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Category Archives: Arts & Museums

Two Unique Photographers Featured in New Alice Gallery Exhibition

A new exhibit at the Alice Gallery in Salt Lake City will highlight two artists taking unconventional approaches to photography.

The Utah Division of Arts & Museums presents On the Border of Realism September 14 through November 2, 2018, at the Alice Gallery. A Gallery Stroll artist reception will be held on October 19 from 6pm to 9pm. The Alice Gallery is located at the historic Glendinning Mansion at 617 East South Temple in Salt Lake City and is free and open to the public Tuesday through Friday 10 am to 4 pm.

On the Border of Realism features the artwork of Jan Andrews and Trent Alvey. These artists are inspired by capturing the transitory moments of everyday life, the movement of light, and the impressions these illuminated scenes leave on the senses. Both use photography as their medium, but use different subject matter for inspiration. Alvey photographs water mixing with paint in a paint tray, while Andrews photographs flowers through hazy greenhouse windows. Alvey watches the movement of grass, clouds, light, water — non-linear occurrences — that come into existence only for a moment because they are as transparent as any emotion or fleeting thought that passes through our mind every day.

“Water is the medium that is most important as it finds its way to low places,” Alvey said about the collection of work featured in this exhibit. This is her favorite way to observe, having no notion of what may occur or where or even the expectation that something will occur and if it does will she even notice.

Andrews said the visual arts, particularly photography, is dependent upon the movements of particles of light to illuminate the object or the scene which is then impressed upon the senses then conveyed and lodged for contemplation. In these photographs Andrews attempts to make visible the interior of a greenhouse and the almost indistinguishable plants as seen through the hazy glass windows in late afternoon.

“The images of the flowers inside are illuminated as merely imprints or shadows of their original shapes and colors,” Andrews said.

The Alice gallery hosts exhibitions by living Utah artists as well as works from the State of Utah Alice Merrill Horne Collection.The Rio & Alice Galleries were established as a free service to Utah artists and surrounding communities. These venues allow emerging artists, professional artists, and curators to collaborate in the process of exhibition-making as well as engage the community through thoughtful and innovative art-making and dialogue.

Spike 150 Grant Opportunities

On May 10th, 1869, the Transcontinental Railroad was completed at Promontory Point in Northern Utah.  In recognition of the sesquicentennial of the 1869 Transcontinental Railroad’s completion in Utah, funding for railroad-related projects is now available through the Department of Heritage & Arts.

Three categories of grants are available:

  1. Spike 150 Cultural Celebration Grants – Funding for Utah arts, cultural, history, and humanities-based organizations, and local communities, to plan celebratory events, exhibits, festivals, performances, or programs around the sesquicentennial commemorating event.
    Guidelines  |  Online Application
  2. Railroad Depot Upgrade Grants – Funding for Utah historic railroad depots that serve as museums or visitor information centers in order to enhance the historic appearance and functionality of the railroad depot to support the Anniversary. Preference will be given to projects that contribute to the long-term maintenance and preservation of the historic railroad depot.
    Guidelines Online Application
  3. Local History Grants – Funding for Utah communities and organizations to include Transcontinental Railroad or general railroad history in their 2019 programming. These can include public education activities, exhibits, research, events, and presentations related to the topic of railroads in Utah.
    Guidelines  |  Online Application

Eligible applicants include nonprofit organizations, schools, local historical societies, arts and cultural organizations, museums, libraries, local governments, and others. Topics and subjects related to this event may include, but are not limited to: transportation, travel, industry, technology, infrastructure, innovation, immigrant & labor issues, impact on Indigenous peoples,  environmental issues, globalization, historical figures & stories, related geographic locales,Transcontinental Railroad routes, westward expansion, social & economic impacts, etc.

Grant funding is provided by the State of Utah. Grants are competitive and panel-reviewed. Grant applications are due August 3rd, 2018. Grantees will have between September 1, 2018-December 31, 2019 to complete their project.

For more information, please contact:
Racquel Cornali, 801-236-7541 or
rcornali@utah.gov
Rachel Cook, 801-715-6722 or rcook@utah.gov
Alena Franco, 801-245-7233 or afranco@utah.gov.


Logos
Grantees are required to use both the Spike 150 and Department of Heritage & Arts logo on all publicity for their events.
Spike150 Logo Department of Heritage & Arts Logo

Arts Project A or B

To enable organizations and groups, whose primary mission may or may not be the arts, to develop and provide unique arts-based projects for the general public. Project B activities must occur between Jan 1 – June 30, 2019.  Funding Range: $500 to $2,000

Arts Project B will open August 6, 2018

Deadline: October 5, 2018 at 5:00 p.m. MST

Guidelines   Apply  Budgets 

Folk Arts Funding

Folk Arts Preservation Grant Guidelines
Folk Arts Cultural Preservation Grants assist individual artists, organizations, and cultural communities in the documentation, preservation, and presentation of traditional art forms. Funds up to: $1,500. Deadline for BOTH grants: September 14, 2018 at 5:00 p.m. MST

Folk Arts Apprenticeship Grant  Guidelines
Folk Arts Apprenticeship scholarships support master folk artists to work with an apprentice. Funds up to $3,000.
Apply Now  Guidelines-Preservation  Guidelines-Apprenticeship

OnStage In Utah

Competitive funding available to presenters to support a public performance as well as a separate community engagement activity.  Funding can be awarded for performances of in-state or out-of-state artists. Funding Range: 50% of artists fees up to $2,000. This application is now closed.

Deadline: Friday, Jun 22, 2018 at 5:00 PM MST

 Guidelines       Budget       Closed

Spike 150 Exhibition

Click here for full description and guidelines

*Please note that July 2nd is the deadline for artist ideas/proposals OR existing artworks.
Artist ideas/proposals are due July 2nd, with completed artworks due March 2019. 

On May 10th, 2019, the State of Utah and the Department of Heritage & Arts will commemorate the 150th anniversary marking the completion of the nation’s First Transcontinental Railroad. The joining of the Union Pacific and Central Pacific Railroads occurred at Promontory Summit, UT in 1869. As part of a host of Spike 150 activities aimed to inspire, educate, and reflect on this legacy, the Utah Division of Arts and Museums (UA&M), Rio Gallery (located in Salt Lake City), will be facilitating an exhibition March 22–June 14, 2019 on this topic. Funding is provided by the State of Utah, the Department of Heritage & Arts, the Utah Division of Arts & Museums, and the Spike 150 Commission.

This exhibition will include both invited artists & artists accepted via an open call process, and will include a side-by-side curatorial mentorship with one invited mentee from the community. Artists both curated and selected from the open call, will be paid for participation. Proposals for new work, as well as existing works that relate to the topic, will be accepted. Additionally, funding has been set aside for the acquisition of a limited number of works of art from this exhibition into the State of Utah Alice Merrill Horne Art Collection. 

The history of the First Transcontinental Railroad and its legacy in Utah provides ample topics for exploration and representation. Topics and subjects related to this event may include, but are not limited to: transportation, travel, industry, technology, infrastructure, innovation, immigrant and labor issues, impact on Indigenous peoples,  environmental issues, globalization, historical figures & stories, related geographic locales, Transcontinental Railroad routes, westward expansion, social and economic impacts, etc. We welcome any and all aesthetic explorations that relate to the topic.

A World Transformed: the Transcontinental Railroad and Utah

Curving Iron 333, Ten Mile Canyon, Courtesy of the Department of Special Collections, Stanford Libraries

Curving Iron 333, Ten Mile Canyon, Courtesy of the Department of Special Collections, Stanford Libraries

May 10, 2019 will mark the 150th anniversary of the completion of the first transcontinental railroad at Promontory Summit, Utah. Utahans played a major role in the completion of the railroad through investment, surveying, and labor. Depending on your viewpoint, the railroad changed Utah for both good and ill, but everyone would agree that the railroad brought significant cultural, economic, and environmental changes. Utah became more connected both economically and culturally with the rest of the nation. Eastern goods could be shipped quickly and cheaply to Utah and Utah products had a market with the rest of the nation. The railroad also brought changes at a personal level. A difficult journey of three months from Omaha, Nebraska to Salt Lake City, now took three days. Loved ones separated by the great distances of the continent could be reunited and Mormon converts and missionaries had a much easier and quicker journey to and from Utah.

Utah State University and the Utah State Division of History have partnered to create an exhibit, A World Transformed: the Transcontinental Railroad and Utah, which shares the personal stories of the people who built it and those whose lives were forever changed in both big ways and small. A World Transformed is a smaller version of an exhibit that will be displayed from February to June 2019 in the Utah State Capitol. It draws upon the many rich historical resources held by different institutions across Utah including photographs, maps, art, and lithographs.  It consists of six stand-alone banners.

Resources

2018-2019 Traveling Schedule

Tooele Junior High, Mar 13 – Apr 15, 2018
Western Mining and Railroad Museum, Helper, Apr 25 – May 30