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2015 Annual History Conference Session 4 Abstracts

3:30 – 5:00 p.m.

Religion and Race: Evaluating Religion of a Different Color: Race and the Mormon Struggle for Whiteness (Room 101)

  • Panel: Brad Westwood (chair), David Rich Lewis, Michael H. MacKay, Paul Reeve, and LaShawn Williams-Schultz

Diversity and Sport (Room 102)

  • Joseph Soderberg: Wicket Mormons and Cricket Gentiles: Cultural Imperialism in Utah’s Sporting Past
  • Intermountain Cricket League Exhibition

Religious and Cultural Difference (Room 104)

  • Will Bagley (chair)
  • Isaiah Jones: The Gentile Stays in Cache Valley
  • Craig L. Foster and Newell G. Bringhurst: Two Changing Faces of Fundamentalist Mormonism: Rulon and Warren Jeffs

Native-White Interaction in Nineteenth-Century Utah  (Room 105)

  • David Grua (chair)
  • Wendy Simmons Johnson: An Underground Store, the Skull Valley Goshute, and Red Ink:  Contact Period in Rush Valley
  • Hadyn B. Call: Kidnapped and Purchased: Piecing Together the Story of Ruth Piede Call Davids—a Paiute Indian
  • Jim Keyes: Showdown in the canyons: History of interaction between early cattle ranchers and Native Americans in southeastern Utah.

Exploring Utah’s Multicultural Past through Oral History (Suite A)

  • Panel:
    • Jodi Graham (chair)
    • Randy Williams: Cache Valley Refugee Voices
    • Deborah M. George: New Zion Community Advocates, Inc.
    • Sarah Langsdon Singh

 

Religion and Race: Evaluating Religion of a Different Color: Race and the Mormon Struggle for Whiteness
Panel Abstract
In Religion of a Different Color: Race and the Mormon Struggle for Whiteness, Paul Reeve explores nineteenth-century representations of Mormonism as a marginalized group physically different from the white Protestant majority. Reeve additionally chronicles Mormonism’s controversial history of race and blackness. Panelists will take a critical look at Reeve’s arguments within the context of race and religion in Utah and the United States.
Moderator
Brad Westwood, Director of the Utah Division of State History

Panelists
David Rich Lewis, Professor of History at Utah State University
Paul Reeve, Associate Professor of History at University of Utah. His Religion of a Different Color: Race and the Mormon Struggle for Whiteness was published by the Oxford University Press.
Jacob Rugh, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Brigham Young University
LaShawn Williams-Schultz teaches African-American culture at Salt Lake Community College


Joseph Soderberg has a bachelor’s degree in history from Utah State University and a Certificate of International Relations. He lived in Wales for a year and studied at the University of Wales at Swansea. Soderberg has worked in the on-demand publishing business and done freelance genealogical and historical research. He has lived in St. Petersburg, Russia, and Guangzhou, China, while teaching English in those locations. He has presented papers on Utah, American, and Mormon history. He is currently working with John Peterson as his research assistant on his forthcoming book “Brigham’s Bastion,” a history of Pipe Spring National Monument.


Isaiah Jones Bio
In his senior year of high school, Jones was offered a full-ride scholarship to play football at Colorado Mesa University, where he played for a year before transferring to play football at USU. During his junior year of college, he took a class from Dr. Phil Barlow, where, he found his new passion in theology, history, and religious studies. His research interest includes infant baptism, race, African religion, and Eastern Orthodoxy. His thesis is titled “The Mystical Union of Infant Baptism: How Baptist Contributed to the Idea of Race by Their Rejection of Infant Baptism.”

Newell G. Bringhurst Abstract
This paper examines the metamorphosis of Rulon Timpson Jeffs from a devout, active member of the LDS Church to his emergence as Prophet-President of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints—most remembered as the father of the notorious Warren Jeffs. Rulon Jeffs rose through the FLDS ranks thanks to his acute organizational and business skills, extreme intelligence, and strong commitment to the practice of plural marriage. This presentation will explore Rulon Jeffs’s activities prior to taking over leadership of the FLDS Church, both as an emerging church leader and highly successful businessman—such qualities enabling him to seize control of the sect in 1986.Craig Foster Abstract
In 2011 Warren Steed Jeffs, the FLDS prophet-president, was sentenced to life in prison plus twenty years for sexually assaulting two underaged girls. Experts and a curious viewing audience alike questioned if this would finally end Jeffs’ power and control over members of the FLDS church. This paper will examine Warren Jeffs’s continued control of the FLDS, discuss the reasons why he is able to exert such control, and analyze the impact on the FLDS. The paper is based on study of FLDS literature, including Jeffs’s claimed revelations, as well as interviews with members of Jeffs’s own family, former FLDS leaders, and other members of Hildale and Colorado City.

Hadyn B. Call is a doctoral student at Utah State University pursing a Ph.D. in Education, specializing in Curriculum and Instruction with an emphasis in Social Studies and Instructional Leadership. He has a B.A. in History and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from Weber State University and an M.A. in History from Utah State University. He is also a full time educator for Davis School District and teaches AP U.S. Government and Politics, U.S. History, and Spanish at Viewmont High School in Bountiful, Utah. His research interests involve all aspects of social studies, especially history and history teaching.

Jim Keyes Abstract
Conflict between differing cultures is as old as the world itself. Several factors contributed to the problems between American Indian populations and early cattle ranchers in southeastern Utah. The elephant in the room is obviously the encroachment of outsiders on lands the local tribes considered their own. Combined with this, the 19th century attitude of Indians being considered second class citizens and the European ideas of land use emboldened cattle grazers to take what they wanted. It seemed to both Indians and whites the only answer to the conflict was war. The sometimes bloody struggle lasted for almost 50 years.

Jim Keyes is an Associate Professor at Utah State University. He works as a Range/Animal Scientist in southeastern Utah, including the Navajo Reservation. Jim served a mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints among the Navajo People. As a student at USU he worked seven years as an interpreter for the USU Navajo Sheep Project. He received his current assignment with USU due to his bilingual abilities. He and his wife Linda own Keyes Cattle Company. They have been breeding purebred Red Angus cattle in Utah’s canyon country for the past 30 years.

Randy Williams Abstract
Cache Valley, Utah is the home of Burmese Muslim, Karen, and Eritrean refugees. Documenting and preserving their stories is an important goal of Utah State University’s Fife Folklore Archives (FFA). In May 2015, USU’s FFA and Folklore Program, with help from the Karen community, hosted a Library of Congress Field School for Cultural Documentation: “Voices: Refugees in Cache Valley.” Working with community scholars, field school students worked to document Cache Valley’s recent refugee communities, creating a digital collection of the voices and an online exhibit.
Randy Williams is Fife Folklore Archives Curator and oral history specialist at Utah State University’s Special Collections & Archives. Along with managing the world-renowned Fife Folklore Archives, she directs USU’s community-based fieldwork projects, bringing the voice of diverse peoples from the Inter-Mountain West into the Archives. With colleague Professor Lisa Gabbert, she hosted/taught the 2015 USU/Library of Congress Field School: “Voices: Refugees in Cache Valley.” Along with Elisaida Mendez, Williams was honored with a 2009 Human Ties Award from the Utah Humanities Council for the Latino/Latina Voices Project. She is the Archival Liaison for the American Folklore Society.

Deborah M. George Abstract
The New Zion Community Advocates, Inc. (NZCA) first project focused on the heritage preservation component of their mission statement. Through a grant from the Utah Humanities Council/Utah State History and monetary/in-kind services from Weber State University, Stewart Library-Special Collections, we are able to share the experiences of African American/Black community members over 80 years old who have contributed to the history of Ogden city through armed services, work, social life, church, NAACP and educational systems in an environment where their culture was not predominant.

Deborah M. George worked for the Internal Revenue Service in Compliance and Human Resources holding clerical, tax examiner, analyst, and management positions. After 30 years of service, she retired as an Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) Specialist certified in facilitation and mediation. Currently, she is the chair of the New Zion Community Advocates, Inc., a non-profit grassroots group, whose mission statement is to innovate, advance, and sustain community programs for affordable housing, social integration, youth development, heritage preservation and quality of life.

2015 Annual History Conference Session 3 Abstracts

Paiutes and the Circleville Massacre after 150 Years (Room 101)

  • Panel: Richard Turley (chair), Suzanne Catharine, Dorina Martineau, Sue Jensen Weeks, and Albert Winkler

Pitching Tents and Breaking Trail: Three Historians Afield with the Utah War (Room 102)

  • Ken Alford: “And a Bitter Experience It Was”: The Utah War and the 1858 Move South
  • James F. Martin: “Sibleys amongst the Snow”: Locating Old Camp Scott
  • William MacKinnon: Summing Up the Utah War: One Historian’s Twenty-first Century Conclusions

Immigration in Early Twentieth-Century Utah (Room 104)

  • John Sillito (chair)
  • Brian Whitney and Lorrie Rands: Immigrants at the Crossroads: An Oral History of Immigration into Ogden, Utah
  • Eileen Hallet Stone: Utah’s Jewish Agrarian Pioneers
  • Rochelle Kaplan: Jews in Utah: Not an Oxymoron!

Many Voices in Utah History (Room 105)

  • Colleen Whitley (chair)
  • Allen Dale Roberts: British Influence on Pioneer Utah’s Greek and Gothic Revival
  • David Hales, Sandra Brimhall: You’re a Woman. You Can’t Be a Certified Public Accountant: The Trials and Struggles of Hannah Claire Haines, Utah’s First Woman CPA and Prominent Business Woman
  • Seth Anderson:  “We’re Here, We’re Queer, We’re Fabulous, Get Used to Us!”: Queer Nation, 1991-1992

Latino Voices in Cache Valley (Suite A)

  • Panel: Brad Cole (chair), Randy Williams, Eduardo Ortiz, Maria Luisa Spicer-Escalante

Paiutes and the Circleville Massacre after 150 Years
Panel Abstract
In April 1866, at the height of the Black Hawk War, residents of a small Mormon settlement in Circleville slit the throats of an undetermined number of Paiute men, women, and children. In the intervening hundred and fifty years, the massacre is little known and largely forgotten by both the community where the massacre occurred and many Paiute tribal members. Panelists will evaluate the history, memory, legacy and meaning of this sad event—all part of a larger effort to memorialize the murdered Paiutes as part of the sesquicentennial anniversary.ModeratorTBD
Panelists

Suzanne Catharine, graduate student in history, University of Utah
Dorena Martineau, Paiute Tribal cultural resource manager
Sue Jensen Weeks, historian and author of How Desolate Our Home Bereft of Thee: James Tillman Sanford Allred and the Circleville Massacre
Albert Winkler, historian and archivist at Brigham Young University. He is author of “The Circleville Massacre: A Brutal Incident in Utah’s Black Hawk War,” published in the winter 1987 issue of the Utah Historical Quarterly

Pitching Tents and Breaking Trail
Kenneth L. Alford Abstract
In March 1858, as thousands of U.S. soldiers camped near Fort Bridger preparing to march into Salt Lake City, Brigham Young called for Mormons living in northern Utah to abandon their homes and move south. Cities across northern Utah soon became ghost towns as approximately 30,000 Mormons participated in “The Move South.” After a peace settlement was reached, the army marched through an almost vacant Salt Lake City in June 1858. Within a few months most of the displaced settlers returned to their homes. This presentation shares the personal side of the “Move South” as it was experienced by participants.Kenneth L. Alford is an Associate Professor of Church History and Doctrine at BYU. After serving almost 30 years on active duty in the United States Army, he retired as a Colonel in 2008. While on active military duty, Ken served in numerous assignments, including the Pentagon, eight years teaching computer science at the United States Military Academy at West Point, and four years as Department Chair and Professor of Strategic Leadership at the National Defense University in Washington, DC. His current research focuses on Latter-day Saint military service. Ken and his wife, Sherilee, have four children and thirteen grandchildren.

James F. Martin Abstract
When the weather-beaten “Johnston’s Army” arrived in the Blacks Fork Valley to find Fort Bridger all but burned to the ground, their morale must have been low. The decision to move two miles upstream between two bluffs was based on the need for water, wood, and refuge. Working with documentary sources and state-of-the-art metal detectors, this paper details what has been previously unknown: the locations of the regular units under Johnston’s command, site of his probable headquarters, and the bivouac of the U.S. Volunteers. Other findings will also be discussed.

Sergeant Major James F. Martin, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve (Ret.) is an amateur historian and metal detectorist, whose main focus of effort has been discovering and investigating the camps associated with the U.S. Army during the Utah War. At present he is a State Trooper in the Utah Highway Patrol. He was the 2005 Utah Trooper of the Year, and in 2014 was awarded the Utah Department of Public Safety Medal of Excellence for his role in the arrest of two homicide suspects. His military awards include the Meritorious Service Medal with Gold Star, Navy Achievement Medal with Gold Star, and Combat Action Ribbon.

William P. MacKinnon Abstract
This paper addresses a series of long-standing questions about the Utah War based on nearly sixty years of research in the conflict’s primary sources. The brevity of the paper and format of the session have been designed to remedy the bane of virtually all historical conferences: the lack of time for attendees to ask the questions on their minds. The focus of the paper is on four key questions presented to stimulate attendee queries during a Q&A segment intended to be the principal value of the session: Defining the Utah War: what was it and what was it not? What were the leaders’ accountabilities: who bore responsibility for what decisions and actions? Did the war have “winners” and “losers”? What was this conflict’s significance and impact?

William P. (Bill) MacKinnon is an independent historian, community volunteer, and management consultant. He has researched and written about the American West and Utah since 1958. MacKinnon is a Fellow and Honorary Life Member of Utah State Historical Society, member of OCTA’s Crossroads (Utah) Chapter, and the former presiding officer of the Yale University Library Associates, Mormon History Association, Santa Barbara Westerners, and Children’s Hospital of Michigan. He is an alumnus of Yale, Harvard Business School, and the U.S. Air Force. The second volume of his documentary history of the Utah War of 1857-1858 (At Sword’s Point) is being published in 2016 by the University of Oklahoma Press’s Arthur H. Clark imprint.

Immigration in Early Twentieth-Century Utah
Rands/Whitney Abstract
The Special Collections Department of Stewart Library at Weber State University is currently conducting an oral history project titled “Immigrants at the Crossroads” documenting first and second-generation immigration stories in Ogden. Although motivated by various circumstances and in different times from early to mid 20th century, common themes emerge in these accounts. The effects of war, economic opportunity, and religious conversion are among the myriad of reasons given for uprooting families, crossing oceans, and settling in the Great Basin.  This paper will offer five personal accounts that give us insight into the immigrant experience. 

Lorrie Rands graduated from Weber State University in 2014 with a Bachelor of Arts in History. She is currently employed full time with the Special Collections Department of the Stewart Library at Weber State University. Lorrie participated in a recent history of Ogden’s infamous 25th Street, which culminated in a show at the Union Pacific Railroad Museum. Lorrie is currently leading the “Immigrants at the Crossroads” oral history project, which will culminate in an exhibit at Only in Ogden gallery in the fall of 2015.

Brian Whitney is currently finishing a Bachelor of Arts in History at Weber State University. He has interned with the LDS Church History Department and spent last summer in Nauvoo working for Joseph Smith Historic Sites as a site interpreter as well as researching the history of the Nauvoo House. Currently, Brian is working in the Special Collections Department of the Stewart Library at Weber State University on the “Immigrants at the Crossroads” oral history project, and was recently hired by Greg Kofford Books as a History Editor and currently sits on the board of the John Whitmer Historical Association.

Eileen Hallet Stone Abstract
Three miles southwest of Gunnison in Sanpete County was located one of the largest Jewish agrarian colonies west of the Appalachian Mountains. It took root in 1911 and failed but not for lack of trying. It was marginal land—an alluvial fan at the foot of mountains, semi-arid, desolate, steep, rock-studded and sparse with rolling tumbleweed and sagebrush. Yet for a brief time it was a settlement of hope and promise called Clarion, composed of immigrant families, eastern European Jews, who believed “agriculture would make laborers instead of paupers and bread producers instead of bread beggars.” This is their story.

Eileen Hallet Stone is a writer. Her award-winning projects include nineteenth and twentieth century community stories and ethnic histories. She writes a “Living History” column for the Salt Lake Tribune. Her book, Hidden History of Utah, is a compilation of her Tribune articles. She contributed to Legends, Lore and True Tales in Mormon Country. Her collected stories in A Homeland in the West: Utah Jews Remember were developed into a photo-documentary exhibit for the 2002 Winter Olympics. She co-authored Missing Stories: An Oral History of Ethnic and Minority Groups in Utah, currently used as an educational text on diversity in Utah.

Rochelle Kaplan Abstract
My presentation, “Jews in Utah: Not an Oxymoron,” focuses on the history of Utah’s Jews from the 1840s to the 1930s, with some additional material up to the present. I aim to show that Utah’s Jews, though always small in numbers, exerted and still exert considerable influence in the state’s development. Furthermore, we have mostly harmoniously co-existed with the dominant Mormon culture. I use photographs and primary and secondary source material.

Rochelle Kaplan moved to Utah from NYC in 1998 for love and taught resource room at Granite High School until I retired. I began researching Utah’s Jewish History when I co-founded the Utah Jewish Genealogical Society and subsequently in preparation for a presentation at the IAJGS Convention held here in 2007 and in 2014. I am a former president and life member of the National Council of Jewish Women, Utah Section, a life member of Hadassah and a member of Congregation Kol Ami. Other interests are education, photography, writing, gardening, skiing, hiking and politics.

Many Voices in Utah History
Allen Roberts Abstract
This presentation explores the pervasive influence of British architect-builders and architecture on Utah Territory’s pioneer buildings. Of 140 architect-builders practicing in Utah prior to Brigham Young’s death in 1877, 57% came from England, Scotland and Wales, bringing with them British architectural books and their working knowledge of constructing Greek and Gothic Revival structures. Another 33% were American architect-builders from New England and other eastern states. They too utilized books written by English architects who had immigrated to America. The author, who has reconstructed the architectural section of Utah’s Territorial Library of 1852, will show how Utah’s pioneer architecture reflected design elements from British and New English precedents.

Allen Roberts comes from a building and artisans tradition, descending from a long line of carpenters, contractors, millwrights and pottery makers, six generations of whom practiced in Utah. Educated in architecture, art and philosophy, Allen is a former historical architect and architectural historian with the State Historical Society. In 1976 he joined Wally Cooper in creating Cooper/Roberts Architects, Utah’s first firm to specialize in historic building research, restoration, renovation, re-use and “green,” preservation. Allen has taught and lectured widely on architectural history and preservation practices. He has authored numerous books and articles. This year he will publish his newest book, “Brigham’s Architects: Utah’s Pioneer Architect-builders and Their Works, 1847-77.”

Hales/Brimhall Abstract
When Hannah Claire Haines graduated from St. Anthony High School, St. Anthony, Idaho, on May 21, 1909, she wanted to become an accountant and business woman, but such a goal seemed impossible as the perception of the time was that accounting was a profession “for men only,” and that women did not have the “emotional makeup, analytical reasoning or long-term commitment” for such a profession. This did not discourage Claire from pursuing her goal. This paper will discuss the life and struggles she faced in becoming the first woman Certified Public Accountant and the first woman bank director in Utah.

David A. Hales is Professor Emeritus of Library Science, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska and retired Director of the Library/Librarian, Westminster College, Salt Lake City. He holds a B.S. Degree from Brigham Young University, a M.L.S. from Drexel University, and a M.A. Degree from the University of Pennsylvania. He is co-author of a book about the historical resources of Alaska and has published extensively in library science, genealogy and history journals.

Sandra Dawn Brimhall, a free-lance writer, journalist, and history enthusiast, received a B.S. degree in Mass Communications from the University of Utah in 1975. She has published numerous articles and was one of the co-authors of a book Brigham Young’s Homes that was published by Utah State University Press. In 2014, she was the joint recipient with her daughter Dawn Brimhall of the BYU Charles Redd Center for Western Studies Award for their article titled, “Labor Spies in Utah during the Early Twentieth Century.” She and her husband, Steven Lyn Brimhall, are the parents of three children

Seth Anderson Abstract
In 1991, a chapter of Queer Nation formed in Salt Lake City with the stated purpose of promoting queer visibility, fighting homophobia, heterosexism, and anti-queer violence. This paper intervenes in the historiography of gay and lesbian history in several ways. First, the formation of a national Queer Nation represents a shift from “gay and lesbian history” towards the more expansive “LGBT history.” Second, studying Queer Nation Utah provides an example of why social movements emerge when and where they do. Third, studying Queer Nation Utah shows how this social movement oriented itself towards a hostile straight community as well as towards the gay and lesbian community in the state, a sexual minority that during the 1980s had remained mostly assimilationist and accommodationist to oppressive anti-gay policies and social stigma.

Seth Anderson completed his master’s degree in history at the University of Utah in May 2015. He studies the history of sexuality in the American West, specifically gay and lesbian history in Utah. Situated at the crossroads of sexuality, gender, race, and class his work reveals the anxieties about sexuality in the late twentieth century. He also studies AIDS in Utah and its effects on sexuality, culture, and family. His final project in graduate school tracked the development of Queer Nation Utah, a radical gay rights group that promoted queer visibility and fought homophobia in the early 1990s.

Latino Voices in the Cache Valley
Panel Abstract
While much has been preserved and written about northern Utah’s Mormon pioneers, other groups to the area have not always enjoyed the same archival presence. In an effort to rectify this, Utah State University Libraries’ Special Collection and Archives (SCA) began Northern Utah Speaks (NUS). NUS is a fieldwork tool to identify, gather, and preserve the voices of underrepresented communities in the archives. SCA partnered with Cache Valley’s Latino communities to initiate the Latino/a Voices Project to preserve the “voices” of the area’s largest minority group.  Using the LVP interviews as a springboard, this panel will discuss the history of Latinos in Cache Valley.

Brad Cole is currently the Interim Dean for and the Associate Dean for Special Collections and Archives Division at the Utah State University Libraries. He received a Bachelor’s degree in history from Idaho State University in 1980 and a Master’s Degree in history from Utah State University in 1986 and holds certification in the Academy of Certified Archivists. Cole worked as the manuscript curator at Utah State University from 1984-1995 and held the same position at Northern Arizona University from 1995-2005. He has been Associate Dean for Special Collections at Merrill-Cazier Library since 2005.

Randy Williams is Fife Folklore Archives Curator and oral history specialist at Utah State University’s Special Collections & Archives. Along with managing the world-renowned Fife Folklore Archives, she directs USU’s community-based fieldwork projects, bringing the voice of diverse peoples from the Inter-Mountain West into the Archives. At present she is organizing (with Professor Lisa Gabbert) the May 2015 USU/Library of Congress Field School: “Voices: Refugees in Cache Valley.” Along with Elisaida Mendez, Williams was honored with a 2009 Human Ties Award from the Utah Humanities Council for the Latino/Latina Voices Project. She is the Archival Liaison for the American Folklore Society.
Professor Eduardo Ortiz received his Ph.D. in Sociology (2009) from Utah State University (USU). Currently, he is senior researcher in both the Research and Evaluation and the Interdisciplinary Training Divisions of the Center for Persons with Disabilities in the College of Education at USU. He is adjunct assistant professor with the Department of Sociology, Social Work, and Anthropology at USU; and Core Faculty of the Utah Regional Leadership Educational in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities program. He also holds a Law Degree (J.D.) from the Catholic University of Ecuador, his native country. Eduardo has been highly involved in community work.

María Luisa Spicer-Escalante (Ph.D., University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, 2002) joined the Linguistics faculty at Utah State University in 2003. She has served as Co-Director of the Master of Second Language Teaching program since 2010. Her professional interests include Spanish heritage speakers in the United States, English as a foreign language teacher preparation, pedagogical aspects of Second/Dual Language Acquisition, bilingual writing, and sociolinguistics.

2015 Annual History Conference Session 2 Abstracts

10:30 – 11:45 a.m.

Rediscovering Utah’s Native Voices (Room 101)

  • Panel: Shirlee Silversmith (chair), Richard Turley, Brent Rogers, Gregory Smoak, Shoshone and Ute Native speakers

Under-documented Communities in Utah: Iosepa and Chinese Railroad Workers (Room 102)

  • Panel:TBA

Disability Rights Movement in Utah and the Nation (Room 104)

  • Panel: Troy Justesen (chair), Barbara Toomer, Sherry L. Repscher, Tracy R. Justesen

Documenting the Topaz Experience (Room 105)

  • Scotti Hill: When Words Weren’t Enough: Art of the Topaz Internment Camp
  • Jane Beckwith

The Power of Oral History: Uncovering the Stories of Latino/as in Utah (Suite A)

  • Panel: Matt Basso (chair), Jennifer Macias, Juan Jose Garcia, Andrea Garavito Martinez

Splinters of a Nation: The Story of German Prisoners of War in Utah (documentary/panel) (Suite B)

Panel: Scott Porter, Allan Kent Powell

Rediscovering Utah’s Native Voices
Panel Abstract
A recent discovery of a rare first edition of Dimick B. Huntington’s Ute and Shoshone vocabulary has prompted conversations about the availability and reliability of historical documents and the American Indian voice. This panel brings together scholars and individuals from the University of Utah, the LDS Church History Library, the Division of Utah Indian Affairs, and Native nations to further discuss the history, accuracy, and availability of the Ute and Shoshone vocabulary and other similar documents. It is the panel’s hope to bring more interested individuals into the conversation and perhaps engender collaborative efforts to make Native voices heard once again.
Richard E. Turley Jr. is Assistant Church Historian and Recorder for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and the author of Victims: The LDS Church and the Mark Hofman Case, Massacre at Mountain Meadows, and Mountain Meadows Massacre: The Andrew Jenson and David H. Morris Collections.
Gregory E. Smoak is Director of the American West Center and Associate Professor of History at the University of Utah. He specializes in American Indian, American West, environmental, and public history. He completed an M.A. at Northern Arizona University and a Ph.D. at the University of Utah. He has taught at Colorado State University and the University of Minnesota. The University of California Press published his book, Ghost Dances and Identity: American Indian Ethnicity, Racial Identity, and Prophetic Religion, in 2006. He is currently working on an environmental history of Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, under a contraction with the National Park Service.
Brent M. Rogers is coeditor of volumes in the Document series of the Joseph Smith Papers. He received a BA with honors in history from San Diego State University, an MA in public history from California State University–Sacramento, and a Ph.D. in nineteenth-century United States history from the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. He previously served as a digital editor and research fellow for the Papers of William F. Cody and as an instructor in the history department at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. He has produced scholarship on digital history, history of the American West, and Mormon history.

Disability Rights
Panel Abstract
This panel will explore the disability rights movement in Utah and the nation, presenting the changes throughout law and our society in celebration of this year’s twenty-fifth anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The panel will discuss disability rights advocacy that have led to increased opportunities for people with disabilities to access public schools, public accommodations, housing, travel, and employment, among others. Historically, Utah’s disability rights movement mirrored the nation. The panel will discuss the social issues that prevented the full and equal participation of people with disabilities in daily life and the gradual changes made over the past fifty years.

Troy R. Justesen is the public policy director for the Utah Developmental Disabilities Council. He is a former associate director for domestic policy at the White House, in part responsible for President George W. Bush’s disability policy. He is also a former U.S. assistant secretary of education. Justesen published papers on the United Nations convention on the rights of people with disabilities, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and special education policy. He holds degrees from Utah State University and Vanderbilt University.
Barbara Toomer is a leader in the Disabled Rights Action Committee of Utah. She has been active in the disability rights movement in Utah and the nation for more than forty years. Toomer’s direct acts of civil disobedience changed accessibility in public buildings, transportation and schools across Utah. Toomer is a former officer in the U.S. Army Nurse Corps.

Sherry Repscher is a leading advocate in the disability rights movement for more than forty years. She is the immediate past director of accessibility for the Utah Transit Authority. Repscher was the executive director of the Utah Governor’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities. Repscher is widely regarded as a national expert on the Americans with Disabilities Act and was present at the White House signing of the law in 1990. She holds degrees from Illinois Wesleyan University, the University of Utah, and Utah State University.

Tracy Justesen is a former attorney at the Civil Rights Division within the U.S. Department of Justice. He is also a former associate director for domestic policy at the White House and an assistant secretary of education. He has been active over the past twenty years in implementing federal and state law to increase independence of people with disabilities across the nation. He is the former chair of the U.S. Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board and technical advisor to the U.S. delegation to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Individuals with Disabilities.

Documenting the Topaz Experience
Scotti Hill Abstract
My paper explores the process of curating the Topaz Museum’s inaugural art exhibition, wherein I had the unique opportunity to construct a show based on art made during internment from 1942-1945. While the Topaz Museum’s permanent collection contains within it countless visual testaments to the difficulties of internment, the art simultaneously attests to the resilience of the human spirit under the most difficult of circumstances and serves as a powerful reminder of a critical moment in both our national and state history.

Scotti Hill is art historian specializing in modern and contemporary art. In addition to working as a freelance curator, she is an art critic for the Deseret News and 15 Bytes: Utah’s Art Magazine.

The Power of Oral History
Panel Abstract
This session will describe the value of using oral histories as a way of better understanding marginalized populations in Utah, specifically Latino/as. A lack of archival resources about Latino/as often makes it difficult to see them as significant parts of the Utah population. However, by using oral histories as part of a research process, scholars are better able to understand parts of Latino/a history that are not readily available in archives. Panelists will describe using oral histories to look at the ways in which Latino/as in Utah after World War II understood and defined the “American Dream;” the lack of Latino/a representation in Utah textbooks from K-12; the inherent value in incorporating the stories of Latino/as into the Utah educational curriculum; and the roles of Chicana/Latina educators in Utah.

Jennifer Macias is a Ph.D. Candidate at the University of Utah studying twentieth-century Latino/as and United States History. She is interested in the history of family, and the ways in which Latino/as in the post-World War II era fundamentally altered the political, social and cultural terrain of the Rocky Mountain West. Her dissertation analyzes the experiences and discontents of Latino/a families in the region post-1940, arguing that Latino/as mounting frustrations with the “American Dream,” particularly the inherent “whiteness” of the dream, prompted Latino/a families to redefine the parameters of the dream itself, ultimately reclaiming it as their own “Latino/a Dream.”

Juan José García is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Education, Culture & Society at the University of Utah. Born and raised in Reynosa, Tamaulipas, Mexíco–Pharr, Texas, border region, he is a cultural anthropologist by trade with an emphasis in folklore. His parents always instilled in him their Mexican roots by teaching him how to read and write Spanish and understanding family and community traditions in food, clothes, respect, and spirituality. These lessons have always guided his research, including his current research on how Latino parents participate in their kids’ through a community garden.

Andrea Garavito Martínez is a doctoral student in the Department of Education, Culture, and Society at the University of Utah and a middle school teacher in West Valley City, Utah. Her dissertation research focuses on the educational experiences of pre-service undergraduate Latinas/Chicanas in a teacher education program. Using feminist genealogy and Chicana/Latina epistemologies, her work traces historical raced-gendered discourses of Chicana/Latina educators in Utah to understand the current debate of the recruitment, retention, and training of Latina/o educator. Her areas of interest are Chicana Feminist Thought, critical raced-gendered epistemologies, community-school partnerships, Latina testimonios, and critical race theory.

Splinters of a Nation
Panel Abstract
Splinters of a Nation is a documentary film in progress that tells the extraordinary story of 8,000 WWII prisoners sent to Utah. For more than three years, these prisoners worked side-by-side with thousands of Utahns on farms and factories across the state. This powerful collision of two enemies on the homefront created life-changing exchanges and left behind some extraordinary tales. Tragedy marked the end of their stay as a deranged American guard opened fire on hundreds of sleeping prisoners, killing nine and wounding 19. This tragic event in the small rural town of Salina became the largest WWII massacre on American soil.

Gregory Scott Porter is the Producer/Director of the upcoming documentary film Splinters of a Nation: The Story of German Prisoners of War in Utah, which will premiere on public television in April 2016. Scott has developed and produced engaging and meaningful video for more than 10 years. He has created award-winning short-form documentaries, television ads, and instructional videos. Scott is driven by a desire to share significant and inspiring stories with the world—stories that would otherwise remain untold. Scott is also the Managing Producer for USANA, a global nutrition company based in West Valley City.

2015 Annual History Conference Session 1 Abstracts

8:45 – 10:15 a.m.

The Breadth of Regional History: The Case of Southeastern Utah (Room 101)

  • Panel: Robert McPherson (chair), Floyd O’Neill, Kent Powell, and Lee Ann Kreutzer

Archaeology, Paleontology, and Ethnography (Room 102)

  • Lori Hunsaker (chair)
  • Daniel King: Jurassic Jones: The Archaeology of Paleontology
  • Joseph Bryce: Marks in the Clay: Impressions and What They Tell Us
  • Madison N. M. Pearce: Prehistoric Diets and Medicines of the Utah Great Basin: Using Ethnohistory to Explore Botanical Remains From Spotten Cave Human Coprolites

Engaging Minorities and Making Room (Room 104)

  • Elizabeth Heath (chair)
  • Lloyd Pendleton: Utah’s Ten Year Plan to End Chronic Homelessness
  • Gerrit van Dyk and Jeremy Ingersoll: Their Hispanic Heritage: The Preservation of Different Cultures in LDS Spanish-speaking Congregations

Politics and Religious Authority (Room 105)

  • Greg Thompson (chair)
  • Gary Bergera: Ezra Taft Benson Meets Nikita Khrushchev, 1959: Memory Embellished
  • Kenneth and Geoffrey Cannon: Separation of Prophet and State? The 1914 Reelection of Reed Smoot
  • Jason Friedman: “Unless the ‘Saints’ decorate my personage with plumage and ‘something to make it stick’”: Duncan McMillan and the fight for Wasatch Academy

Sustaining Vietnamese-American Voices: The Utah Vietnam Oral History Project (Suite A)

  • Panel: Chris Dunsmore (chair), panelists TBA

Magna: An American Story (documentary) (Suite B)

Trish Hull (chair)


 

The Breadth of Regional History
Abstract
Why do the histories of individual—even isolated—regions matter, and what do they mean in relation to the broader contexts of state, national, and world history? This session brings together a panel of distinguished Utah historians to discuss the meaning of regional history by examining the historiography of southeastern Utah.Panel BiosRobert S. McPherson is Professor of History at USU Eastern Blanding Campus and a member of the Board of State History.

Floyd A. O’Neill is the founding director of the American West Center at the University of Utah.

Allan Kent Powell is the former editor of Utah Historical Quarterly and a long-time voice for public history in Utah.

Lee Ann Kreutzer is an archaeologist for the National Park Service and a member of UHQ’s editorial board. 

Archaeology, Paleontology, and Ethnography
Daniel King Abstract
To the general public, archaeology and paleontology are often thought of as the same field of study. In spite of that belief the two disciplines can be separated by millions of years. Still, fossils, ancient cultures, and historic groups do connect. Fossils have been found in Fremont, Ancestral Puebloan, and historic Native American contexts across Utah. Ethnographic accounts relate how fossils were often used for medicinal purposes, quick healing, and even protection against shootings. The presence of fossils in the multicultural contexts evinces the idea that history, on any level, has always been a part of the human experience regardless of time, region, or culture.Daniel King BioDaniel King is a M.A. student studying archaeology and museum practices at Brigham Young University. He currently works as a publications assistant for the department of anthropology, as well as a research assistant for the Office of Public archaeology. His research interests include ancient plant use in northern Mexico, the development of social complexity in mid-level societies, and integrating technology into archaeology and museum studies. King has worked on many international archaeological projects in Jordan and Mexico, as well as local projects here in Utah and Nevada.

Joseph Bryce Abstract
Archaeologists use material remains to draw conclusions about the past but often a lot of physical objects do not survive in the archaeological record. Perishable material, which likely composed a high percentage of prehistoric artifacts, is largely missing from archaeological interpretations. Fortunately, impressions left in soft clay can provide a way that this “missing majority” can still be studied. Corn, baskets, cordage, and structural beam impressions as well as fingerprints have often been overlooked, but hold a wealth of information about prehistoric peoples of Utah. This paper will examine how impressions recovered from Fremont and Anasazi sites have been used to gain a more complete picture of Utah’s prehistory.

Joseph Bryce Bio
Joseph Bryce is a M.A. student studying archaeology and museum studies at Brigham Young University. He currently works as the collection manager at the Museum of Peoples and Cultures. Research interests include Fremont ceramics, basketry, bone tools, digital archaeology, experimental archaeology, museum studies, historical archaeology, PXRF, photogrammetry, and many other varied and interesting topics. Bryce has worked at several archaeological projects in Utah, Nevada, Idaho, and Missouri. 

Madison N. M. Pearce Abstract
Seed analysis of eighteen prehistoric human coprolites found in Spotten Cave (42 UT 104), coupled with ethnographic data, illustrates how and why former inhabitants of Utah Valley consumed both wild and cultivated plants. This research has provided crucial data for rebuilding prehistoric diets by comparing variations in macrobotanical evidence found in coprolites and at sites. As one of the few botanical analyses for prehistoric populations in Utah Valley, the research here is important because of its diachronic review of plants from 5580±120 BP to 50 BP.

Madison N. M. Pearce Bio
Madison Pearce is currently pursuing a master’s at BYU in archaeology, emphasis paleoethnobotany. Her B.A. was also in archaeology at BYU. She currently assists Dr. Terry Ball in phytolith morphometrics and has assisted in several projects with the Office of Public Archaeology, notably the Old Provo Tabernacle and Wolf Village in Goshen. She and her husband have one son, Ronan, whom they juggle between each other as they work on their respective degrees. 

Engaging Minorities and Making Room
Lloyd S. Pendleton Abstract
In 2003, Governor Olene Walker was invited to have the State of Utah participate in the development of a Ten-Year Plan to end chronic homelessness in Utah. Ten percent of the homeless population is chronically homeless, and they cost communities between $20,000 and $40,000 per person per year. A new housing model had been developed, Housing First, that took chronically homeless people off the street or out of shelters and put them into housing, with case management services. Utah adopted a plan using the Housing First model and reduced the chronic homeless count by 91% since 2005. This presentation will review how Utah accomplished this reduction.   Lloyd S. Pendleton BioFor more than thirteen years Lloyd has been an advocate for the homeless. In 2004, as a loaned executive from the LDS Church, he took the lead in writing and implementing the State of Utah’s Ten-Year Plan for ending chronic homelessness. In 2006, Lloyd retired from his church employment and went to work for the state as Director of the Homeless Task Force to continue implementation of the plan to end chronic homelessness and reduce overall homelessness by 2015. Lloyd is a graduate of Brigham Young University and holds a Bachelor’s degree in Political Science and a Master’s of Business Administration.

Van Dyk / Ingersoll Abstract
This paper will demonstrate how the environment of LDS Spanish-speaking congregations has helped or hindered the cultural preservation of the Hispanic people. With the rapid growth of the Hispanic demographic of the LDS church, it is important that their rich heritage is given an environment conducive to, and accepting of, their customs and identity. The many different countries that are represented in LDS Spanish-speaking congregations each have their own distinct histories that have resulted in different customs. The LDS Church members from these distinct backgrounds must find the way to preserve their own individual traditions as a group with many traditions. We will analyze how well this challenge has been met. 

Politics and Religious Authority
Gary Bergera Abstract
In 1966, Ezra Taft Benson, a high-ranking official of the LDS Church and former U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, delivered a speech on the campus of LDS-owned Brigham Young University in which he summarized his encounter with Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev in September 1959. Benson told BYU students that Khrushchev had bragged to him, in part, “[W]e’ll keep feeding you small doses of socialism until you’ll finally wake up and find you already have Communism. We’ll so weaken your economy until you’ll fall like overripe fruit into our hands.” The present essay examines the accuracy of Benson’s 1966 and later recitals of Khrushchev’s alleged comments.Gary Bergera BioGary James Bergera is managing director of the Smith-Pettit Foundation, Salt Lake City, Utah. He is author of Conflict in the Quorum: Orson Pratt, Joseph Smith, Brigham Young; co-author of Brigham Young University: A House of Faith; editor of Line Upon Line: Essays on Mormon Doctrine, The Autobiography of B. H. Roberts, and Statements of the LDS First Presidency: A Topical Compendium; and co-editor of Joseph Smith’s Quorum of the Anointed: A Documentary History, 1842-1845, and The Nauvoo Endowment Companies: A Documentary History, 1845-1846. His publications have received numerous awards.

Cannon Abstract
When Reed Smoot ran for reelection in 1914, his “Federal Bunch” was declining, Woodrow Wilson was President, and the new 17th Amendment required popular election of U.S. Senators. Utah’s “Bull Moose” Progressives and Democrats nominated James Henry Moyle, a charismatic and talented attorney (and a devout Mormon), in a coalition ticket. The vote was close, with Smoot winning by a plurality. Why did Smoot win? Moyle accused President Joseph F. Smith, but the story is more complicated than that. The story, issues, and numbers of the 1914 Senate election make it one of the most compelling in Utah’s history.

Cannon Bios
Ken Cannon is a lawyer and independent historian in Salt Lake City who also teaches commercial law at the local law school. He has published widely on Utah and Mormon history and has published and lectured extensively on corporate bankruptcy law. He serves on a number of professional boards and has been a Fulbright Scholar in Finland. Other than spending time with his lovely wife, Ann, their five sons, three daughters-in–law, and three grandchildren, Ken likes it best when he is researching in musty archives or trying to make sense of his research.

Geoffrey E. Cannon is a recent graduate of Brigham Young University in political science. During his time as a student there, he worked as a research assistant for David B. Magleby, conducting research on campaign finance and voting behavior. He also played an integral role in the 2014 Utah Colleges Exit Poll, a biennial study undertaken by multiple colleges and universities in the state. Finally, he was an undergraduate research fellow at the Center for the Study of Elections and Democracy from May of 2013 to April 2015.

Jason Friedman Abstract
In the spring of 1875, Presbyterian Minister Duncan McMillan moved to Mount Pleasant. He acquired a building, erected a school, a church, and a legacy all in the span of five years. He found success with the help of a strong apostate contingent and despite the efforts of Brigham Young and the Mormon leadership. Despite personal hardship and various threats on his life, McMillan founded a school that would “endure like the Wasatch Mountains.”

Jason Friedman Bio
Raised in New York City, Jason Friedman has worked in academia for fourteen plus years. Having earned his PhD in history from Michigan State University in 2009, currently Friedman teaches history and political science at Wasatch Academy and serves as director of the honors credit program. A modern American historian, Friedman’s primary research focuses on the cultural issues surrounding the American presidency and the balance of power during the 1970s. However, in deference to his current position, Friedman has expanded his historical research to include the institutional history of Wasatch Academy, specifically the history of the school’s founder, Duncan McMillan.

Magna: An American Story
Panel Abstract
Magna: An American Story offers a captivating historical portrait of what has been called Utah’s quintessential American city. Magna began as an agricultural community but quickly evolved into an industrial center with the discovery of copper in the Oquirrhs. Magna came to embody a rare and diverse cultural heritage, and the community matured out of the powerful forces of exploration, discovery, industrialization, immigration, assimilation and shared purpose.

Robert K. Avery Bio
Dr. Robert K. Avery has been on the University of Utah Communication faculty for nearly four and a half decades, and over his career has earned numerous recognitions and honors across the areas of research, teaching, and service. He is the coauthor or editor of six books, more than seventy-five journal articles and book chapters, and over two hundred conference papers and presentations. He has held the honorary rank of University Professor at the U in recognition of his innovative contributions to undergraduate instruction and also has been awarded the special recognition of University of Utah Presidential Teaching Scholar.

Trish Hull Bio
Trish Hull is president of the Magna Chamber of Commerce and Manager of the Magna Library. She has a BA in Political Science from BYU and MLS from Emporia State University. Trish is currently an employee of Salt Lake County Library Services as manager of the Magna Library. She is a past president of the Utah Library Association. She is also currently president of the Magna Chamber of Commerce. Trish has been a resident of Magna for 34 years.


 

2015 Annual Utah State History Conference

Deep Roots, Many Voices: Exploring Utah’s Multicultural Past

Utah is – and always has been – an eclectic mix of peoples and communities. Join us on October 2nd at the Utah Cultural Celebration Center for a free conference full of workshops, history sessions, panels and documentaries on the theme of multicultural diversity. Lunch is included on October 2nd.  Workshops and tours will also be held in conjunction with the conference (please see below for details and dates).

Utah’s history is enriched by the study of a host of peoples, experiences, and voices. The histories of ethnicity, gender, work, and family, from the perspective of ordinary people, do more than pepper diversity in Utah history: they fundamentally change and enhance our understanding of the state and its past. These histories are ones of empowerment, creativity, and survival, as well as conquest, dispossession, and prejudice.

Register for the conference

Conference Overview Schedule

October 1, 2015
Workshops (click here for schedule)
Rio Grande Depot
300 S. Rio Grande Street
Salt Lake City, UT
October 2, 2015
History Sessions (click here for schedule)
Lunch and Keynote
Utah Cultural Celebration Center
1355 West 3100 South
West Valley City, UT
 .
October 3, 2105
Tour of Iosepa (click here for schedule)
Separate paid registration is required!
Registration is now available!
October 10, 2015
Tour of Topaz (click here for schedule)
Separate paid registration is required!
Registration is now available!

 

For questions, please contact Alycia Aldrich at statehistory.utah.gov or 801-245-7226

Thank you to our conference sponsors:  W.W. Clyde and Co., American West Center, Ames Construction, Chevron, Charles Redd Center for Western Studies, Fort Douglas Military Museum, J. Willard Marriott Library, and Utah Westerners.

October 2, 2105 12:00 Lunch and Awards Program
Keynote Speaker Pamela S. Perlich, “Utah’s Hidden Diversity: Decoding Evidence from the Census”

September 2015 Brown Bags
Please join us at Utah State Archives for five fascinating discussions in September as we prepare for our annual conference (“Deep Roots, Many Voices: Exploring Utah’s Multicultural Past”) on October 2nd. The first four brown bags begin at 12 noon. (ONLY the Sept. 30th will begin at 1 p.m.)  Bring your friends and your lunch!

______________

October 2, 2015 8:45 am – 5:00 p.m. History Sessions

Paper abstracts and presenter biographies can be accessed by clicking on the session below.

8:45 – 10:15 a.m. 10:30 – 11:45 a.m. 1:45 – 3:15 p.m. 3:30 – 5:00 p.m.
The Breadth of Regional History: The Case of Southeastern Utah (panel) Rediscovering Utah’s Native Voices Paiutes and the Circleville Massacre after 150 Years (panel) Religion and Race: Evaluating Religion of a Different Color: Race and the Mormon Struggle for Whiteness (panel)
Archaeology, Paleontology, and Ethnography Under-documented Communities in Utah: Iosepa & Chinese Railroad Workers (panel) Pitching Tents and Breaking Trail: Three Historians Afield with the Utah War Diversity and Sport
Engaging Minorities and Making Room Disability Rights Movement in Utah and the Nation (panel) Immigration in Early Twentieth-Century Utah Religious and Cultural Difference
Politics and Religious Authority Documenting the Topaz Experience Many Voices in Utah History Native-White Interaction in Nineteenth-Century Utah
Sustaining Vietnamese-American Voices: The Utah Vietnam Oral History Project (panel) The Power of Oral History: Uncovering the Stories of Latino/as in Utah (panel) Latino Voices in Cache Valley (panel) Exploring Utah’s Multicultural Past through Oral History (panel)
Magna: An American Story (documentary) Splinters of a Nation: The Story of German Prisoners of War in Utah (documentary/panel) 1:45-2:15 — The Twelve Left Behind (documentary)
2:20-5:00 — In Football We Trust (documentary) and Polynesians in Utah (panel)

8:45 – 10:15 a.m.

The Breadth of Regional History: The Case of Southeastern Utah (Room 101)

  • Panel: Robert McPherson (chair), Floyd O’Neill, Kent Powell, and Lee Ann Kreutzer

Archaeology, Paleontology, and Ethnography (Room 102)

  • Lori Hunsaker (chair)
  • Daniel King: Jurassic Jones: The Archaeology of Paleontology
  • Joseph Bryce: Marks in the Clay: Impressions and What They Tell Us
  • Madison N. M. Pearce: Prehistoric Diets and Medicines of the Utah Great Basin: Using Ethnohistory to Explore Botanical Remains From Spotten Cave Human Coprolites

Engaging Minorities and Making Room (Room 104)

  • Elizabeth Heath (chair)
  • Lloyd Pendleton: Utah’s Ten Year Plan to End Chronic Homelessness
  • Gerrit van Dyk and Jeremy Ingersoll: Their Hispanic Heritage: The Preservation of Different Cultures in LDS Spanish-speaking Congregations

Politics and Religious Authority (Room 105)

  • Greg Thompson (chair)
  • Gary Bergera: Ezra Taft Benson Meets Nikita Khrushchev, 1959: Memory Embellished
  • Kenneth and Geoffrey Cannon: Separation of Prophet and State? The 1914 Reelection of Reed Smoot
  • Jason Friedman: “Unless the ‘Saints’ decorate my personage with plumage and ‘something to make it stick’”: Duncan McMillan and the fight for Wasatch Academy

Sustaining Vietnamese-American Voices: The Utah Vietnam Oral History Project (Suite A)

  • Panel: Chris Dunsmore (chair), panelists TBA

Magna: An American Story (documentary) (Suite B)

  • Trish Hull (chair)

10:30 – 11:45 a.m.

Rediscovering Utah’s Native Voices (Room 101)

  • Panel: Shirlee Silversmith (chair), Richard Turley, Brent Rogers, Gregory Smoak, Shoshone and Ute Native speakers

Under-documented Communities in Utah: Iosepa and Chinese Railroad Workers (Room 102)

  • Panel:TBA

Disability Rights Movement in Utah and the Nation (Room 104)

  • Panel: Troy Justesen (chair), Barbara Toomer, Sherry L. Repscher, Tracy R. Justesen

Documenting the Topaz Experience (Room 105)

  • Scotti Hill: When Words Weren’t Enough: Art of the Topaz Internment Camp
  • Jane Beckwith

The Power of Oral History: Uncovering the Stories of Latino/as in Utah (Suite A)

  • Panel: Matt Basso (chair), Jennifer Macias, Juan Jose Garcia, Andrea Garavito Martinez

Splinters of a Nation: The Story of German Prisoners of War in Utah (documentary/panel) (Suite B)

  • Panel: Scott Porter, Allan Kent Powell

1:45 – 3:15 p.m.

Paiutes and the Circleville Massacre after 150 Years (Room 101)

  • Panel: Richard Turley (chair), Suzanne Catharine, Dorina Martineau, Sue Jensen Weeks, and Albert Winkler

Pitching Tents and Breaking Trail: Three Historians Afield with the Utah War (Room 102)

  • Ken Alford: “And a Bitter Experience It Was”: The Utah War and the 1858 Move South
  • James F. Martin: “Sibleys amongst the Snow”: Locating Old Camp Scott
  • William MacKinnon: Summing Up the Utah War: One Historian’s Twenty-first Century Conclusions

Immigration in Early Twentieth-Century Utah (Room 104)

  • John Sillito (chair)
  • Brian Whitney and Lorrie Rands: Immigrants at the Crossroads: An Oral History of Immigration into Ogden, Utah
  • Eileen Hallet Stone: Utah’s Jewish Agrarian Pioneers
  • Rochelle Kaplan: Jews in Utah: Not an Oxymoron!

Many Voices in Utah History (Room 105)

  • Colleen Whitley (chair)
  • Allen Dale Roberts: British Influence on Pioneer Utah’s Greek and Gothic Revival
  • David Hales, Sandra Brimhall: You’re a Woman. You Can’t Be a Certified Public Accountant: The Trials and Struggles of Hannah Claire Haines, Utah’s First Woman CPA and Prominent Business Woman
  • Seth Anderson:  “We’re Here, We’re Queer, We’re Fabulous, Get Used to Us!”: Queer Nation, 1991-1992

Latino Voices in Cache Valley (Suite A)

  • Panel: Brad Cole (chair), Randy Williams, Eduardo Ortiz, Maria Luisa Spicer-Escalante

1:45 – 2:15 p.m.

The Twelve Left Behind (documentary) (Suite B)

  • Desk Top History’s film short “The Twelve Left Behind,” the story of Italian prisoners of war during World War II, produced by Kelly Nelson

2:20 – 5:00 p.m.

In Football We Trust (documentary) (license agreement pending)

Polynesians in Utah (Suite B)

  • Panel: Jake Fitisemanu Jr., Ulysses Thomas Tongaoneval, other panelists TBA

3:30 – 5:00 p.m.

Religion and Race: Evaluating Religion of a Different Color: Race and the Mormon Struggle for Whiteness (Room 101)

  • Panel: Brad Westwood (chair), David Rich Lewis, Michael H. MacKay, Paul Reeve, and LaShawn Williams-Schultz

Diversity and Sport (Room 102)

  • Richard Kimball (chair)
  • Joseph Soderberg: Wicket Mormons and Cricket Gentiles: Cultural Imperialism in Utah’s Sporting Past
  • Intermountain Cricket League Exhibition

Religious and Cultural Difference (Room 104)

  • Will Bagley (chair)
  • Isaiah Jones: The Gentile Stays in Cache Valley
  • Craig L. Foster and Newell G. Bringhurst: Two Changing Faces of Fundamentalist Mormonism: Rulon and Warren Jeffs

Native-White Interaction in Nineteenth-Century Utah (Room 105)

  • David Grua (chair)
  • Wendy Simmons Johnson: An Underground Store, the Skull Valley Goshute, and Red Ink:  Contact Period in Rush Valley
  • Hadyn B. Call: Kidnapped and Purchased: Piecing Together the Story of Ruth Piede Call Davids—a Paiute Indian
  • Jim Keyes: Showdown in the canyons: History of interaction between early cattle ranchers and Native Americans in southeastern Utah.

Exploring Utah’s Multicultural Past through Oral History (Suite A)

  • Panel:
    • Jodi Graham (chair)
    • Randy Williams: Cache Valley Refugee Voices
    • Deborah M. George: New Zion Community Advocates, Inc.
    • Sarah Langsdon Singh

 

2015 State History Conference Tours

iscOctober 3, 2015 Iosepa Tour

In 1889, Pacific Islander converts to the Mormon Church, established a community in Skull Valley, naming it Iosepa (i.e., “Joseph”). The settlement survived for 28 years, finally being abandoned in 1917.To celebrate the rich Asian and Pacific Islander heritage of Utah please join the Utah Division of State History and the Fort Douglas Military Museum for an introduction to the history and archaeological legacy of this community and its descendants. After a background lecture by Dr. Benjamin Pykles of the LDS Church History Department, the tour will head out to what remains of the Iosepa Townsite and Cemetery for a step back in time. While in Skull Valley the tour will take advantage of the proximity to see the original ruts and cuts from the Donner-Reed and Hastings Cutoff route of the California National Historic Trail with interpretive discussions along the way. The field trip will begin with a 9:30 am Iosepa lecture at the Fort Douglas Military Museum by Ben Pykles, then travel to Iosepa at 10:00 am, returning to Fort Douglas at 3:00 pm.  A boxed lunch will be provided.

Please note, separate paid $50.00 registration through Fort Douglas Military Museum is required for this tour! (tours are not included in the general free conference registration)

Register for the Iosepa Tour

 

topaz_7_fullOctober 10, 2015 Topaz Tour

This year marks the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II. It also marks the closing of the Topaz internment camp near Delta, Utah, where over 11,000 Japanese-Americans were imprisoned between 1942 and the camp’s closure in 1945. To commemorate and explore the rich and troubling history of this seldom-seen side of the American home front, the Utah Division of State History, the Fort Douglas Military Museum and the American West Center would like to invite you on a tour of the internment camp and the brand new Topaz Museum.

Admission to this day-long tour will include a box lunch and a copy of Yoshiko Uchida’s classic story of life at Topaz, Desert Exile: The Uprooting of a Japanese-American Family. Dr. John Reed of the University of Utah History Department will provide historical information en route.

Please note, separate paid $75.00 registration through Fort Douglas Military Museum is required for this tour! (tours are not included in the general free conference registration)

Register for the Topaz Tour

UHQ Summer 2015 Web Supplements

1_MolokansA Conversation with Marshall E. Bowen on Russian Molokans in Box Elder County, Utah

Marshall E. Bowen, “The Russian Molokans of Park Valley”

In this Q&A we asked Marshall Bowen about the brief tenure of the Molokans in Park Valley and the process of uncovering their history.

 


2_Hill-CreekThe Hill Creek Extension: A Portfolio of Primary Documents

Kathryn MacKay, “The Uncompahgre Reservation and the Hill Creek Extension”

We offer faithful reproductions of some of the BIA records that MacKay used to detail the Ute Tribe’s long struggle to secure the Hill Creek Extension.

 


3_women-inventorsEarly Utah Women Inventors: A Conversation with Christine Cooper-Rompato

Christine Cooper-Rompato, “Women Inventors in Utah Territory”

We sat down with Christine Cooper-Rompato to discuss her research on Utah’s nineteenth-century women inventors. Click here for the audio of our conversation. We also provide links to many of the patents filed by these inventors.


4_wedding-dressThe Carol Carlisle Summer Wedding Dress Collection: A Photo Gallery

The Carol Carlisle Summer Wedding Dress Collection: A Photo Essay

Check out beautiful color photos from the wedding dress collection housed at the Utah State Historical Society. Photographs by Anna Oldroyd.

 


5_indian-vocabulariesUte and Shoshone Vocabularies

Found: Rare First Edition of the Earliest Ute and Shoshone Vocabulary

In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries a number of Ute and Shoshone vocabularies were published in Utah. We provide links to the three editions of Dimick Baker Huntington, as well as volumes produced by Joseph A. Gebow, George W. Hill, and Ralph V. Chamberlin. Digitized copies courtesy of the LDS Church History Department.

 

World War II Honor List

The End of World War II in Images

Taken on August 14, 1945, the following images taken in downtown Salt Lake City are from the Salt Lake Tribune Collection housed at the Utah State Historical Society. Gathered by Ron Fox, these photos capture the emotion felt as Japan surrendered.

Click here for Utah’s World War II “Honor List of Dead and Missing,” which was published by the War Department in June 1946. This report also lists each Utahn casualty by name, according to their county of residence.

 

Utah Historical Quarterly Special Events

The Utah State Historical Society sponsors a regular series of lectures highlighting the work and scholarship of the Utah Historical Quarterly, the state’s official history journal. These lectures feature the latest work of writers and historians on significant, varied topics in Utah history. All members of the public are cordially invited. Please check back on this webpage for an updated listing of upcoming events and access recordings of our past lectures.


Upcoming Event

 

To Be Announced

 

 


Event Archives

Summer 2015

Created and Preserved: Using Objects to Understand Women in Utah History
Wednesday, July 22, 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Thatcher-Young Mansion, 35 West 100 South, Logan, UT 84321

Three-genThe July 2015 Utah Historical Quarterly lecture will focus on the experiences of Utah women in the late 1800s and early 1900s, in part by examining objects that they created, used, and preserved. Christine Cooper-Rompato, an English professor at USU, will describe the inventions and lives of several nineteenth-century Utah women who received patents in their own names. Holly George, co-managing editor of UHQ, will discuss a remarkable collection of wedding dresses at the Utah State Historical Society that comes from five generations of a Utah family. The lecture is free and open to the public.

View full color photo gallery of the wedding dress collection housed at the Utah State Historical Society

Spring 2015

Inventing the State of Deseret
May 20, 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Eccles Community Art Center in Ogden, Utah

deseretBruce Worthen discusses the tense negotiations between the Mormons and Washington over statehood, as seen through the eyes of Utah’s congregational delegate John Bernhisel. In 1849, Bernhisel helped create a fictitious government known as the “State of Deseret” to allay the fears of Congress about the Mormons. Instead, as Worthen argues, it almost led to war in 1852.


Winter 2015

History as Art and Craft: A Conversation with Historians
February 19, 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Washington County Historic Courthouse, St. George, Utah

imageWhat is the nature of historical knowledge: How do historians ply their trade, tackle complex and often controversial topics, and seek meaning and significance in the past? Why do historians come to different conclusions about the past? We’ve assembled a cast of historians to speak about the philosophy and craft of history, with special emphasis on Juanita Brooks and the history of southern Utah.

Read written transcript UHQ-History as Art and Craft
Event Flier 2-19-15