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Call for Papers and Session Proposals

Thank you for your interest in submitting a proposal for the 62nd Annual Utah State History Conference, Utah Technology Through Time 

Technology has helped people live and thrive in Utah for over 12,000 years. In order to understand and remember the development of technology in Utah, this year’s Utah State History conference will focus on Utah Technology through Time.

The conference will be tentatively organized into three tracks:

  • The emergence of Utah’s high tech industry, 1950s–present
  • Utah industry, technology, and enterprise in the 19th and 20th centuries
  • Prehistoric technology in the region of Utah

Utah State History invites the public, scholars, students, and organizations to submit presentation proposals for conference sessions to be held on September 26 at The Leonardo, Utah’s Science and Technology Museum.  In addition, some sessions may be posted online. Individuals and organizations may address any topic relating to Utah history.  However, priority will be given to proposals that explore the many facets of technological innovation throughout Utah’s human past. Proposals can include papers, podcasts, presentations, panels or sessions.

Proposals should be submitted by May 2, 2014. Each proposal must include:

  • A one-page (300-word limit) abstract detailing the presentation or session and its significance
  • Bio for each participant (100-word limit)
  • Audio-visual requirements
  • Your permission, if selected, for media interviews, session audio/visual recordings, and electronic sessions or podcasts during or in advance of the conference.  The Division of State History will use these recording in its effort to meet its history- related mission.
  • Contact information of the presenter(s)


National Register Nominations | April 2014

In April 2014, the Board of State History, for the Utah Division of State History, will review five (5) nominations to the National Register. These nominations are:

The Board of State History meets on April 17, 2014. These meetings are public. To view or print the meeting agenda, please visit the Board of State History.

April 17, 2014

Back to the Board of State History
Download the agenda as a word doc

AGENDA

BOARD OF STATE HISTORY MEETING

Thursday, April 17, 2014
12:00 Noon – 4:00pm

Rio Grande Depot, Board Room, 300 South Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City, UT 84101

Noon Working Lunch for Board members, hosted by State History
1:00 p.m. Board Meeting Begins
Welcome – Michael Homer
Legislative Update and National History Day – Julie Fisher, Wendy Rex-Atzet
ACTION ITEMS:

  1. Approval of the January 16, 2014 Minutes – Michael Homer
  2. National Register Nominations – Cory Jensen, Lori Hunsaker, Chris Merritt
    a) Brooks Arcade Removal Request
    b) International Peace Gardens
    c) St. Christopher’s Episcopal Mission (additional documentation)
    d) David and Evinda Madsen House
    e) Tie Cutting Industry of the North Slope of the Uinta Mountains, Utah (1867-1940s)
    Multiple Property Documentation Form
    f) Doggy Door Tie Cutter Cabin
    g) Nine Mile Canyon (for comment only)
  3. Administrative Rules – Alycia Aldrich
    a) Procedures for Emergency Meetings
    b) Procedures for Electronic Meetings
  4. Deaccession of the Guilaume Seignac Painting – Doug Misner
  5. John William James Family Charitable Bequest Policy Update – Doug Misner
  6. Fellows and Honorary Life Members Proposed Revisions – Brad Westwood
DISCUSSION ITEMS:

  1. State History Quarterly Program Accomplishments – Brad Westwood
  2. 62nd Annual Utah State History Conference, Sept. 25-27th – Brad Westwood
  3. Board Appointments – Mike Homer
  4. Senior State Historian Position (Digital Editor) and Associate Director Position – Brad Westwood
OTHER BUSINESS
4:00pm ADJOURN
 NEXT MEETING  July 17, 2014

Archaeology Week 2014 Events


Utah Archaeology Week celebrates Utah’s rich archaeological and cultural resources with a week of lectures and hands-on learning.

Statewide events include:

  • Open house at the Rio Grande Depot with educational activities for kids
  • Annual poster contest
  • Lectures and paper presentations
  • Tours of archaeological sites

Please note: Updates occur regularly, but may take up to 48 hours to appear.

Please note: Jumps may land slightly below their marker. We are sorry for the inconvenience.


Jump to County:

Beaver County

Fire, Frisco and Furnaces – Tour of the Charcoal Making Industry at Historic Frisco, Beaver County

CITY: Frisco (Meet in Cedar City)
DATE & TIME: Saturday, May 10, 8am to 2pm
LOCATION: Meet at Frontier Homestead State Park in Cedar City
INFORMATION: Samantha Kirkley, slkirkley@gmail.com
SPONSORS: BLM, Frontier Homestead State Park
ADMISSION: Free

This is a BLM guided tour of the historic town of Frisco in Beaver County. Participants will be
able to see charcoal kilns, ruins of houses and businesses, town cemetery, and wherever else
the guide may lead. It will be a fun day of discovery. All ages welcome. Please prepare by
wearing good shoes, sunscreen, and possibly a hat. You will also want to bring lunch, water,
and a camera. While some carpooling may be possible, please prepare to drive your own
vehicle. High clearance vehicle required! We will be meeting at the Frontier Homestead State
Park in Cedar City before 8am. Those who are coming from another county can meet at 9:15
a.m. at the Carbonate Gulch Road and Hwy 21, 12.7 miles west of junction Hwys 21 and 257
in Milford and 1.1 miles east of Frisco Summit. While not required, attending the Wednesday
presentation at the Homestead will greatly enhance your experience. No public restrooms
available at the site.

Cache County

Utah Archaeology and Native History at the Museum of Anthropology

City: Logan
Date & time: Saturday, May 10, 10am-2pm
Location: USU Museum of Anthropology, USU Campus, Old Main Building, Room 252
Information: elizabeth.sutton@usu.edu, (435)797-7545, anthromuseum.usu.edu
Sponsor: USU Museum of Anthropology and USU Native American Student Council
Admission: Free

“Utah Archaeology and Native History” This is a FREE event at our museum designed for a family audience. We will offer hands-on activities with tours of our Great Basin exhibits and artifact displays,atlatl throwing, making pottery, and Native Arts and Crafts.

Carbon County

Utah State University Eastern Prehistoric Museum Family Activity Day

CITY: Price
DATE & TIME: Saturday, May 3, (Free admission to Museum 9am to 5pm)
LOCATION: USU Eastern Prehistoric Museum, 155 East Main St.
INFORMATION: Dr. Tim Riley, tim.riley@usu.edu; usueastern.edu/museum/
SPONSOR: Utah State University Eastern, Prehistoric Museum
ADMISSION: Free

Come join the Prehistoric Museum for a day of fun for the whole family, including numerous hands-on activities and educational events. Admission to the museum is free all day, with children’s activities from 10am to 2pm. Bring the whole family!


Prehistoric Artisans: The Role of Artistic Expression among the Fremont

CITY: Price
DATE & TIME: Tuesday, May 6, 7-8pm
LOCATION: USU Eastern Prehistoric Museum (upstairs), 155 East Main St.
INFORMATION: Dr. Tim Riley, tim.riley@usu.eduusueastern.edu/museum/
SPONSOR: Utah State University Eastern, Prehistoric Museum
ADMISSION: Free

Dr. Tim Riley will speak on artistic expression amongst the Fremont peoples of Utah, at this free event at the USU Eastern Prehistoric Museum.


The Mouth That Roared: Acrocanthosaurus inside and out

CITY: Price
DATE & TIME: Friday, May 9, 7-8pm
LOCATION: USU Eastern Prehistoric Museum (upstairs), 155 East Main St.
INFORMATION: Dr. Tim Riley, tim.riley@usu.eduusueastern.edu/museum/
SPONSOR: Utah State University Eastern, Prehistoric Museum
ADMISSION: Free

Dr. Ken Carpenter, the Director and Curator of Paleontology at the Prehis-
toric Museum & Associate Vice Chancellor at Utah State University.


Art Gallery Exhibition Opening – Terry Willis, Chasing The Light – II

CITY: Price
DATE & TIME: Friday, May 10, 9am-5pm
LOCATION: USU Eastern Prehistoric Museum (upstairs), The museum art gallery.
INFORMATION: (435) 613-5060 or (800) 817-9949
SPONSOR: Utah State University Eastern, Prehistoric Museum
ADMISSION: General admission rates apply. For Prices visit: usueastern.edu/museum/visit.htm

Daggett County

History and Archaeology of the Jarvie Ranch in Daggett County, Utah

DATE & TIME: Saturday, May 17, 10am to 3pm
LOCATION: Jarvie Ranch
INFORMATION: BLM Ranger for Jarvie Ranch (435) 885-3307
SPONSOR: Vernal Field Office, Bureau of Land Management
ADMISSION: Free

Jarvie Days is an all-day program that provides an opportunity for the public to experience life-ways of the inhabitants of Browns Park of NE Utah during the late 18th Park area, there were several cultural interactions that were taking place. Beyond the settlers that inhabited the area year-round, there were seasonal gatherings of Mountain Men and Native Americans. To represent these various cultures, the Vernal Field Office is planning on having several opportunities for the public to have hands-on experiences that include various historic activities of the period. These include, but are not limited to, rope making, candle making, and various prehistoric technologies such as petroglyph recreation and atlatl throwing. Also planned are multiple re-enactors that represent the
Mountain Men Rendezvous, Native American Flintknapping, Blacksmithing, and Wagon Teamsters. It will be a fun filled day of learning for the entire family with food vendors available.
century. During this period in the Browns.

Emery County

The Tusher Diversion and Hastings Ranch and Green River’s Agricultural Industry

CITY: Green River
DATE & TIME: Thursday, May 8, 7-830pm
LOCATION: John Wesley Powell Museum, 1765 E. Main St.
INFORMATION: Grant Carlos Smith, grant.smith@ut.usda.gov
SPONSOR: National Resources Conservation Service and John Wesley Powell Museum
ADMISSION: FREE

Presentation will cover the history and importance of the Tusher Diversion and the Hastings Ranch in the development of the Green River agricultural industry. As part of that meeting, NRCS and the John Wesley Powell museum is inviting the public to bring photos, articles, journal entries, and/or anecdotes about the Tusher Diversion so that its history can be better understood and appreciated. NRCS will have scanners and copiers at hand for those that wish to share.


Movie Night at the Museum

CITY: Castle Dale
DATE & TIME: Thursday, May 8 at 6pm
LOCATION: Museum of the San Rafael, 70 North 100 East, Castle Dale, UT
INFORMATION: museum@emery.utah.gov, 435-381-5252
SPONSOR: Museum of the San Rafael
ADMISSION: Free

Please join us for a fun and entertaining evening of watching the animated movie, The Croods, at the museum. The movie is rated “PG”. After their cave is destroyed, a caveman family must trek through an unfamiliar fantastical world with the help of an inventive boy. Bring your own pillows and blankets. Popcorn and water provided!


Family day at the Museum

CITY: Castle Dale
DATE & TIME: Saturday May 10, 10am-2pm
LOCATION: Museum of the San Rafael, 70 North 100 East, Castle Dale, UT
INFORMATION: museum@emery.utah.gov, 435-381-5252
SPONSOR: Museum of the San Rafael
ADMISSION: Free

Please join us for a day of family activities at the Museum of the San Rafael with activities for all ages.

Grand County

Aliens, Dinosaurs, and Lost Treasure: Hijacking Southern Utah’s Cultural Heritage for Nefarious Purposes

CITY: Moab
DATE & TIME: Thursday, May 8, 6-7pm
LOCATION: Moab Information Center, 25 East Center Street
INFORMATION: Mary Thomas, crmfilesearch@gmail.com
SPONSOR: Moab Information Center
ADMISSION: Free

Southern Utah’s rich cultural history holds many mysteries. These mysteries slowly reveal themselves to archaeologists, historians, and other scholars as they undertake careful, thoughtful, and often tedious research based on empirical observations, fact checking, and the scientific method. Unfortunately, many of these investigations are overshadowed in popular culture by questionable claims made by pseudoscience practitioners who manipulate facts, make unverifiable claims, or use weakly piecemealed arguments to twist simple observations to fit into preconceived notions of their preferred realities. Using examples drawn from Southern Utah, claims for creation, alien visitation, hidden treasure, and certain infamous missing person case are scrutinized through common sense, logic, and the scientific method.

Iron County

Archaeology Day

CITY: Cedar City
DATE & TIME: Saturday, May 3, 10am to 3pm
LOCATION: Frontier Homestead State Park Museum (635 N. Main), Cedar City
SPONSORS: Southern Utah University, Bureau of Land Management-Cedar office, Project Archaeology, Frontier Homestead State Park, and the Cowboy Smokehouse.
INFORMATION: Samantha Kirkley, slkirkley@gmail.com
ADMISSION: $5/family

This is the 3rd annual kick-off event for Archaeology Week in southern Utah. We will have various activities and demonstrations for all ages. Bring the family and learn how to throw an atlatl, grind corn, build an ancient dwelling, make a prehistoric duck decoy, and more. Also, bring your interesting artifacts from home and “Ask an Archaeologist” to give you more information. Boy Scouts can earn Indian Lore badge by participating. Park entrance fee is $1.50 per person or $5.00 per family.


SUU Archaeology Repository Tours

CITY: Cedar City
DATE & TIME: Monday, May 5, 6 to 8pm
LOCATION: Room 101-A, West basement door, Electronic Learning Center (ELC), SUU, Cedar City
SPONSOR: Southern Utah University
INFORMATION: Samantha Kirkley, slkirkley@gmail.com
ADMISSION: Free

This is a rare and wonderful opportunity available to the public to see and touch real artifacts from various archaeological sites. Professional archaeologist and curator, Barbara Frank, will be offering the tours every half hour and answering questions. Directional signs will be on the doors of the ELC to ensure that you arrive. All (well-behaved) ages welcome! Free event.


Fire, Frisco and Furnaces: Presentations on the Charcoal Making Industry at Historic Frisco, Beaver County

CITY: Cedar City
DATE & TIME: Wednesday, May 7, 7 to 8 pm
LOCATION: Frontier Homestead State Park Museum (635 N. Main), Cedar City
SPONSORS: BLM, Frontier Homestead State Park
INFORMATION: Samantha Kirkley, slkirkley@gmail.com
ADMISSION: Free
Professionals, Doug Page and Nate Thomas, will offer public presentations on historic mining in southern Utah and the latest discoveries at historic Frisco, Utah. Those interested in taking the tour Saturday won’t want to miss these presentations. Free event.


Parowan Gap Tour

CITY: Cedar City
DATE & TIME: Friday, May 9, 6:30 to 8:30 pm
LOCATION: Meet at Frontier Homestead State Park (635 N. Main) or at Parowan Gap
SPONSORS: BLM, Frontier Homestead State Park
INFORMATION: Samantha Kirkley, slkirkley@gmail.com
ADMISSION: Free

Come see one of the largest and most spectacular collections of rock art in Utah! This tour will be guided by BLM archaeologist, Nate Thomas. While some carpooling may be possible, please prepare to drive your own vehicle. We will meet at the Frontier Homestead State Park and be ready to depart at 6:30 pm. You may also meet the group at the Gap. The petroglyphs are visible from the road, so no rigorous gear should be necessary and wheel chairs should be able to access most of the area. Water, binoculars, and a camera are suggested. No public restrooms yet available at this site.

Salt-Lake1

Utah Archaeology Week Open House

CITY: Salt Lake City
DATE & TIME: Saturday, May 3, 10am-2pm
LOCATION: Rio Grande Building, 300 S Rio Grande Street, SLC
INFORMATION: history.utah.gov, or Like us on Facebook UtahStateAntiquitiesSection
SPONSOR: Utah Division of State History and partners
ADMISSION: Free

Experience Utah’s rich cultural heritage by participating in hands-on archaeological activities. Grinding corn, throwing spears, and face painting are just a few of the exciting events for kids and families.

Sevier County

Archaeology of Clear Creek Canyon and Fremont Indian State Park

DATE & TIME: Thursday, May 15, 6-8pm
LOCATION: Fremont Indian State Park & Museum, 3820 Clear Creek Canyon Rd.
INFORMATION: donmerritt@utah.gov; (435) 527-4631
SPONSOR: Fremont Indian State Park & Friends of the Fremont
ADMISSION: Free

Archaeologists Richard Talbot and Asa Nielson will present on the archaeology of Fremont Indian State Park, and provide a unique perspective on those archaeological excavations and research as they were members of the original team to do the work in the 1980s before founding of the State Park. Get an insider’s perspective on the archaeology of the canyon! There is no fee for the lecture or access to the museum from 6pm to 8pm, and everyone is welcome.

Utah County

Museum of Peoples and Cultures Block Party

CITY: Provo
DATE & TIME: Saturday, May 10, 11am to 3pm
LOCATION: Museum of Peoples and Cultures, 100 E 700 N
INFORMATION: mpc@byu.edu; (801) 422-0020
SPONSOR: Brigham Young University, Museum of Peoples and Culture
ADMISSION: Free

Come join the Museum of Peoples and Culture for an archaeological Block Party! The theme this year is “Technology through Time” and there will five different stations (Weapons & Hunting, Food Preparation, Clothing, Building Materials, and Games and Entertainment) and each station will have three different cultures in Utah represented as well as a game. Refreshments will be provided to all attendees!

Washington County

Archaeological Excavation Tour

CITY: ST. George
DATE & TIME: Saturday, May 3, 10 to 11am
LOCATION: Meet at Crosby Family Confluence Park
SPONSORS: Local Professional Archaeologists
INFORMATION: Samantha Kirkley, slkirkley@gmail.com
ADMISSION: Free

Come and receive a guided tour of an archaeological excavation currently in progress in St.George. All are welcome to meet at the Crosby Family Confluence Park located just south of the Dixie Center on Convention Center Drive prior to 10 am, when you will be guided to the site by a professional archaeologist. This is a rare and educational opportunity that you don’t want to miss!

Please note: Jumps may land slightly below their marker. We are sorry for the inconvenience.

Link

Utah Archaeology Week 2014

During Utah Archaeology Week you can learn about Utah’s past and have fun while doing it.

Statewide events include:

  • Open house at the Rio Grande Depot with educational activities for kids
  • Annual poster contest
  • Lectures and paper presentations
  • Tours of archaeological sites

Navajo

The Navajos moved into Utah and were in the Four Corner area by AD 1400. Although the Navajo, who spoke an Athabaskan language as opposed to Numic, were Numic contemporaries, they weren’t amicable.

The Navajo presently still reside in the southeastern corner of Utah and the Four Corner area. More than half of the population of San Juan County, Utah is Navajo – most living south of the San Juan River.

Because the Navajo archaeology dates to times when there is written documentation about their early practices and ways of life archaeologists consider them in the category of “historic,” and not “prehistoric.”

Numic

Approximately 8,000 years ago, the climate was getting drier and warmer and lifestyles had to change. Archaeologists call the culture of this time the Archaic culture.

Archaic people were hunters and gathers, usually moving around as they followed food sources. Their shelters were usually caves or wickiups made from brush.

People at this time were making baskets, which they used for collecting seeds, pinyon nuts, and other plants. They also used baskets for cooking.

For hunting, Archaic people made several kinds of spear points. An atlatl, or spear-thrower, helped them hurl small spears faster and farther. But they also would have eaten insects.

The Archaic people left behind rock art, and you can see echoes of their lives in the Barrier Canyon style of rock art which can be found in sites around the San Rafael Swell and Canyonlands National Park.About 500 years ago the Ancestral Puebloan people abandoned their settlements in Utah. They had also established areas in Colorado that were abandoned at this time. The reason for the mass exodus out of this area is still unknown, but there are a variety of hypotheses including climate change or cultural change.

Anasazi or Ancestral Puebloan

Approximately 8,000 years ago, the climate was getting drier and warmer and lifestyles had to change. Archaeologists call the culture of this time the Archaic culture.

Archaic people were hunters and gathers, usually moving around as they followed food sources. Their shelters were usually caves or wickiups made from brush.

People at this time were making baskets, which they used for collecting seeds, pinyon nuts, and other plants. They also used baskets for cooking.

For hunting, Archaic people made several kinds of spear points. An atlatl, or spear-thrower, helped them hurl small spears faster and farther. But they also would have eaten insects.

The Archaic people left behind rock art, and you can see echoes of their lives in the Barrier Canyon style of rock art which can be found in sites around the San Rafael Swell and Canyonlands National Park.About 500 years ago the Ancestral Puebloan people abandoned their settlements in Utah. They had also established areas in Colorado that were abandoned at this time. The reason for the mass exodus out of this area is still unknown, but there are a variety of hypotheses including climate change or cultural change.

Fremont

Approximately 8,000 years ago, the climate was getting drier and warmer and lifestyles had to change. Archaeologists call the culture of this time the Archaic culture.

Archaic people were hunters and gathers, usually moving around as they followed food sources. Their shelters were usually caves or wickiups made from brush.

People at this time were making baskets, which they used for collecting seeds, pinyon nuts, and other plants. They also used baskets for cooking.

For hunting, Archaic people made several kinds of spear points. An atlatl, or spear-thrower, helped them hurl small spears faster and farther. But they also would have eaten insects.

The Archaic people left behind rock art, and you can see echoes of their lives in the Barrier Canyon style of rock art which can be found in sites around the San Rafael Swell and Canyonlands National Park.