatherings of the Utah arts community, including artists, administrators, educators, students, and arts supporters. The 8th annual conference will be a day of networking, workshops, and performances. The conference will feature sessions on a number of topics — including youth engagement, grant writing, arts in rural communities, individual giving trends, and hands-on art — from presenters with regional and national expertise. Keynote speaker Doug Borwick, Ph.D. will discuss building sustainable “mission models” for the arts, emphasizing a focus on relationships with the community.

“The conference is a chance to gather, network, celebrate accomplishments, learn new skills, enjoy artistic experiences, and be informed about regional and national issues,” said Lynnette Hiskey, Director of Utah Arts & Museums. “Each year we look forward to it, and each year we come away with a fresh, energized outlook.”

Luncheon reservations and conference registrations can be made online at artsandmuseums.utah.gov. Registration is $95 for the full conference, including the Governor’s Leadership in the Arts Awards luncheon, or $55 for the luncheon alone. Group and student rates are available. Educators can receive points toward Utah Educator’s License recertification. Table sponsorship opportunities are available; call Lynnette Hiskey at 801.236.7551. For more information, visit artsandmuseums.utah.gov or phone 801.236.7555.

“Plural and Partial: Tracing the Intergenerational Self” at Rio Gallery – 20 Mar 2014

Utah Arts & Museums announces the opening of the exhibition “Plural and Partial: Tracing the Intergenerational Self” at the Rio Gallery, located in the historic Rio Grande Depot at 300 S. Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City. The show runs March 28 – April 30, 2014. Gallery hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. An artist reception will be held on April 18 from 6 – 9 p.m. for Salt Lake Gallery Stroll. The gallery will also open April 5 and 19 from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. in conjunction with the Winter Market.

“Plural and Partial: Tracing the Intergenerational Self” is an exhibition of seven contemporary artists — Valerie Atkisson, Liberty Blake, Angela Ellsworth, Jann Haworth, Amy Jorgensen, Annie Kennedy, and Shawn Rossiter — whose work investigates the making of identity that draws upon the plurality of the self and the span of partial influence that is made from generation to generation.

These artists examine the self through an intergenerational lens; in particular, the relationship between mother and daughter. Some mothers are both of blood and religious inheritance, such as Angela Ellsworth’s reference to her ancestor Eliza R. Snow. Some mothers are political, such as the suffragist and cultural references found in Amy Jorgensen’s “Well Behaved Women.” Some artists are linked more intimately to their own mothers, such as Valerie Atkisson and Annie Kennedy. Jann Haworth’s work is varied and at time makes reference to those visual memories we inherit, either through art history or personal experience. For Liberty Blake and Shawn Rossiter, their work negotiates the exchange that is part of making work within a cooperative, as a team, straddling two individual voices, two separate countries. Incidentally, two artists included in the exhibition are mother and daughter — Jann Haworth and Liberty Blake.

Works in collage, cut paper and fabric, sewn sculpture, and video are all used to explore the ways we imprint ourselves on one another and the many ways we consistently appropriate our inherited identities into ourselves. “We’re excited to be able to exhibit such a wide breadth of media from fantastic artists exploring a topic that is relevant to all of us,” said Utah Arts & Museums Director Lynnette Hiskey.

Ashlei Havili of American Fork High School Wins State Poetry Out Loud Finals – 13 Mar 2014

Nick Markham of Judge Memorial Catholic High School named runner-up

Ashlei Havili of American Fork High School took home top honors from the state finals for the Poetry Out Loud National Recitation Contest, presented by Utah Arts & Museums on Wednesday, March 12, 2014, at co-host Westminster College’s Vieve Gore Concert Hall in the Jewett Center for the Performing Arts. Havili will receive $200 and travel expenses to represent Utah in the national championship April 29 and 30 in Washington, D.C. Her school will receive a $500 stipend for the purchase of poetry books. Runner-up Nick Markham of Judge Memorial Catholic High School will receive $100, with $200 for his school library. Poetry Out Loud will award a $20,000 college scholarship to the national champion.

Approximately 5,042 students from 43 high schools and 16 school districts across Utah participated in Poetry Out Loud activities and competed in school and regional competitions. Regional competitions were held in Gunnison, Provo, Roosevelt, St. George, South Jordan and Woods Cross. At the Vieve Gore Concert Hall, students recited works they selected from an anthology of nearly 600 classic and contemporary poems. Students competing included:

Ashlei Havili, American Fork High School, American Fork
Emily Woolsey, Beaver High School, Beaver
Rose Peckham, East Hollywood High School, West Valley City
Nick Markham, Judge Memorial Catholic High School, Salt Lake City
Mitchell Asper, North Sevier High School, Salina
Mason Duncan II, Union High School, Roosevelt

This was the second time participating in Poetry Out Loud for state champion Havili. She prepared by reading “a lot of poems; probably more than I’ll ever read again,” she said. “I chose ones where I could see myself in them — they really captured me.” Her advice to future competitors: “Never stop reading, and never stop believing that you can do something great.”

Judges were Ben Gunsberg, Assistant Professor of Creative Writing and English Education at Utah State University; David Dynak, Director of the Center for the Arts and Education at Westminster College; Ashley Seitz Kramer, Assistant Dean of Arts and Sciences at Westminster College; and Larry Shumway, former Utah Superintendent of Public Instruction. The judges used a comprehensive scoring rubric provided by the competition sponsors, the National Endowment for the Arts and the Poetry Foundation. Competitors were judged on their physical presence, voice and articulation, dramatic appropriateness of the performance, level of poem difficulty, evidence of poem understanding, and overall performance. In addition, accuracy judges scored the students on how precisely they recited the poems.

“These students are so amazing,” said Lynnette Hiskey, Utah Arts & Museums Director. “Their captivating performances of these literary masterworks are a thrill to watch. We’re very proud of them, and each one deserves our heartfelt congratulations.”

Utah has had five finalists in the national top ten. Last year, state champion Devin Jones of West Jordan High School received an honorable mention and $1,000 at the national finals. In 2012, senior MarKaye Hassan of Logan High School took third place in the national finals and received a $5,000 award. She was also invited to return to Washington, D.C., to recite at the National Book Festival. In 2008, Skyline High School senior Madison Niermeyer also placed third at the national competition and received a $5,000 scholarship award. Niermeyer was contacted by noted Beat poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti to congratulate her on her recitation of his poem I Am Waiting.

The state finals were a festive event, with KUED-TV Director of Production Ken Verdoia serving as the emcee, and the band Color Animal providing music during the breaks. Winners were congratulated by Department of Heritage and Arts Executive Director Julie Fisher. The audience was treated to poetry recitations by Utah Poet Laureate Lance Larsen; poet Shanan Ballam; Utah County Poetry Out Loud Regional Coordinator Justin Kennington; and student Karlei Havili.

The 2014 Poetry Out Loud National Finals will be at the Lisner Auditorium, The George Washington University, April 30 (semifinals will take place on April 29). The semifinals and finals will be webcast live at arts.gov.

Poetry Out Loud, presented in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts and the Poetry Foundation, is part of a national program that encourages high school students to learn about great poetry through memorization, performance, and competition. Poetry Out Loud seeks to foster the next generation of literary readers across the nation by capitalizing on trends in poetry recitation and performance. The program builds on the resurgence of poetry as an oral art form by inviting the dynamic aspects of slam poetry, the spoken word, and theatre into the English classroom. Through Poetry Out Loud, students master public-speaking skills, build self-confidence, and learn about their literary heritage. For more details regarding Utah’s Poetry Out Loud activities, contact the POL Team via email or call 801.533.5760.

“Mark by Mark” Opens in Alice Gallery – 12 Mar 2014

Utah Arts & Museums announces the opening of the exhibition “Mark by Mark” in the Alice Gallery, located inside the Glendinning Mansion. The show runs from March 14 to May 9, 2014. Gallery hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. The Glendinning Mansion is located at 617 E. South Temple in Salt Lake City. An opening reception will be held on March 21 from 6 to 9 p.m. for the Salt Lake Gallery Stroll.

This exhibition consists of new works by Al Denyer, Lydia Gravis and K Stevenson. Employing one of the artist’s most elemental tools – the mark – these three artists, through accumulated mark-making, conjure the complexities and ambiguities found in both personal and collective experience. All three artists stake out individual territories in which the polarities of this art-making process, from the singular gesture to the densely layered, examine formal and conceptual commonalities.

From intuitive marking to referencing geographical and biological forms, these works layer a variety of 2-D media to create imagery that simultaneously interpret the micro and macro – and interior and exterior – perspectives. Using the material bounds of traditional drawing, the artists strategically meander, map and expand both our descriptive and interpretive understanding of these physical and psychological terrains.

“Using some of the oldest forms of mark-making,” said Utah Arts & Museums Director Lynnette Hiskey, “these artists do a stunning job of creating work that brings these more traditional media to the forefront of contemporary art-making, both formally and conceptually.”

The Rio and Alice galleries were established as a service to Utah artists. They provide free venues for emerging as well as established artists to collaborate on exhibits and engage the community through art-making and dialogue. For more information on exhibitions and other program opportunities, visit visualartsutah.org.

Utah Arts & Museums Announces 2014 Visual Arts Fellows – 10 Mar 2014

Utah Arts & Museums has announced two Visual Arts Fellowship recipients for 2014: Wendy Wischer and David Wolske, both of Salt Lake City. This year’s juror, Nora Burnett Abrams, associate curator at the MCA (Museum of Contemporary Art) Denver, said, “The two artists selected for this fellowship offer distinctive bodies of work that differ greatly from each other. Both of these artists develop their work with a sensitivity and curiosity to explore each medium as far as they might take it. While one works with the natural environment and the other works with the basic elements of our language, each artist is turning to (as a source of inspiration and for subject matter) something universal and fundamental to all of us—and helping us to see that in a fresh, new way.”

Wischer and Wolske will each receive a $10,000 award. “We congratulate Wendy Wischer and David Wolske on being awarded these fellowships,” said Lynnette Hiskey, Director of Utah Arts & Museums. “The talent and creativity of Utah’s visual artists is always impressive. We look forward to seeing the future work of these two artists.”

A record 165 professional artists applied for this year’s award. “The applicants presented a rich and varied range of creative production. Taken together, these artists demonstrated key values that are fundamental to a thriving artistic community: experimentation, ambition, reflection and great vision. Utah is home to painters, sculptors, printmakers and photographers; and it is also home to risk-takers and complex thinkers,” said Abrams.

Wendy Wischer is an assistant professor at the University of Utah in the art/art history department. She received an MFA from Florida State University and a BFA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Wischer creates work in a variety of media, from sculptural objects to installations, video and public works. Much of the artwork is based on blurring the separation between the intrinsic history of working with nature and the cutting edge of New Genre and New Media. “Wischer works with immaterial elements like light and finds elaborate ways to make them concrete. She creates large-scale installations inspired in part by the natural landscape. Harnessing the majesty of this terrain is an ambitious aim, and she achieves this without falling into cliché or stereotype,” noted Abrams.

David Wolske is an artist, graphic designer, typographer and creative director for the Book Arts Program and Red Butte Press at the J. Willard Marriott Library at The University of Utah.  Of his work, he said, “By employing moveable type and letterpress printing, I revive and repurpose the materials and techniques of a once-thriving commercial industry to investigate the coevolution of language and communication technologies. I employ layering, rotating, bending and twisting in an attempt to subvert the inherent perpendicularity of the medium.” Added Abrams, “Wolske works with one of the oldest forms of art-making, and his relief prints demonstrate that there is strength and beauty when working in a more traditional medium. But he also pushes the medium of printmaking in exciting new ways, urging it to interact with different technologies and experimenting with the different possibilities he might produce.”

Wischer said, “As a recent resident of Utah, I am honored and delighted to receive the Utah Visual Arts Fellowship. This fellowship provides an invaluable opportunity to artists, and I look forward to its resonance within my own practice.” Wolske added, “I’m so grateful to Utah Arts & Museums and to juror Nora Burnett Abrams. It’s truly an honor to join the prestigious company of Visual Arts Fellows, and I look forward to contributing to Utah’s vibrant arts dialogue.”

Visual Arts Program Manager Felicia Baca said, “We are delighted in Ms. Abrams’ selections for this year’s fellows. These artists are making important contributions to our culture by facilitating critical dialogue and understanding about the world through the visual arts. Their contributions to our state resonate on many levels; the fellows often bring important national attention to our state, adding to the cultural vitality of Utah, which has implications for education, economics and an engaged citizenry.”

More information on the artists and the Visual Arts Fellowship Program can be found at http://visualartsfellowship.org.

Poetry Out Loud State Finals on March 12 – 4 Mar 2014

Utah Arts & Museums announces the state finals for Poetry Out Loud, the national poetry recitation competition. The state finals will be held on March 12, 2014, at 7 p.m., Vieve Gore Concert Hall in the Jewett Center for the Performing Arts at co-host Westminster College. The Poetry Out Loud Utah state finals event is free and open to the public. The champion will go to Washington, D.C., April 29 and 30 to represent Utah in the national finals and compete to win a $20,000 scholarship.

Approximately 4,563 students from 39 high schools around the state participated in Poetry Out Loud activities (some schools included the entire student body) and competed in school and regional competitions. Regional competitions were held in Gunnison, Provo, Roosevelt, St. George, South Jordan and Woods Cross.

At the Jewett Center, students will recite works they selected from an anthology of nearly 600 classic and contemporary poems. Students from the following schools will compete in the finals:

American Fork High School, American Fork
Beaver High School, Beaver
East Hollywood High School, West Valley City
Judge Memorial High School, Salt Lake City
North Sevier High School, Salina
Union High School, Roosevelt

“These outstanding students who participate in Poetry Out Loud really immerse themselves in the poems and get a chance to improve their public-speaking skills,” said Lynnette Hiskey, Utah Arts & Museums Director. “The final state competition is an exciting evening, and the state champion also honors us with a recitation at the Mountain West Arts Conference and Governor’s Leadership in the Arts Awards luncheon in May.”

The evening will be emceed by Ken Verdoia, and there will be an appearance by Utah Poet Laureate Lance Larsen.

Utah has had five finalists in the national top ten. Last year, state champion Devin Jones of West Jordan High School received an honorable mention and $1,000 at the national finals. In 2012, senior MarKaye Hassan of Logan High School took third place in the national finals and received a $5,000 award. She was also invited to return to Washington, D.C., to recite at the National Book Festival. In 2008, Skyline High School senior Madison Niermeyer also placed third at the national competition and received a $5,000 scholarship award. Niermeyer was contacted by noted Beat poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti to congratulate her on her recitation of his poem I Am Waiting.

The 2014 Poetry Out Loud National Finals will be at the Lisner Auditorium, The George Washington University, April 30 (semifinals will take place on April 29). The semifinals and finals will be webcast live at arts.gov.

Poetry Out Loud, presented in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts and the Poetry Foundation, is part of a national program that encourages high school students to learn about great poetry through memorization, performance, and competition. Poetry Out Loud seeks to foster the next generation of literary readers across the nation by capitalizing on trends in poetry recitation and performance. The program builds on the resurgence of poetry as an oral art form by inviting the dynamic aspects of slam poetry, the spoken word, and theatre into the English classroom. Through Poetry Out Loud, students master public-speaking skills, build self-confidence, and learn about their literary heritage.