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National Register Nominations | April 2014

In April 2014, the Board of State History, for the Utah Division of State History, will review five (5) nominations to the National Register. These nominations are:

The Board of State History meets on April 17, 2014. These meetings are public. To view or print the meeting agenda, please visit the Board of State History.

Link

Utah Archaeology Week 2014

During Utah Archaeology Week you can learn about Utah’s past and have fun while doing it.

Statewide events include:

  • Open house at the Rio Grande Depot with educational activities for kids
  • Annual poster contest
  • Lectures and paper presentations
  • Tours of archaeological sites

62nd Annual State History Conference | Sept 25-27, 2014

The dates for the 62nd Annual State History Conference have been set. Mark your calendars now so you can attend.

When: September 25th – September 27th, 2014 in Salt Lake City, Utah @ The City Library and The Leonardo

Technology has helped people live and thrive in Utah for over 12,000 years. In order to understand and remember the development of technology in Utah, this year’s Utah State History conference will focus on Utah Technology through Time.

The conference will be tentatively organized into three tracks:
• The emergence of Utah’s high tech industry, 1950s–present
• Utah industry, technology, and enterprise in the 19th and 20th centuries
• Prehistoric technology in the region of Utah

Have a proposal you’d like to submit for consideration? Submit your proposal here!

Nominate someone for a Utah State History Award.

Submit a paper for the Helen Z. Papanikolas Award for the Best Student Paper on Utah Women’s History.


Helen Z. Papanikolas Award for Best Student Paper on Utah Women’s History

Utah State History sponsors the Papanikolas Award to encourage new scholarly research in the area of Utah women’s history at colleges and universities.  The award is named for Helen Z. Papanikolas (1917-2004), a former member of the Utah State Board of History who was most noted for her research and writing on Utah and ethnic history, but also wrote fiction, as well as women’s history.

Submission Guidelines

  • Papers must address some historical aspect of women’s lives in Utah.
  • The author must be enrolled at a college or university.
  • Papers need not be published.
  • Papers should include original research that includes primary sources.  The paper must be footnoted.
  • Papers must be received by June 1, 2014.
  • Please call or E-mail us on June 1, 2014 if you have not heard directly from us that we received your paper.

The winner receives a monetary award as well as being honored at Utah State History’s annual meeting held September 25-27, 2014 in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Submit papers to:

Linda Thatcher
(801) 534-0911
thatcher0911@msn.com

Call for Papers and Session Proposals

Thank you for your interest in submitting a proposal for the 62nd Annual Utah State History Conference, Utah Technology Through Time 

Technology has helped people live and thrive in Utah for over 12,000 years. In order to understand and remember the development of technology in Utah, this year’s Utah State History conference will focus on Utah Technology through Time.

The conference will be tentatively organized into three tracks:

  • The emergence of Utah’s high tech industry, 1950s–present
  • Utah industry, technology, and enterprise in the 19th and 20th centuries
  • Prehistoric technology in the region of Utah

Utah State History invites the public, scholars, students, and organizations to submit presentation proposals for conference sessions to be held on September 26 at The Leonardo, Utah’s Science and Technology Museum.  In addition, some sessions may be posted online. Individuals and organizations may address any topic relating to Utah history.  However, priority will be given to proposals that explore the many facets of technological innovation throughout Utah’s human past. Proposals can include papers, podcasts, presentations, panels or sessions.

Proposals should be submitted by April 22, 2014. Each proposal must include:

  • A one-page (300-word limit) abstract detailing the presentation or session and its significance
  • Bio for each participant (100-word limit)
  • Audio-visual requirements
  • Your permission, if selected, for media interviews, session audio/visual recordings, and electronic sessions or podcasts during or in advance of the conference.  The Division of State History will use these recording in its effort to meet its history- related mission.
  • Contact information of the presenter(s)


Creating Positive Impacts in FY2013

VisualHighlights

Visual Division Highlights Report FY2013

In FY2013, the Utah Division of State History aimed to positively impact communities throughout Utah by assisting developers, agencies, communities, architects, archaeologists, researchers, genealogists, law enforcement, Certified Local Governments, homeowners, teachers, students, and the general public.

These reports show the impact of State History’s services on communities throughout Utah, on the economy, and on the general state of heritage and history in the state of Utah. State History’s programs–Antiquities, Historic Preservation, Library & Collections, and Public History seek to positively impact the communities and constituents they serve through free or easily-accessible services, and looks forward to another year of providing the services our communities need to thrive.

texthighlights

Text Only Division Highlights Report FY2013

  Please feel free to download this report in a text-only format, or a more compact, visual format.

Please note that both reports are .pdf documents and you will need Adobe Reader to download and read these reports. To get a free copy of Adobe Reader, click here.

Digital Resources from the Utah Division of State History

The Utah Division of State History (State History) has many online resources available to the public for research purposes. Some of our current digital resources include:

State History resources digitized in partnership with U of U Marriott Library:

Digital photos:  70,000 historical photos online at http://history.utah.gov/digital-photos

Newspapers:  300,000 newspaper pages scanned and on Utah Digital Newspapers, http://digitalnewspapers.org   These newspapers cover crucial periods of Utah history.

  • Salt Lake Telegram:  1867, 1902, 1907-1912, 1914-1949
  • Ephraim Enterprise:  1891-1972
  • Inter-Mountain Republican: 1906-1909
  • Manti Messenger:  1893-1973
  • Salt Lake Herald:  1870-1920

Archaeological site records: 35,000 records online, available for licensed archaeologists

Publications: 47,000 pages online at http://history.utah.gov/publications

Complete copies of these periodicals:

  • Utah Historical Quarterly—scholarly  journal published since 1928
  • Beehive History—magazine with short, interesting stories published from 1974-2002
  • History Blazer—brief history anecdotes published as part of Utah’s centennial celebration, 1995-1996
  • Utah Archaeology—annual professional journal published by State History and partners
  • Antiquities Section Selected Papers—a monograph series examining the prehistoric cultures of Utah
  • Utah Preservation—historic preservation magazine published annually 1997-2007

Complete copies of these books:

  • 29 Centennial County Histories—A volume on each county published as part of Utah’s centennial celebration
  • A Way of Seeing: Discovering the Art of Building in Spring City, Utah
  • Brigham Street
  • Building by the Railyard
  • Carbon County: Eastern Utah’s Industrialized Island
  • Corinne—The Gentile Capital of Utah
  • Emery County: Reflections on Its Past and Future
  • First 100 Years: A History of the Salt Lake Tribune
  • Historic Buildings of Downtown Salt Lake City
  • Let ‘Em Holler: A Political Biography of J. Bracken Lee
  • Not by Bread Alone: The Journal of Martha Spence Heywood
  • Of Work and Romance: Discovering Utah’s Barns
  • On the Ragged Edge: The Life and Times of Dudley Leavitt
  • San Juan County, Utah: People, Resources, and History
  • The Architecture of Fort Douglas, Utah, 1862-1995
  • The Avenues of Salt Lake City
  • The Peoples of Utah
  • Utah’s Historic Architecture, 1847-1940

Other State History digital resources:

Cemeteries and burials:  information on nearly 600,000 deceased persons online at http://history.utah.gov/cemeteries . This database was named by Family Tree magazine as one of 2013’s best state-run genealogy websites. Visitors may also go to http://cemeteries.utah.gov/ directly.

Information on researching and rehabilitating historic buildings at http://history.utah.gov/info-resources-hist-bldgs

Catalogs and indexes to research library, manuscripts, phone directories, newspapers, and yearbooks at http://history.utah.gov/history/collections-2

Markers and monuments:  text from historical markers statewide at http://history.utah.gov/markers-and-monuments-database

Sister Agency Resources Digitized by Marriott Library

  • State Fine Art Collection
  • State Folk Art Collection
  • Utah American Indian Digital Archive:  Articles, books, documents, oral histories, photographs, and maps on Utah’s tribes at http://utahindians.org/archives/
  • Microfiche:  6,000 sheets of microfiche for State Library
  • Utah State Bulletin:  digitized and online at State Library

1948′s Unforgettable Winter

To view this video in full screen mode, click the icon in the bottom right of the screen

Do you have your own story of the winter of 1948-1949? Send it to us! Send your memories to hollygeorge@utah.gov

Winter’s fun (right?). But sometimes you can have too much of a good thing.

Salt Lake City Main Street 1949 covered in snow

Salt Lake City Main Street, 1949

In 1948-49, the most severe winter on record beat up the West. Even Las Vegas got 17 inches of snow. Though other winters saw more snow, wind, extreme cold, and little thawing made the snow pile up. And up. And up. Think about that next time you want to complain about winter!

Three days of ferocious snow

Early in January 1949, a vicious three-day blizzard broke windows, damaged roofs, and blew snowdrifts six to ten feet high on roads and streets. After that the temperature fell to below zero. The drifts crusted so hard that snowplow crews struggled to remove them. Sardine Canyon, between Brigham City and Cache Valley, stayed closed for a month. People got stranded, even in Salt Lake City–18 families in Salt Lake’s Canyon Rim area had to be dug out.

Livestock starved and froze. The state launched “Operation Haylift,” dropping bales of hay from military cargo planes. The Sons of Utah Pioneers, perhaps thinking of the next year’s hunt, lobbied for the state to also feed deer, pheasants, ducks, and quail. Meanwhile, skaters took advantage of strong ice at the Liberty Park pond, and children played on the huge snowdrifts.

Another blizzard

Snow Plows in Utah, 1948

Snow Plows in Utah, 1948

On January 15, another blizzard struck, bringing more minus temperatures. Some people had a novel–and irrational–idea: The city should truck in salt water from the Great Salt Lake or water from hot springs to melt the snow on the streets.

And another, big-time!

Then on January 22 the mother of all blizzards roared in. Wind-whipped snow and slides closed roads all over the state. In Millard County, where the snow drifted as high as the telephone wires, a couple of men spent 36 hours stranded in a truck waiting for a snowplow to dig them out. Avalanches trapped skiers at Alta and Brighton–though a few decided to simply ski down Little Cottonwood Canyon to the valley.

A TRULY big chill

After the storm quit, the cold air hit: -25 degrees in Salt Lake City. Woodruff reached -45. Schools all over the Wasatch Front closed because gas supplies could not meet the demand. Coal companies could not deliver coal, and Utah Power and Light cut the power to its generators. The big freeze continued for several days, and then again on February 5, headlines read: “New Blizzard Throttles Utah.” And so it went, snowing all the way into April. The one thaw came in late February, and it brought its own miseries: flooding. An ice jam dammed a canal, flooding houses around 800 West and between 1300 and 1700 South.

Yep, it was a hard winter, but people rose to the occasion. They did what needed to be done. And many were heroic in their efforts to help others get through a bitter cold time.

From Mark Eubank

We asked meteorologist Mark Eubank if 1948-49 was the snowiest winter on record. It was not. Here is what he said:

First, let’s talk about WHEN we get the snow.

Winter is a specific period comprising three months or about 90 days. Meteorologically, winter includes the months of December, January, and February. Since it can also snow in the Fall and in the Spring we have a snowfall year, which typically runs from September through May. So when we say a certain season was extra snowy, we need to define the time period.

Most people tend to think of the “winter” season (December thru February) when they remember stormy years. I think that is true because much of the Spring snow melts quickly.

Winners of the “Most Snow” award:

Here is a list showing the top five “winters” and the top five “snowfall years.”

Snowiest Utah “Winters” Snowiest Utah “Snowfall Years”

                     Dec-Feb

     Snowfall                      Sep-Jun       Snowfall

1995-96

69.0″

1943-44

91.3″

1951-52

70.2″

1983-84

98.0″

1948-49

74.7″

1992-93

98.7″

1968-69

74.9″

1973-74

110.8″

1992-93

80.4″

1951-52

117.3″

 
 

 

The top two snowfall years had heavy Winter snows PLUS a lot of snow in Fall and Spring.

The Winter of 1992-93 was exceptional. In fact, it ranks at number one, plus there was a lot of snow in the Fall.

Cold + snow is what we remember

The reason the Winter of 1948-49 is so noteworthy is because the snowfall was accompanied with exceptional cold! In fact, 1948-49 is the combined coldest-snowiest Winter ever measured in Utah. That combination kept the snow around for most of the Winter, and in addition the wind blew the snow into huge drifts.

Winters in Utah can be cold and dry, or cold and wet. Or they can be warm and dry or warm and wet. The warm and wet Winters are quickly forgotten, but the cold and wet Winters are the ones that leave lasting impressions.

While the Winter of 1992-93 was the snowiest, it didn’t even rank in the top 15 for cold.

Winners of the “coldest” weather award:

Coldest Utah Winters

  Dec-Feb   Snowfall Avg Temp

1963-64

39.1″

24.0

1931-32

41.9″

24.0

1930-31

15.0″

23.4

1948-49

74.7″

19.8

1932-33

66.2″

19.5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Post by Kristen Rogers-Iversen, Associate Director, State History