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Building Rehabilitation Information

Rush-Valley-House

Someone once lived in this house in Rush Valley, Utah….

Here are some links and tools to help you as you begin work on your historic building.

See also our resources for commercial buildings.

Rehab Dos and Don’ts
Some basics for sprucing up your historic home.

Rehab for Dummies (PDF)
Guidance for those who are new to the world of house rehabilitation. This article, by J. Scott Anderson and Craig Paulsen, is from Volume 5 of Utah Preservation magazine.

The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation

Inspection Checklist for Historic Buildings (PDF)
A worksheet approach for property owners evaluating the condition of buildings.

National Trust for Historic Preservation Weatherization Guide for Older and Historic Buildings

Don’t Get Nailed
Contractor and lien information from the Utah Department of Occupational & Professional Licensing.

Windows for Historic Buildings 
Repair or replace? Answers to common questions.

Shingles Standards
Standards from the Secretary of Interior.

Bracing for the Big One
Information to help you plan and carry out a seismic upgrade while preserving the important features and character of your historic house.

Old House Journal
 website
A magazine covering a wide arrange of preservation topics.

Traditional Building
 website 
Information on suppliers of traditionally styled products and related services.

NPS Preservation Briefs
Technical publications covering a wide variety of preservation topics.

NPS Technical Preservation Online Education website
A source of extensive information on technical issues.

Restoration Reports
Inexpensive and very thorough guides to various rehab topics.

Commerical/Public Buildings

Signs and Awnings for Downtowns (PDF)
A workbook for business and property owners.

Restoring an Historic Commercial Building (PDF)
A workbook for business and property owners.

Adapting for Access: ADA Compliance in Historic Structures (PDF)
A brochure that dispels myths and shows that it is possible and reasonable to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) while remaining in your historic structure and retaining its historic significance.