Skip to content
Secondary Content

Upcoming Events

Fourth Annual UEN American Indian Film Festival
November 2014

UDIA - UEN Film Festival LogoThis month UEN partners with colleges and universities across the state, for a month-long festival of independent films produced by and about American Indians and Alaskan Natives. We’re pleased to share these quality stories of tribal nations and community beliefs, culture, and history with Utah learners of all ages. Film screenings are in-person and find more indigenous programming throughout the month on UEN-TV and now 24 hours a day and 7 days a week on our new channel, FNX!

 

For the Generations: Native Story & Performance

Co-produced by Oregon Public Broadcasting (OPB) and Painted Sky, For The Generations: Native Story & Performance combines original performance footage and the artists’ own words to tell the performers’ stories, creating a narrative that is both gritty and beautiful in the artistry it showcases.  The documentary travels agross the country and to Canada to capture the artists’ performances.  Featured artists include award-winning pop-diva Jana Mashonee (Lumbee); classically trained ballet dancers Michael Greyeyes (Cree) and Santee Smith (Mohawk); Grammy winners Robert Mirabal (Taos Pueblo) and Bill Miller (Mohican); R&B songstress Martha Redbone (Choctaw/Shawnee/Cherokee); and Painted Sky’s own Northstar dancers.

The documentary also explores the performers’ efforts to instill cultural pride and identity in Native youth, who face challenges such as diabetes and depression.  The film also examines the performers’ own efforts to overcome Native American stereotypes in television, cinema, and dance.

November 10, 2014 – 7:00 PM
Southern Utah University
Sharwan Smith Center, Room 161 D
351 W. University Blvd, Cedar City, UT

 

Healing the Warriors Heart

Healing the Warrior’s Heart examines the emotional trauma of war through the prism of Native American tradition and ceremony. The program reveals the central role that military service plays in Native life and explores the spiritual traditions that help returning American Indian soldiers reintegrate into society. These traditions hold lessons for the nation as we seek to bring comfort and healing to veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan who suffer from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, or PTSD.

November 11, 2014 – 5:00 PM
University of Utah
A. Ray Olpin Union Building, Union Theatre
200 S. Central Campus Drive, Salt Lake City, UT

 

Up Heartbreak Hill

Thomas and Tamara are track stars at their rural New Mexico high school.  Like many teenagers, they are torn between the lure of brighter college futures elsewhere and the ties that bind them to home. For these teens, however, home is an impoverished town on the Navajo reservation, and leaving means separating from family, tradition and the land that has been theirs for generations.  Erica Scharf’s Up Heartbreak Hill is a moving look at high school graduation for a new generation of Americans struggling to be both Native and modern.

A co-production of Long Distance Films, Native American Public Telecommunications, ITVS, POV’s Diverse Voices Project and New Mexico PBS, with funding provided by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.  A co-presentation with Native American Public Telecommunications.

November 11, 2014 – 7:00 PM
University of Utah
A. Ray Olpin Union Building, Union Theatre
200 S. Central Campus Drive, Salt Lake City, UT

November 12, 2014 – 7:00 PM
Utah State University Eastern Blanding Campus
Blanding Arts & Events Center
576 W. 200 S. Blanding, UT   

November 13, 2014 – 7:00 PM
Utah State University – Logan, UT
Taggart Student Center, 2nd Floor Auditorium

November 18, 2014 – 6:00 PM
Salt Lake Community College, South City Campus
Center for Arts & Media, Multi-Purpose Room
1575 S. State Street
Salt Lake City, UT

 

Run To The East

News headlines all over the West reinforce negative stereotypes of Native Americans. They live in communities associated with drug use, alcoholism, and random acts of violence. In these societies defined by loss, a lack of infrastructure, substandard education, and addiction have led to despair. But that isn’t the entire story. A pocket of hope lies in the sport of running. Endurance running has long been a key spiritual element of Native American cultures—one through which individuals can demonstrate strength and resilience. Its importance has declined as modern problems have emerged, but many still preach its benefits. Through endurance running the next generation can learn mental toughness, the value of proper nutrition, and the gratification that comes from winning.

Can these high school seniors use running to beat the odds and earn a scholarship to a prestigious college?

November 14, 2014 – 7:00 PM
Utah Valley University
Student Center, Rooms 206 A,B & C
800 W. University Parkway, Orem, UT

 

 

Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope Translated into the Navajo Language
November 18, 2014 – 7:00 p.m.

Nineteen years after the formation of the Empire, Luke Skywalker is thrust into the struggle of the Rebel Alliance when he meets Obi-Wan Kenobi, who has lived for years in seclusion on the desert planet of Tatooine. Obi-Wan begins Luke’s Jedi training as Luke joins him on a daring mission to rescue the beautiful Rebel leader Princess Leia from the clutches of the evil Empire. Although Obi-Wan sacrifices himself in a lightsaber duel with Darth Vader, his former apprentice, Luke proves that the Force is with him by destroying the Empire’s dreaded Death Star.

November 18, 2014 – 7:00 PM
Utah Valley University
Student Center, Rooms 206 A,B & C
800 W. University Parkway, Orem, UT

 

 

School, Public and Tribal Libraries Honor Native American Heritage Month – November 2014

The Utah Division of Indian Affairs joined forces with the Utah State Library Division to offer 19 mini grants of up to $1,000 to help public libraries, school libraries, and tribal libraries enhance their educational activities associated with American Indian Heritage Month during the month of November 2014. The Indigenous Month Mini Grant was open to libraries in the State of Utah interested in holding educational events or activities that honor our American Indian heritage.

* Funds for this project have been provided by the Institute of Museum and Library Services through the Library Services and Technology Act, and are administered by the Utah State Library.

 

*Celebrate Indigenous Month at the American Indian Heritage Open House
Tooele, UT – November 10, 2014

The open House is an educational, family-friendly event featuring authentic Native American display, demonstrations, story-telling, dance, hands-on craft activities, music and other attractions that showcase the role of American Indians in the past and current history and culture of Utah and beyond.  This is FREE and open to the public.

The program will take place at the Dow Jones Complex, 438 West 400 North in Tooele, Utah.  For more information, please contact Marney Zambrano at 801-833-1961 or mzambrano@tooeleschools.com.

 

*White Mesa Library’s Indigenous Day Celebration
White Mesa, UT – November 12, 2014

The Ute Mountain Ute tribe is hosting a health fair from 9:00-2:00 PM at the Community Center.  Bring the family for an afternoon of storytelling and basket making at the Education Center.  The storytelling and basket making activities will begin at 4:00 PM.  The Education Center is located at 33 Mesa View Drive in White Mesa, Utah.

For more information, please contact Dan Raisor at 435-678-2035 or draison@utemountain.org.

 

*Native American Culture Night
Washington, UT – November 13, 2014

Glenn Rogers, a member of the Shiviwitz Tribal Council will present a program on the history and culture of the Paiute Indians in Southern Utah.  This program will be held on Thursday, November 13th at the Washington Branch Library, located at 220 North 300 East in Washington, Utah.  The program will start at 7:00 PM.

For more information, please contact the Washington Branch Library at 435-627-2706.

 

*Celebrating Indigenous Month: Celebrating Cedar City’s Heritage and Culture
Cedar City, UT – November 20, 2014

Celebrating Cedar City’s Heritage and Culture is an educational, family-friendly event featuring Shannon Martineau, member of the Paiute Tribes of Utah, will share the tribe’s creation story at the Restoration Monument in front of the Cedar City Library.  Ms. Martineau will also  explain the Paiute Tribe’s written language and its correlation with their sign language.  Children will also have an opportunity to  create their own petroglyphs.

The program will take place at the Cedar City Public Library located at 303 North 100 East in Cedar City, Utah.  For more information, please contact Lauren McAfee at 435-586-6661 or laurenz@cedarcity.org.

 

*One County, One Book: Native American Dance Workshop
West Jordan, UT – November 22, 2014

One County, One Book: Native American Dance Workshop is an educational, family-friendly event where anyone can learn powwow and hoop dancing.  In addition to learning these traditional dances, participants will learn about the history behind these traditional dances.  **The first 100 families will receive a book of Native American stories.**

The event is taking place at the Viridian Event Center located at 8030 South 1825 West in West Jordan, Utah.  For more information, please contact Liesl Seborg at lseborg@slcolibrary.org.

 

2014 UVU Contest Powwow – Orem, UT
November 15, 2014UDIA - NAHM-2014UVU Powwow Flyer

Utah Valley University
Student Center Grande Ballroom
800 W. University Parkway
Orem, UT 84058

Grand Entry: 12:00 PM & 6:00 PM

Master of Ceremonies: Bart Powaukee (Nez Perce/Ute)
Spiritual Advisor: Winston Mason (Hidatsa/Mandan)
Arena Director: Joseph Baldwin (Shoshone Bannock)
Head Drum Judge: A.J. Kanip
Head Man: Shane Etsitty (Diné)
Head Lady: Lahoma Scabby (Pima-Maricopa)

General Admission: $5.00
Admission with Student ID: $4:00
Free: 65+ and children 5 years and under

 

The Navajo Long Walk Re-enactment – Blanding, UT
November 17, 2014 – 8:30 AMUDIA - NAHM-Long Walk 2014

The re-enactment of the Long Walk of the Navajo has become a yearly event for fifth grade students at Blanding Elementary School. Participating students get to experience what life was like for the many Navajo’s who had to endure this humiliation.

In preparation for the Long Walk event, fifth grade teacher Robert Turk, teaches students about the history, suffering, and hardships of the Long Walk. In addition, students are required to do a project about the Long Walk. This event kicks off Heritage Week at Blanding Elementary School.

Students and participants will walk to West Water, a small Navajo community, where they will make frybread and enjoy lunch with community members and hear stories from a Navajo elder. This event is free and open to the public, for more information, please contact Clayton Long, Bilingual Education Director, at (435) 678-1251 or clong@sanjuanschools.org.

 

American Indian Stories through Dance – Spanish Fork, UT
November 20, 2014 – 6:00 PM

An entertaining and educational evening for Spanish Fork 4th and 7th grade students and their families, will include: A Native American Drum Group, Wasatch Eagles dance group and Native Artists with cradle boards, teepees and other crafts. The evening will give students and their families’ hands on experience with Native American Crafts, hear stories and see dances of Native Americans, from this area. They will feel the beat of the drums and a sense of being a part of Indian life.

Larsen Elementary School
1175 E. Flonette Drive
Spanish Fork, UT 84660

Dinner will be served from 6:00 pm – 6:30 pm
*Dinner includes indian Taco $5.00 and a drink $1.00.
Performance begins at 6:30 pm

Contact the Title VII office at email: eileen.quintana@nebo.edu, natalie.billie@nebo.edu or carol.huntington@nebo.edu Larsen Elementary Library.

* All dinner proceeds will be used for Scholarships, for Nebo Graduating Seniors.