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Utah Historical Quarterly Current Issue


Volume 83, Number 3 (Summer Issue):


Published since 1928, the Utah Historical Quarterly is the state’s premier history journal and the source for reliable, engaging Utah history. Join the Historical Society for your own copy.

Each issue of the Utah Historical Quarterly is accompanied with rich web supplements that introduce readers to sources, photos, interviews, and other engaging material. These “extras” are located at history.utah.gov/uhqextras.

WEB EXTRAS: See here 


IN THIS ISSUE


ARTICLES

The Russian Molokans of Park Valley
By Marshall E. Bowen

The Uncompahgre Reservation and the Hill Creek Extension
By Kathryn L. MacKay

Women Inventors in Utah Territory
By Christine Cooper-Rompato

The Carol Carlisle Summer Wedding Dress Collection
A Photo Essay

Found: Rare First Edition of the Earliest Ute and Shoshone Vocabulary
By Richard E. Turley Jr. and Brent M. Rogers


In 1976, the Utah State Historical Society published The Peoples of Utah, a groundbreaking work edited by Helen Z. Papanikolas. In it, Papanikolas and others conveyed the breadth of Utah’s past by recounting the history of some of the state’s ethnic groups—the “pioneers of many cultural strains.” This year, the historical society is revisiting the question of diversity in Utah with an annual conference focused on the theme of “Deep Roots, Many Voices: Exploring Utah’s Multicultural Past.” The summer 2015 issue of Utah Historical Quarterly is part of that exploration.

The arid, expansive landscape of western Box Elder County was once home to an unlikely group of settlers: members of the Russian nonconformist sect known as the Molokans. Persecuted in their own land, the Molokans scouted for places to live in North America, eventually coming in the thousands to California, Arizona, Mexico, Washington State, and—for a time—Park Valley, Utah. In the mid-1910s, at least twenty-seven Molokan families settled and stayed there for a year or more. The opening article in this issue brings the insights of geography to the account of the Park Valley Molokans and traces the experiences of five families before and after their sojourn in Utah. Though the Molokans might have seemed homogenous to outsiders, Marshall E. Bowen writes that “they did not all worship in the same way,” and they followed “diverse paths” throughout their lives.

In another corner of the state, Ute bands in Utah occupied the Uintah Reservation, created in 1861, while Utes in Colorado were removed to the adjacent Uncompahgre Reservation near the Green and White rivers. Reservation lands represented a fraction of the Northern Utes’ aboriginal territory. Still, no sooner had Congress created the Uncompahgre Reservation for Colorado Utes in 1882 that it also begin to consider dividing reservation lands into private land holdings—allotments—for individual Indians. In 1897, Congress opened unalloted lands of the Uncompahgre Reservation to white entry. Our second article details the twentieth-century struggle of the Ute people to win back lands within the boundaries of the 1882 Uncompahgre Reservation. Although the Hill Creek Extension—passed by the Congress in 1948—did not return to the Utes the full acreage, the addition represented a hard-won victory for Utes and employees of the Bureau of Indian Affairs working to undo the damage that opening the reservation had on the tribe and its traditions.

Much of the scholarship about nineteenth-century American women considers their place in the so-called public and private spheres, or, put differently, how society limited the activities of women. The third article adds to the discussion by approaching the past with a specific question: how many women in Utah Territory were granted patents in their own names. It finds that five Utah women successfully patented an invention during this era. The inventions were as individual as their creators, and they serve as evidence that at least some Utah women participated in the world of nineteenth-century business and that a host of people laid the foundations of modern Utah.

The cover of this issue features the wedding dresses of a great-aunt, a mother, and her daughter, material representations of the lives of three women from three disparate moments in the twentieth century. The issue’s fourth piece tells the stories behind these and other dresses that belong to the Carol Carlisle Summer Collection—a group of objects and documents that provides a glimpse into more than one hundred years of history of an extended family.

From material evidence about the lives of women we move to a recently rediscovered artifact of Native-white interactions in territorial Utah. Dimick B. Huntington was a nineteenth-century Mormon missionary with a skill for regional Native languages; in 1853, Huntington prepared and published a Ute and Shoshone vocabulary. For some time, this 1853 edition of the vocabulary was believed to be no longer extant. The final piece in the issue tells the story of how it resurfaced.


BOOK REVIEWS

Paul T. Nelson, Wrecks of Human Ambition: A History of Utah’s Canyon Country to 1936. Reviewed by Robert S. McPherson

Michael L. Tate, ed. The Great Medicine Road: Narratives of the Oregon, California, and the Mormon Trails. Reviewed by F. Ross Peterson

Julie Debra Neuffer, Helen Andelin and the Fascinating Womanhood Movement. Reviewed by Charlotte Hansen Terry

Susan E. Gray and Gayle Gullett, eds. Continent Maps: Rethinking Western Women’s History and the North American West. Reviewed by Stephanie Fuglaar Statz

Michael W. Homer, Joseph’s Temples: The Dynamic Relationship between Freemasonry and Mormonism. Reviewed by Brady G. Winslow

BOOK NOTICES

Gerald R. Clark, Supplying Custer: The Powder River Supply Depot, 1876

Dick Johnston, Won’t Quit: An Escalante Love Story

Norma R. Dalton and Alene Dalton, Images of America: Nine Mile Canyon

Julius C. Birge and Barbara B. Birge, The Awakening of the Desert: An Adventure-Filled Memoir of the Old West

Linda Dunning, Away from the Fold: An Encyclopedia of Utah Performers, vols. 1 and 2

 

 

2015 Utah State History Conference

Mark your calendars and please join us!

The 63rd Annual Utah State History Conference
Deep Roots, Many Voices;  Exploring Utah’s Multicultural Past

Thursday, October 1, 2105
Workshops at the Rio Grande Depot

Friday, October 2, 2015
History sessions at the Utah Cultural Celebration Center in West Valley City.

Tours to be announced shortly!

RSVP for the annual conference now!

A conference schedule is now available.

 

Utah Historical Quarterly Winter 2015


Volume 83, Number 1 (Winter Issue):


Utah’s history is more diverse than you think! Check out the Winter 2015 issue of the Utah Historical Quarterly to learn more about where Utah has been, and how we’ve come to where we are today. Join the Historical Society for your own copy .

Each issue of the Utah Historical Quarterly is accompanied with rich web supplements that introduce readers to sources, photos, interviews, and other engaging material. These “extras” are located at history.utah.gov/uhqextras.

WEB EXTRAS: See here 


IN THIS ISSUE


Winter-2015-UHQ-CoverGOLDWEBARTICLES

Neither Poet nor Prophet: S. George Ellsworth and the History of Utah
By Robert E. Parson

Charcoal and Its Role in Utah Mining History
By Douglas H. Page Jr., Sarah E. Page, Thomas J. Straka, and Nathan D. Thomas

The Chocolate Dippers’ Strike of 1910
By Kathryn L. MacKay

Tooele, Touch Typing, and the Catholic Saint Marguerite-Marie Alacoque
By Emma Louise Penrod

Transformation of the Cathedral: An Interview with Gregory Glenn
By Gary Topping


Charcoal burners, “chocolate girls,” Catholic priests, and a champion typist: these are a few of the characters who populate this issue of UtahHistorical Quarterly. That contemporary historians consider such individuals worthy of study stems, in part, from the new social history of the 1960s and beyond. This school of thought challenged the “consensus” history that had emphasized common American values and character over ethnic, racial, and class distinctions. In the words of the historian Alice Kessler-Harris, the new social history documented “social relationships, social structure, everyday life, private life, social solidarities, social conflicts, social classes, and social groups.”[1] In short, over the years, it has provided a more complete view of the past.

S. George Ellsworth, the subject of our first article, was a leading practitioner of this “new” history. Ellsworth obtained graduate training under Herbert Eugene Bolton at the University of California– Berkeley and spent his entire career at Utah State University. A bibliophile, he made important contributions to bolstering USU’s collection of what he called Utahnalia. Unlike the better-known Leonard Arrington, with whom he shared an intimate but at times strained relationship, Ellsworth was not a prolific scholar. Detailed and thoughtful, he labored fifteen years on Utah’s Heritage, a seventh-grade history textbook. Robert Parson guides readers in an intimate introduction to a master teacher and gifted, if at time conflicted, scholar who merits broader recognition for his contributions to Utah history. The other articles in this issue reflect Ellsworth’s dedication to telling lesser-known stories.

With our second article, a team of foresters and archaeologists have set out to remind Utahns of the place of charcoal in their state’s mining history. For many reasons, charcoal was a preferred source of heat in smelting; it was, therefore, critical to the mining industry. From whence, then, did smelters obtain the charcoal they needed to operate? The authors of this article have answered this question by documenting the remains of charcoal production sites throughout the state, as well as sites in Colorado and Wyoming associated with Utah mining. They are careful, too, to remind readers of the devastation caused by the charcoal industry: in the lives of the poorly paid, poorly housed charcoal burners; for the Native Americans whose food source the industry decimated; and, not least, in the forests altered by heavy, careless logging.

The back cover of this issue features a commercial photograph of chocolate boxes from the J. G. McDonald Company. The message presented by these boxes is overwhelmingly one of beauty, elegance, and, above all, femininity. As our third article establishes, such a message belied the realities of life for the young women who worked at McDonald’s confectionery. In 1910, fourteen of those women formed a “Chocolate Dippers’ Union” and struck for higher wages. These women—all of whom were younger than twenty-five and all of whom lost their jobs—acted bravely and with few precedents close at hand. Though only the names of the Chocolate Dippers’ Union’s officers survive, that fragment of history provides a fascinating glimpse into their world: all five of the officers came from the homes of working-class English immigrants, converts to Mormonism.

The last two pieces in this issue remind us of Utah’s deep Catholic roots. Emma Louise Penrod probes into the naming of Tooele’s Saint Marguerite Catholic Church, skeptical that a church in a Utah town with almost no French roots derived its name from the French Saint Marguerite-Marie Alacoque. She was right. The Marguerite in question was in fact a young Irish American girl, the niece of Frank McGurrin—a celebrated typist who helped popularize the QWERTY keyboard and nurtured the Catholic Church in Tooele. The article segues into a discussion of ethnicity and religion in small mining towns, like those close to Tooele, and the odd connection of the Catholic parish to the origins of modern touch typing. The final piece features a delightful conversation between the historian Gary Topping and Gregory Glenn, the founder and director of the Madeleine Choir School in Salt Lake City.

[1] Alice Kessler-Harris, “Social History,” in The New American History, ed. Eric Foner (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1997), 232.


BOOK REVIEWS

David M. Wrobel, Global West, American Frontier: Travel, Empire, and Exceptionalism from Manifest Destiny to the Great Depression. Reviewed by Michael Homer

Claudine Chalmers, Chronicling the West for Harper’s: Coast to Coast with Frenzeny and Tavernier in 1873–1874. Reviewed by Noel A. Carmack

Samuel Holiday and Robert S. McPherson, Under the Eagle: Samuel Holiday, Navajo Code Talker. Reviewed by Robert S. Voyles

Roger L. Nichols, Warrior Nations: The United States and Indian Peoples. Reviewed by Patricia Ann Owens

Norman Rosenblatt, Dance with the Bear: The Joe Rosenblatt Story. Reviewed by Allan Kent Powell

Merina Smith, Revelation, Resistance, and Mormon Polygamy: The Introduction and Implementation of the Principle, 1830–1853. Reviewed by Todd M. Compton

BOOK NOTICES

Mike Mackey, Protecting Wyoming’s Share: Frank Emerson and the Colorado River Compact

Aaron McArthur, St. Thomas, Nevada: A History Uncovered

Evelyn I. Funda, Weeds: A Farm Daughter’s Lament