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Utah’s Latest Additions to the National Register

Check out the latest historic buildings in Utah listed on the National Register of Historic Places: George & Ellen Furgis House, Salt Lake City; Salt Lake Country Club & Golf Course, Salt Lake City; Marsac Elementary School (amended nomination), Park City; Ogden Union Stockyard Exchange Building; Ogden; and Carhart Pueblo, San Juan County.


George & Ellen Furgis House
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah

UT_Salt Lake County_Furgis George and Ellen House_0001 (Medium)Statement of Significance:
The George and Ellen Furgis House, constructed in 1965, in Salt Lake City, Utah, is a one-story International Style modern residence. The building is locally significant under Criterion C in the area of Architecture for its unique and distinctive design and association with prominent Salt Lake City architect Eduard Dreier. The Furgis House is an excellent and rare example of a mid-century International style residential design in Salt Lake City. The Furgis House has the horizontality, lack of decoration, visible structural components, glazed curtain walls allowing views of a natural landscape, and modern interior elements that closely reflect the influence of the International Style of architecture.

The architect Eduard Dreier was born in 1926 in Bern, Switzerland. He attended architecture school and worked at top firms in Zurich, Switzerland, until he immigrated to the United States with his parents in June of 1949. Eduard worked with local firms for a few years and then branched out into his own residential practice. His designs were almost exclusively influenced by the International Style of Mies van der Rohe and other Bauhaus architects.

Eduard Dreier was one of only a few Salt Lake City architects who designed International Style-influenced buildings. He was also one of two who extensively specialized in modern style residential architecture, and the only one who designed Miesian-influenced International Style residences.
Among many his many residences, Ed Dreier only designed four similar houses in Salt Lake City. The Furgis House is the only residence among those four that retains its original interior and exterior. The Furgis house is a unique and significant contributing architectural resource.

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George & Ellen Furgis House


Salt Lake Country Club & Golf Course
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah

Statement of Significance: UT_Salt Lake County_Salt Lake CC&GC_0012 (Medium)
The Salt Lake Country Club & Golf Course site is significant under Criteria A and C. The period of significance for the site begins in 1905 with the opening of the course and clubhouse and ends in 1924, when the property changed from private to municipal ownership and its uses and role in the local community were fundamentally altered; the site still reflects the clubhouse and course as they were during the period of significance. Under Criterion A, the primary criterion of significance, the clubhouse and golf course have statewide significance in the area of Social History for their direct association with the development of a leisure class and social clubs in Utah and the area of Recreation and Entertainment for the introduction of golf to the state as a new form of recreation (i.e., the theme of recreation and entertainment). Completed in 1905, the golf course and clubhouse served as a key gathering place for Salt Lake City’s business, political, and social leaders and venue for a majority of the community’s “high society” events. The Salt Lake Country Club, with its clubhouse and golf course in Forest Dale, appears to be the first recreation-specific social organization in the state as well as being among the first social clubs in Utah to allow equal access to women and men. The golf course stands today as the oldest course in Utah and the first formal course in the state. The course clubhouse represents the first golf-specific clubhouse constructed in Utah.

The clubhouse is also significant under Criterion C as a rare example of historical Mission Revival style architecture in Salt Lake City. While smaller and less stylized examples of the style can be found in the residential architecture of the Salt Lake Valley, the clubhouse is one of a very few large, non-residential buildings to exhibit the full range of features associated with Mission Revival style architecture. Finally, the clubhouse is significant under Criterion C for its association with vaunted local architect Frederic Albert Hale, who designed the clubhouse and is noted for his work on many of Salt Lake City’s most iconic buildings. Hale fundamentally changed the architectural landscape of Salt Lake City with his work on public buildings, and his work on the Salt Lake Country Club clubhouse is no exception.

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Salt Lake Country Club & Golf Course


Marsac Elementary School (amended)
Park City, Summit County, Utah

UT_Summit County_Marsac Elementary_0001 (Medium)Statement of Significance:
Because the original nomination did not include significance criteria, areas of significance, or a period of significance, they are being included with the additional documentation. However, no additional information for the statement of significance is being added. The Marsac Elementary School is significant under Criteria A in the areas of Politics/Government and Social History. The period of significance is 1936-1965, which corresponds with the construction of the original building and the end of the historic era (50 years ago). The building was continuously used for the same purpose through the period of significance

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Marsac Elementary School AD


Ogden Union Stockyard Exchange Building
Ogden, Weber County

Statement of Significance: 001 (Medium)
The Ogden Union Stockyard Exchange Building, constructed in 1931, is locally significant under Criteria A and C. The period of significance dates from the original construction of 1931, to 1965, the end of the historic era. Under Criterion A, it is significant in the areas of Agriculture and Commerce, for its association with the economic success of Ogden in the livestock industry. Ogden is known for the contribution it made to the rail industry, yet it should also be known for the important contribution it made in the area of livestock trade, particularly between the years 1920 and 1960. After 1960, Ogden began losing its strength as being the top shipping center for cattle, as more slaughter houses were moving closer to where cattle were being raised. Construction of the building began in September of 1930 and was completed in 1931. The Exchange Building was used for many years as the offices of the Ogden Union Stockyards and many other agricultural businesses. When the stockyards were no longer used for livestock the Exchange Building was adapted for use as a trade school, a drug and alcohol rehabilitation center and, within the last few years, a haunted house attraction.

The Exchange Building is also significant under Criterion C in the area of Architecture, for embodying the distinctive characteristics of the Art Deco architecture movement as interpreted by noted Ogden architect, Leslie S. Hodgson. Hodgson was one of the most influential architects within the community and conceived the three most significant Art Deco-style buildings in Utah, the US Forest Service building ( NRIS #06000432), Ogden Municipal Building (NRIS #83003202) and at the pinnacle of his career, Ogden High School (NRIS #83003201). Although not as elaborately rendered as these buildings, the Ogden Union Exchange Building is still an excellent example of Hodgson’s local interpretation of the Art Deco style and truly is a significant and contributing historic building in Ogden.

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Ogden Union Stockyard Exchange Bldg


Carhart Pueblo
San Juan County

UT_San Juan County_Carhart Pueblo_0003 (Medium)Statement of Significance:
Carhart Pueblo includes a Chaco-style great house with a blocked-in kiva, a great kiva, earthen berms, surrounding roomblocks, and a possible prehistoric road segment, indicating the site’s connection with Chaco Canyon to the south (Baxter 2010). Carhart’s occupation from the early Pueblo II through Pueblo III periods (ca. A.D. 1040-1140), makes it one of the earliest Chaco outliers known in the northern San Juan region. Additionally, the site’s location in southeastern Utah makes it one of the most northerly great house communities identified (Lekson 1984; Van Dyke 2003). The well-preserved site illustrates the cultural development of ancestral Puebloan peoples in the northern San Juan region during an important time of community establishment and integration into the Chaco system (Lipe et al. 1999). As one of the earliest and most northerly great house communities, Carhart Pueblo provides important evidence about the nature of the developing Chaco system and the extent of involvement and integration into the system by outlying communities (Baxter 2010; Van Dyke 2003). Carhart Pueblo is therefore significant at the national level and has a period of significance dating between A.D. 1040 and 1140. Under Criterion C, it is significant in the area of Community Planning and Development for embodying the distinctive architectural features and characteristics of a Chacoan great house outlier community. Under Criterion D it is significant in the areas of Prehistoric Archeology and Religion (under Criteria Consideration A). Carhart Pueblo has provided and could continue to provide important information regarding early Chacoan outlier community establishment and organization, architectural construction techniques and styles, changing subsistence practices, and ancestral Puebloan ceremonial practices and beliefs. Carhart is an estimated 90% intact and represents an excellent example of a northern, early Chacoan outlier community (Baxter 2010; Mills 2002).

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Carhart Pueblo


The National Register of Historic Places is the official federal list of properties that are significant in American history, architecture, archaeology, or engineering.

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