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National Register Nominations | September 2014

In October 2014, the Board of State History, for the Utah Division of State History, will review five (5) nominations to the National Register. These nominations are:

John & Margaret Price House in Salt Lake City


Murray City Diesel Power Plant in Murray


Rawsel & Jane Bradford House in Murray


James & Mary Jane Miller House in Murray


John & Sarah Jane Wayman House in Centerville


The Board of State History meets on October 17, 2014. These meetings are public. To view or print the meeting agenda, please visit the Board of State History on this web site. Please note: agenda for October 2014 may be delayed due to the production of the sixty-second annual Utah State History conference.

62nd Annual Conference Tours

Register now for tours for the 62nd Annual Utah State History conference. You must be registered in order to attend a tour.


62nd Annual Utah State History Conference
“Utah Technology Through Time”


Register for the conference. It's free and open to the public.


September 25th – September 27th, 2014

Salt Lake City, Utah @ The City Library and The Leonardo


schedule


sessions


tours


This year’s conference is brought to you by a host of generous partners. View them here. 


O'Mara click here to read more


Technology has helped people live and thrive in Utah for over 12,000 years. In order to understand and remember the development of technology in Utah, this year’s Utah State History conference will focus on Utah Technology through Time. Download the conference Save the Date notice.


The conference is organized into four tracks: • The emergence of Utah’s high tech industry, 1950s – present • Utah industry, technology, and enterprise in the 19th and 20th centuries • Prehistoric technology in the region of Utah • Utah history



Utah’s Latest Additions to the National Register

Check out the latest historic buildings in Utah listed on the National Register of Historic Places: George & Mabel Anderson House, Brigham City; John & Sara Jane Wayman House, Centerville; John & Margaret Price House, Salt Lake City; Murray Hillside Historic District, Murray; Murray City Diesel Power Plant, Murray; Rawsel & Jane Bradford House, Murray; and the Ezra & Abigail Shomaker House, Manti.


George & Mabel Anderson House
Brigham City, Box Elder County, Utah

UT_Box Elder County_Anderson House_0003Statement of Significance:
The George and Mabel Anderson House, constructed in 1913, is a 1½-story brick bungalow located at 63 N. 200 East in Brigham City, Utah. The style of the bungalow includes characteristics of both the Arts & Crafts and the Prairie School movements. The interior layout is unusual for the period and includes a unique double-arch inglenook feature. The only exterior modifications are a balcony on the rear elevation and a planter box on the façade. The house is located in a residential neighborhood just east of the Brigham City commercial business district. The neighborhood includes a range of pioneer-era to modern houses. The 0.22-acre property includes a contributing concrete block shed with attached carport (circa 1950). The Anderson House is exceptionally well-preserved and retains integrity in all seven qualities as required by the National Register of Historic Places: location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling, and association. The building is a contributing resource in its Brigham City neighborhood.

Read the full nomination:
George & Mabel Anderson House


John & Sara Jane Wayman House
Centerville, Davis County, Utah

Statement of Significance: UT_SaltLakeCo_WaymanHouse_001
The John and Sarah Jane Wayman House, built in 1888, is locally significant under Criterion A in the area of Agriculture for its association with the historical development of Centerville in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The period of significance, between 1888 and 1932, encompasses the occupancy of the first owners, John Wayman, and his wife, Sarah Jane Cannell Wayman. John Wayman was a farmer and grain broker who was active in agricultural marketing and contributed to the civic development of the community at the turn of the twentieth century. Sarah Jane Wayman took over management of the family farm holdings after her husband’s death. She had worked as a cook for one of Utah’s territorial governors before her marriage and made her Centerville home a community gathering place for prominent locals and visiting dignitaries. The property is also locally significant under Criterion C in the area of Architecture. When John and Sarah Jane Wayman moved from Salt Lake City to Centerville in 1888, they built a stylish Italianate two-story brick home that was very different from the stone dwellings of the rural settlement’s earlier residents. At the same time, they built the first and only known carriage house in Centerville. The brick carriage house was built with a unique indoor privy. The Wayman House is being nominated as part of the multiple property submission Historic Resources of Centerville, Utah, within the following contextual periods: “Railroad and Economic Expansion: 1868-1910” and “City Development: 1911-1940s.” The Wayman House and associated carriage house are in excellent condition and are contributing historic resources in Centerville, Utah.

Read the full nomination:
John & Sarah Jane Wayman House


John & Margaret Price House
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah

Price_House_002Statement of Significance:
The John and Margaret Price House, built in 1959, is locally significant under C in the areas of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. The Price House is significant for its association with the architect John N. Clawson and the landscape architect Karsten Hansen. The period of significance spans the initial design and construction of the house in 1959 and the completion of the landscaping in 1960. The property is an excellent example of the Wrightian Modern movement in domestic architecture. The design of the multi-level house and the retaining walls that fully integrated it with its sloping site are reminiscent of Frank Lloyd Wright’s later Prairie School designs. The Price House is significant under Criterion C in the area of Architecture as a representative of the residential work of John N. Clawson. John N. Clawson was a prominent Salt Lake City architect whose work was varied and eclectic within the Mid-Century Modern period. The property is also significant in the area of Landscape Architecture as collaboration between Clawson and Karsten Hansen, who was called the “Father of Utah Landscape Architecture” and designed over 600 properties during his career. The property is an exceptionally well-preserved example of an integrated residence and landscape design in the mid-twentieth century. Despite some minor alterations, the John and Margaret Price House has excellent historic integrity. The property contributes to the historic character of its Salt Lake City neighborhood.

Read the full nomination:
John & Margaret Price House


Murray Hillside Historic District
Murray, Salt Lake County, Utah

Statement of Significance: UT_Salt Lake County_Murray Hillside HD_0010
The Murray Hillside Historic District, located southeast of the historic business district of Murray, Utah, is locally significant under Criteria A and C under the National Register of Historic Places Multiple Property Submission, Historic and Architectural Resources of Murray City, 1850 to 1967. The primarily residential Murray Hillside neighborhood, comprising 282 contributing resources, is significant in the areas of Community Planning & Development and Architecture. Under Criterion A in the area of Community Planning & Development, the Murray Hillside neighborhood represents the four distinct patterns of development that characterized Murray City within the period of significance from 1900 to 1966.

During the first phase of development, between 1900 and 1945, Murray City was an industrial town with a thriving business district and a community of scattered farmsteads. The land within the Murray Hillside neighborhood was owned by a handful of farming families. Only a few houses were built as infill on the roads bordering the farms. A second phase of development began in 1946, when two subdivisions were platted in the neighborhood. One subdivision was platted by a committee of local landowners who sold the subdivided lots, but did not build the homes; however, the committee did retain design review control over the subdivision. The other subdivision was platted by an experienced regional merchant builder who saw Murray’s potential for suburban development in the post-war period. These two subdivisions set the pattern of curvilinear development within the neighborhood. The third phase began in 1952, when one-third of the neighborhood was platted by a relative newcomer who specialized in mass-produced tract housing. The third phase ended in 1959 when nearly all of the available lots had been developed. The fourth phase spans the years 1960 to 1966 when the last two subdivisions were platted. This phase represents the dramatic decrease in Murray’s suburban boom of the 1950s and a return to slower development and individualized house designs for each lot.

Under Criterion C in the area of Architecture, these four phases also represent the rise and fall of popular architectural styles in Murray that reflect trends across the United States in the same time period. Ninety-eight percent of contributing resources within the district are single-family dwellings that are significant for their association with the “Americanization of Murray’s Residential Architecture, 1902-1967” and the “Murray’s Subdivision Development Boom Period, 1946-1967” contextual periods in the Historic and Architectural Resources of Murray City, 1850 to 1967 MPS. The architecture of the Murray Hillside neighborhood represents the bell curve of domestic architecture in Murray as it transitioned from early twentieth century farmhouses to the FHA-promoted Minimal Traditional cottages to the peak of Ranch-style tract housing to the Modern/Contemporary residences of the early 1960s. The Murray Hillside Historic District retains exceptional historic integrity in the qualities of location, setting, design, feeling, and association of a curvilinear post-war Ranch-style residential suburb.

The population of Murray City quadrupled during the postwar suburban building boom between the late 1940s and the early 1960s. While there are many neighborhoods within the city that represent this time period, the Murray Hillside neighborhood was deemed an outstanding candidate for the NRHP for three reasons: 1) the distinct building phases within the district represent all the approaches used by developers throughout the city during the period of significance; 2) the district retains a high degree of historic integrity in representative architectural styles and types of the period; and 3) the hilly residential neighborhood has distinct boundaries with cohesive historic streetscapes. The Murray Hillside Historic District is an excellent example of a Ranch-style residential suburban and contributes to the historic resources of Murray City.

Read the full nomination:
Murray Hillside Historic District


Murray City Diesel Power Plant
Murray, Salt Lake County, Utah

UT_Salt Lake Co_Murray_Power_Plant_0007

Statement of Significance:
The Murray City Diesel Power Plant, built in phases between 1927 and 1959, is locally significant under Criteria A in the areas of Politics/Government, and Criterion C in the areas of Architecture and Engineering. The property is eligible under the multiple property submission, Historic Resources of Murray City, Utah, 1850–1967. The associated historic context is “Public Resources of Murray, 1902-1967.” The building is significant in the area of Politics/Government as one of the few remaining buildings associated with the rise of the Murray City Power Department, which maintains the only municipally-owned power company in Salt Lake County. The period of historic significance between 1927 and 1959 not only represents the major construction phases of the building, but spans a period of population growth and infrastructure stabilization in the city. The building was originally known as the auxiliary power plant supporting the city’s hydroelectric plant at the mouth of Little Cottonwood Canyon, but by the 1940s, the output of the diesel plant exceeded the hydroelectric plant changing the city’s long term plans for providing electrical power to its residents. The power plant is also significant under Criterion C in the areas of Engineering and Architecture. As large diesel generators were added to the system, the city came up with a unique solution that required removing walls and expanding rather than building a new plant. The design and materials of the original 1927 building were maintained with each expansion. As a result, the historic power plant has a grace and historic integrity not typical for industrial buildings of the period. The Murray City Diesel Power Plant has excellent integrity and contributes to the historic character of its Murray neighborhood.

Read the full nomination:
Murray City Diesel Power Plant


Rawsel & Jane Bradford House
Murray, Salt Lake County, Utah

UT_Salt Lake Co_Bradford_House_002

Statement of Significance:
The Rawsel and Jane Bradford House, built in phases between 1866 and c.1900-1915, is locally significant under Criterion C in the area of Architecture. The Bradford House is significant as one of only five known extant homes built in the early settlement period of Murray’s history before the coming of the railroad. The Bradford Home is a two-story adobe and brick house that was typical of the settlement period. It is the only adobe example that retains integrity of design and workmanship. Part of the original homestead is now a golf course and the open space contributes to the historic setting of the Bradford home. The period of significance spans from the beginning of construction in 1866, to c.1900-1915, when the last alterations during the historical era were completed. Rawsel Bradford was a teamster and a farmer. He and his wife, Jane Gardner Bradford, maintained a 120-acre homestead for many years. Their son, Archibald Bradford and his wife, Rachel Crozier Bradford, inherited a small portion of the acreage and updated the home with a bungalow porch and other modern conveniences. The current owner is a member of the Bradford family. The property is eligible under the Multiple Property Submission, Historic Resources of Murray City, Utah, 1850–1967. The associated historic contexts are “Early Residential and Agricultural Buildings of Murray, 1850-1910” and the “Americanization of Murray’s Residential Architecture, 1902-1965.” In spite of a more-recent alteration to the rear addition, the Rawsel and Jane Bradford House has good historic integrity and contributes to the historic character of its Murray neighborhood.

Read the full nomination:
Rawsel & Jane Bradford House


Ezra & Abigail Shomaker House
Manti, Sanpete County, Utah

104

Statement of Significance:
The Ezra and Abigail Shomaker House, in Manti, Sanpete County, Utah, constructed in phases between circa 1866 and 1895, and rehabilitated 2003-2011, is locally significant under Criterion B for its association with its first and longest-term occupants, Ezra and Abigail Shomaker. The period of significance spans the occupancy of the Shomakers between 1866 and 1922. The house is significant in the areas of Exploration/Settlement and Community Planning because of the contributions of the Shomakers. Ezra and Abigail Shomaker are remembered in Manti for their contributions to the transformation of Manti from a pioneer outpost to a modern city. Both Ezra and Abigail were born outside of Utah and brought to Manti as young children. As a young man, Ezra Shomaker played a prominent role in the local conflicts between the Sanpete settlers and local bands of Native American Ute tribes. During his married years, he was prosperous in the sheep industry. As a pioneer woman, Abigail Tuttle Shomaker, served in several community leadership positions, as well as supporting her family materially through her efforts in the home. During Ezra Shomaker’s two terms as the mayor of Manti, he put in place infrastructure allowing Manti residents to enjoy the comforts of a twentieth-century city. Although there are many pioneer-era couples that have similar accomplishments, Ezra and Abigail Shomaker are unique in that their Manti home of fifty-six years reflects each phase of their lives, and in turn, represents different phases in the development of the Manti community. The circa 1866 west wing was built of rough stone in the Greek Revival style and is typical of early pioneer homes in Sanpete County. The circa 1880 ell was built of more finely tooled stone at a period when both the Shomaker family and the community of Manti were growing in prominence. Finally, the brick east wing and the Victorian Eclectic details added circa 1895 represents the peak of prosperity of the Shomaker family at the turn of the twentieth century. Though the property experienced years of neglect in the late twentieth century, the recent rehabilitation has restored much of the grandeur of the house during the period of occupation of Ezra and Abigail Shomaker. The Shomaker House contributes to the historic character of Manti, Utah.

Read the full nomination:
Ezra & Abigail Shomaker House


The National Register of Historic Places is the official federal list of properties that are significant in American history, architecture, archaeology, or engineering.

How can I get a house or building listed? (and other frequently asked questions)

 

National Register Nominations | April 2015

In April 2015, the Board of State History, for the Utah Division of State History, will review five (5)  nominations to the National Register and a Multiple Property Submission. These are:

George & Ellen Furgis House Salt Lake County
Salt Lake Country Club & Golf Course Salt Lake County
Carhart Pueblo San Juan County
Marsac Elementary School Additional Documentation Summit County
Ogden Union Exchange Building Weber County
Murray Multiple Property Submission Salt Lake County

The Board of State History meets on April 16, 2015. These meetings are public. To view or print the meeting agenda, please visit the Board of State History on this web site.

Utah’s Historic Preservation Strategic Plan Survey

Over the next year, the Utah State Historic Preservation Office within the Utah Division of State History will lead out on a concerted effort to assess the current state of historic preservation in Utah, and through collaboration with state and federal agencies, local governments, various non-profit stakeholders, and as many members of the Utah Public as possible we hope to find a set of common goals and objectives to guide Historic Preservation in Utah over the next seven years.
If you would like to learn more about the Statewide Historic Preservation Plan process, please go the National Park Service’s webpage (click here)
A first step in this effort is to assess the current knowledge of historic preservation issues in Utah through an online survey. We hope that you have the time to fill out the survey as candidly and straightforwardly as possible. There is no place in the form for any personal information, so the answers are completely confidential.

Please use the scroll bar on the right to move through the survey.

Call for Entries Open for “DesignArts Utah ’14” – 19 May 2014

Utah Arts & Museums announces the call for entries for “DesignArts Utah ’14,” a juried exhibition highlighting the work of professional and student designers in any design field who currently live in Utah. Ellen Lupton, senior curator of contemporary design at the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Museum in New York, is this year’s juror. All entries must be submitted by June 27, 2014.

This exhibition of selected designs opens Friday, August 29 and runs through Friday, October 17, 2014, culminating with a closing reception in conjunction with Salt Lake Design Week and Salt Lake Gallery Stroll. The exhibition will be inside the Rio Grande Depot in the Rio Gallery, located at 300 South Rio Grande (455 West) in Salt Lake City. The designer selected as the Juror’s Award Winner will receive a $3,000 recognition and thank-you award for the achievement and contribution to Utah.

Juror Ellen Lupton is senior curator of contemporary design at the Smithsonian’s Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum in New York City. Recent museum projects include “Graphic Design — Now in Production,” an exhibition on national tour through 2014, co-organized by Cooper-Hewitt and the Walker Art Center. Lupton also serves as director of the graphic design MFA program at MICA (Maryland Institute College of Art), where she has authored numerous books on design processes, including Thinking with Type, Graphic Design Thinking, and Graphic Design: The New Basics.

DesignArts annual exhibitions feature selections of designs, prototypes, and produced samples by designers in Utah’s various design fields. Designers may submit produced work or conceptual, pre-production documentation. All Utah designers are invited to participate, including those in the fields of architecture (landscape or structural and community planning and design — urban and rural), as well as those in brand/packaging, display, fashion, furniture, graphic, industrial, interior, lighting, theatre or film set, transportation, web design or other design fields. Entries may be submitted online or via CD/DVD to the Utah Division of Arts and Museums, Design Arts Program, 300 S. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City, UT 84101 by 5:00 p.m. on June 27, 2014.

Further information, including entry forms and instructions, is available online at www.designartsutah.org. If you have questions, contact Jim Glenn at jglenn@utah.gov or 801.245.7271.

- SAVE THE DATES AND PLAN TO ATTEND -

September 25 -27, 2014

sixty-second annual
Utah State History conference

UTAH TECHNOLOGY THROUGH TIME

Location: The Leonardo and The City Library
@ Library Square
210 East 400 South, Salt Lake City, UT 84111

For questions: Alycia Aldrich
801-245-7226, aaldrich@utah.gov

REGISTER ONLINE. IT’S FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

Download the conference Save the Date notice.