Skip to content
Secondary Content

Category Archives: History Featured

UHQ Summer 2014 Web Extras

CONTENTS

Since 1928, Utah Historical Quarterly has collected and preserved the state’s history. Until now, UHQ content has only been published in print form. The content presented here is our inaugural effort to introduce the journal—and our state’s rich and colorful history—to an online audience. In the digital medium, we are able to do more than can be done in print: reproduce UHQ articles and essays accompanied with expanded photos, maps, and bibliographies; publish photo galleries, primary sources, oral histories, video documentaries, and other special features suitable for the web; and create an interactive forum for readers to discuss, debate, and wrestle over all things Utah history. We also hope to become a “go-to” resource for Utah Studies teachers and students on the secondary school level. We have big plans for this online venture, culminating in the January 1, 2015, launch of a brand new Utah Historical Quarterly web site. Members of the Utah State Historical Society receive printed copies of UHQ. Click here for information on how to become a member. UHQ back issues are available online through a searchable database.


Previous UHQ Cover Designs The quarterly has had differing designs over the years. Compare our latest cover design to those from previous years.


The Making and Unmaking of UtahSkeleton Map By Jared Farmer An extended version of Farmer’s keynote address at the 2013 Utah State History conference, published in the Summer 2014 UHQ. Using over fifty images as a visual tour de force, he explores place creation and landscape loss in Utah, reminding us that “the past—as inscribed in our present landscape—is a record of tragedy, hope, and considerable irony.”


March 28, 1923. Library of Congress.Race with the Sun By Carl Kuntze The story of Air Force Lt. Russell Lowell Maughan’s ground-breaking dawn-to-dusk transcontinental flight. Precisely ninety years ago this summer, this Logan, Utah, native covered 2,670 miles in just under 22 hours, helping to inspire the new possibilities of air travel in the modern age.


Mother and children at Topaz camp Memoirs: An Annotated Bibliography Compiled by Caitlin Shirts An annotated compilation of memoirs, all previously published in the UHQ, providing delightful and often surprising recollections of Utah from an earlier time, many recalled from childhood or adolescence.

62nd Annual Utah State History Conference
“Utah Technology Through Time”


Register for the conference. It's free and open to the public.


September 25th – September 27th, 2014

Salt Lake City, Utah @ The City Library and The Leonardo


O'Mara click here to read more


Technology has helped people live and thrive in Utah for over 12,000 years. In order to understand and remember the development of technology in Utah, this year’s Utah State History conference will focus on Utah Technology through Time. Download the conference Save the Date notice.


The conference will be tentatively organized into four tracks:
• The emergence of Utah’s high tech industry, 1950s – present
• Utah industry, technology, and enterprise in the 19th and 20th centuries
• Prehistoric technology in the region of Utah
• Utah history


Tentative Conference Schedule
9-24-2014 5:30pm – 7:30pm Board of State History Chairman’s
Private Reception and USHS Awards
Programs, Alta Club (by invitation only)
9-25-2014 7:00pm – 9:00pm Awards Program & Keynote Speaker:
Dr. Margaret O’Mara, University of
Washington, “Place Matters: The Alchemy
of Innovation in Utah and Beyond,”
The City Library
9-26-2014 8:00am – 5:00pm Opening plenary session with 4
concurrent sessions, The Leonardo
9-27-2014 TBD Utah history of technology tours–
Tours have an associated fee; see
tour schedules for more details

awardsbanner

Nominate someone for a Utah State History Award.


Submit a paper for the Helen Z. Papanikolas Award for the Best Student Paper on Utah Women’s History.



Utah’s Historic Preservation Strategic Plan Survey

Over the next year, the Utah State Historic Preservation Office within the Utah Division of State History will lead out on a concerted effort to assess the current state of historic preservation in Utah, and through collaboration with state and federal agencies, local governments, various non-profit stakeholders, and as many members of the Utah Public as possible we hope to find a set of common goals and objectives to guide Historic Preservation in Utah over the next seven years.
If you would like to learn more about the Statewide Historic Preservation Plan process, please go the National Park Service’s webpage (click here)
A first step in this effort is to assess the current knowledge of historic preservation issues in Utah through an online survey. We hope that you have the time to fill out the survey as candidly and straightforwardly as possible. There is no place in the form for any personal information, so the answers are completely confidential.

Please use the scroll bar on the right to move through the survey.

Creating Positive Impacts in FY2013

VisualHighlights

Visual Division Highlights Report FY2013

In FY2013, the Utah Division of State History aimed to positively impact communities throughout Utah by assisting developers, agencies, communities, architects, archaeologists, researchers, genealogists, law enforcement, Certified Local Governments, homeowners, teachers, students, and the general public.

These reports show the impact of State History’s services on communities throughout Utah, on the economy, and on the general state of heritage and history in the state of Utah. State History’s programs–Antiquities, Historic Preservation, Library & Collections, and Public History seek to positively impact the communities and constituents they serve through free or easily-accessible services, and looks forward to another year of providing the services our communities need to thrive.

texthighlights

Text Only Division Highlights Report FY2013

  Please feel free to download this report in a text-only format, or a more compact, visual format.

Please note that both reports are .pdf documents and you will need Adobe Reader to download and read these reports. To get a free copy of Adobe Reader, click here.