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Category Archives: Arts & Museums

Arrangements: A Survey of Utah Collage

Liberty Blake "The Meadow After the Climb" Collage 20" x 16"

Liberty Blake “The Meadow After the Climb” Collage 20″ x 16″

At its first formal beginnings, collage began as a startling intermingling of “high” culture – still life oil paintings – and “low” culture – mass produced paper prints and patterns. The practice of collage – sticking or pasting materials to a flat surface – has been around for centuries and was a favorite medium of folk and outsider artists. However, the flexibility of collage was perfect for Cubists and Dadaists to explore themes of chaos, imagination, absurdity, and reality during the period of time following World War I. Later, collage and photomontage became the perfect vessels for Pop and Modern artists to depict themes of consumerism, technology, militarism, and excess.

The beauty of collage is that it is so flexible. It is accessible and democratic in the sense that the creation of collage is available to anyone, from schoolchild to seasoned artist. However, collage as an art form is still largely governed by the same principles as other formal art making – form, structure, color, composition, and movement all weigh heavily in the creation of artistic collage.

This exhibition combines collage works from the State of Utah’s Fine Art Collection, as well as artwork from some of Utah’s finest collage and mixed media artists. Collage, assemblage, photomontage, and mixed media artists in Utah have a long and rich history of practice in Utah. We wanted to bring together the work of modern-day professionals and earlier practitioners of various forms of collage together in an exhibition we could share with people across the state. We hope that this assortment of works will inspire viewers to consider creating collage of their own, to explore their worlds and to think about the everyday materials around them that could be incorporated into their art-making.

Resources

  • Press release for your school or institution to distribute. For a press image click on the picture above and it will open in a new tab at a higher resolution.
  • Educational Materials

2017-2018 Traveling Schedule

Schedule posted June 2017

Go Out and Play: An Exhibit About Childhood Memories of Play

The Neighbors by Sophie Soprano, oil on panel, 16"x20"

The Neighbors by Sophie Soprano, oil on panel, 16″x20″

Memories of playing as a child are powerful. Children’s everyday experiences, adventures, and projects are often rehearsals for adult life. Play gives children a taste of freedom, encounters with uncertainty, risk taking, responsibility, and opportunities for unscheduled time for imagination. This exhibit focuses on artists’ memories to reignite the viewer’s own childhood markers of place and time. It aims to inspire parents, educators, and children to bring play back into their lives.

Collectively, this exhibit explores a changing world in which the role of play can sometimes seem trivialized.  As children spend more of their leisure time in front of screens, many American parents have begun seriously considering the role of play in their children’s routines. We are hoping this exhibition will invoke wonder, creativity, and natural curiosity in its viewers, and encourage them to go out and play.

“The exhibit focuses on reigniting the viewers’ own childhood through interaction and reminiscing,” says curator Kathy Cieslewicz. The exhibit displays artworks in a variety of mediums by artists from around the states of Utah and Arizona.

For more information on the Dixie State University Sears Art Museum Gallery visit searsart.com or like their Facebook page at www.facebook.com/SearsArtMuseumGallery.

Resources

  • Press release for your school or institution to distribute. For a press image click on the picture above and it will open in a new tab at a higher resolution.
  • Educational Materials

2017-2018 Traveling Schedule

Schedule posted June 2017

Vietnam Veterans: Art Beyond Combat

Carl Purcell, painting Daniel Maynard, drawing John Steele, photography

Carl Purcell, painting – Daniel Maynard, drawing – John Steele, photography

This exhibition features three artists who served in Vietnam. Each has a different perspective about war. Dan Maynard was an artist his entire life, but never did much with it until after he was encouraged by his wife. John Steele came to photography later in life, and it was photography that took him back to Vietnam, to revise his personal perspectives and what he thought he knew about the people and their country. Carl Purcell was an interrogator for the Air Force. What he learned about the attitudes of North Vietnamese soldiers was a fatalistic view of life that he didn’t want to share. When he returned, he didn’t allow the war to impinge on his desire to move forward in life and never look back.

These are images of war, images of peace, and images of healing. Their creators are men who served our country during a time of uncertainty, protest, anger, and devastation. Each artist has a different perspective on how to return to life and resolve feelings of unrest. Art serves each of them in a different way, and each has a different story to tell.

Beginning September 17 2017, PBS will air Ken Burns’ latest series, The Vietnam War. The series features testimony from nearly 100 witnesses, including many Americans who fought in the war and others who opposed it, as well as Vietnamese combatants and civilians from both sides. This exhibition, curated by KUED Channel 7, was made possible by a grant from WETA, the PBS producing station. To learn more about this documentary, visit pbs.org/vietnamwar

Resources

2017-2018 Traveling Schedule

Scheduled in June 2017

Cubanidad

Gini Pringle, Havana Style, Photograph, 24" x 28"

Gini Pringle, Havana Style, Photograph, 24″ x 28″

“Perhaps the mission of an artist is to interpret beauty to people – the beauty within themselves” – Langston Hughes

Cuba is home to a mixture of multiethnic influences and a long and complicated geopolitical history. This unique and complex blending has drawn visitors from all over the world to try to capture the true spirit of Cuba. Writers, poets, painters, photographers, musicians, actors, and artists of all sorts have traveled to and been born of a Cuba that has inspired and encouraged generations of artistic investigation and expression.

Cubanidad is the exploration and celebration of Cuban identity, and the people of Cuba have long been considered its greatest resource. These eight Utah artists visited Cuba and documented the people and culture – capturing cubanidad. This exhibition is made of works from their efforts to report and record what cubanidad might look like to one looking in from the outside. The exhibit includes artworks by, Niki Chan, Russel Albert Daniels, Bernardo Flores-Sahagun, Lewis Francis, J. Edgar Gomez, Gini Pringle, Jun Song, and Stephen Trimble.

Resources

  • Press release for your school or institution to distribute. For a press image click on the picture above and it will open in a new tab at a higher resolution.
  • Educational Materials

2017-2018 Traveling Schedule

Schedule posted June 2017

2017 Utah Watercolor Society

Rue La Boetie, France by Gail B. Wilhemsen, Watercolor 14" x 10"

Rue La Boetie, France by Gail B. Wilhemsen, Watercolor 14″ x 10″

The Utah Watercolor Society, a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization founded in 1974, is dedicated to the promotion and advancement of art through water media. UWS seeks to elevate water media and educate the public of its importance as a creative, permanent art medium. The Society encourages its members to develop artistically and creatively and to share ideas and techniques within the community. UWS provides opportunities for exposure of member art through exhibitions. In order to expand its horizons, the Society joined with the Western Federation of Watercolor Societies, an organization with societies in ten western states sharing the similar goals and mission.

Each year the Utah Watercolor Society sponsors two exhibitions juried by nationally recognized watercolorists. From the UWS Spring Open Exhibition, a selection of works is curated for the Utah Division of Arts and Museums’ Traveling Exhibition Program. This Exhibition represents the best of Utah watercolor art.

This year, the Utah Watercolor Society is pleased to welcome American Watercolor Society Signature Member, Janet Rogers, as the guest judge and juror. Janet is known for her portraits of women and children as well as wonderfully expressive floral paintings. In addition, UWS is proud to partner with the Utah Division of Arts and Museums for the 2017 Utah Watercolor Society Traveling Exhibition.

Resources

2017-2018 Traveling Schedule

Schedule posted in June 2017

Two Utah Artists Awarded $10,000 Fellowships


The Utah Division of Arts & Museums proudly announces Jonathan Frioux of Holladay and Jean Richardson of Salt Lake City as the $10,000 Visual Arts Fellowship recipients for 2017.
This year’s juror, Gilbert Vicario, is The Selig Family Chief Curator at the Phoenix Art Museum. He selected both of the fellowship winners, who will receive the funding to further their artistic goals and professional development. Continue reading

Director Named for Utah Division of Arts & Museums

SALT LAKE CITY — Victoria Panella Bourns has been named the director of the The Utah Division of Arts & Museums.

Panella Bourns has directed the Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts, and Parks (ZAP) program for the past 12 years. The program distributes approximately $14 million annually to more than 170 arts and cultural organizations. Prior to joining ZAP, she assisted cultural organizations and other nonprofits with strategic planning, board development, and executive searches through Panella Consulting.

“Victoria has been a leader in the arts community for decades,” said Jill Remington Love, executive director of the Department of Heritage & Arts. The Division of Arts & Museums is one of six divisions within the department. “She’s familiar with the division’s role and will have an immediate, positive influence on its many programs.” Continue reading

Fellowships for Visual Arts Excellence in Utah

Each year, two $10,000 Fellowships are awarded to individual visual artists to acknowledge their artistic excellence and encourage their careers. Artists practicing in a variety of media such as painting, drawing, printmaking, photography, sculpture, craft, and new genres are eligible. Fellowship awards do not require matching funds.

Applying artists must demonstrate professionalism in their practice through quality images and documentation. Artists must be Utah residents not enrolled in a degree- or certificate-granting program.

2017 Fellowship Guidelines

2017 Visual Art Fellows

Jonathan Frioux received his MFA in Painting from Rhode Island School of Design and BFA from Brigham Young University. In the last 4 years he has taught in the Department of Visual Arts at Brigham Young University and Weber State University. Currently his work is inspired by abstract painting, spirituality, and the ocean – forms like billowing sails, longitude and latitude lines and broken nets make up most of his compositions. Along with these lined backdrops additional subjects and narratives are introduced with the goal of creating a condition of simultaneity, anticipation and spatial wonder.

www.jonathanfrioux.com

 

 

 

Jean Richardson is a Scottish Artist and Educator living and making art in Utah. She identifies mostly as a Scot despite being as a dual citizen of the United Kingdom and the United States. Her work is a direct response to her relationship to place and the conflict of feeling both lost and found within a place. Her sculptures and installations made from her collections of commonplace objects explore the dichotomy of displacement and belonging. Jean received her BA(Hons) in Drawing and Painting at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design in Scotland. She then moved to the US to continue her art education at Brigham Young University, where she received her MFA in Studio Art. Jean has also researched, exhibited and taught in a variety of countries, including Israel, Spain, Tonga, and New Zealand. Her many travels have and continue to
influence her art practice. Banner image (Jean Richardson, Brollie Ball, 2014)

jean-richardson.com


2017 Visual Art Fellowship Juror Statement

I am honored to have served as the 2017 Visual Art Fellowship Juror for Utah Arts & Museums, and to become acquainted with the local arts community. Having recently moved from the Midwest to Arizona I am especially interested in exploring what motivates contemporary artists of the West. My personal experience with my new home, having only lived in Phoenix for 15 months, is one of fascination with the landscape. The sense of wide open spaces, endless horizons, beautiful desert plants and gorgeous red rocks stand in stark relief to what is found in the rest of the United States. Utah and Arizona are physically connected by this landscape. Nonetheless, as artists and curators living in these gorgeous places we struggle with trying to compete this natural beauty. As a contemporary curator I constantly struggle with the question, what beyond beauty can art offer and what is our responsibility to our communities and to ourselves? To run counterpoint to pure aesthetics, to question, to advocate, or to simply react, is perhaps the most critical obligation that contemporary art has to the world.

As the sole juror, I was pleased to get a sense of the artistic territory of contemporary artists living in Utah. A strong diversity of materials, gestures and cultures gave me a profound sense of a community wholly committed to the practice of art making. I felt an instant connection with the work of Jean Richardson. Feelings of isolation, or as she states, “the dichotomy of displacement and belonging” resonated very deeply with my current world view. Her video “Every Now And Then I Fall Apart,” seemed to poetically articulate a profound feeling of loneliness that we all feel either metaphorically or in actual fact through a very thoughtful and open ended way. It’s very difficult to effectively articulate through purely visual means these complex emotions and I feel her work did this through the conceptually-tight vocabulary of performance and sculpture. I linked aspects of Richardson’s recent work to the practice of Jonathan Frioux and his interest in abstract painting. Here there was an almost physical and formal correspondence through bodies of water that are used to singular ends. The instability of the ocean is used as a formal challenge to the traditional notion of the grid in Frioux’s paintings. This conceptual framework surprised me yet I fully bought into the originality of his investigation and practice. I must also acknowledge the work of Cara Krebs and Mary Sauer who each brought originality and rigor to their respective practices. In closing I want to thank all of the artists who submitted their work for consideration. Now more than ever we need to be fearless and willing to go over the edge for what we believe, and I appreciate your willingness to participate in the cultural conversation of our time. – Gilbert Vicario,

Gilbert Vicario is The Selig Family Chief Curator at the Phoenix Art Museum since October 2015. Prior to joining the Phoenix Art Museum he was senior curator and division head for curatorial affairs at the Des Moines Art Center since 2009. Vicario has extensive international experience working with artists and organizing exhibitions that present artwork from around the globe; experience working in major encyclopedic museums; a passion for exploring ideas that show links between historical works and contemporary art; and an interest in Latin American and Latino Art. He holds a masters in curatorial studies from Bard College.

Past Recipients 1986 – 2016

Fellowship Video Profiles

In partnership with “Artists of Utah-15 Bytes,” we produce short artist profiles of the recipients as part of the award. Please see the links below to some of the videos we’ve produced of our recent fellowship recipients.

Questions?

Contact Felicia Baca at fbaca@utah.gov or 801.245.7272

 

Utah Artists Search For Their Own “Great Good Place” At Alice Gallery

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah Arts & Museums presents The Great Good Place, an exhibition at the Alice Gallery from March 10th through May 5th.

An artist’s reception will be held April 21st from 6-9 p.m. for Gallery Stroll. The Alice Gallery is located at 617 E. South Temple and is free and open to the public Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The Great Good Place exhibits the work of a group of emerging artists fascinated with the history of the two-dimensional image and its relentless search for an Arcadia or Utopia. The works exhibited will showcase how the individual artists attempt to reach their own form of escape and peace. Artists include Greg Caldwell, Aloe Corry, Pearl Corry, Madeline Rupard, David Raleigh, and Lim Kheng Saik.

“Whether the composed parlor paintings of the 19th century, the wild urgency of expressionism, or the intentional grittiness and mundanity of modern and post-modern painting, we observe that this pull never evades artists, even if the symbols and shapes surrounding it may change,” Rupard said. “This group exhibition will showcase the commonalities and also distinctions in how each artist attempts to reach their own ‘great good place’ through drawing and painting.”

The exhibit’s title echoes the short story by Henry James, which art critic Peter Schjeldahl described in a 2011 article for Frieze Magazine.

“An overburdened man is somehow transported to an unremarkable, even rather dull, but friendly hotel or club; it’s a little monastery-like, at an unknown location. It refreshes him. His life back home improves,” Schjeldahl wrote. “Was it a dream? It’s not clear in the story. It doesn’t matter. I love James’s phrase, the Great Good Place: I think everyone has one. Yours is tailored to your particular sorrows and contradictions, which it soothes and resolves, and mine to mine, which it soothes and resolves. The humour, and the wisdom, in James’s story is that the protagonist’s haven….[is] nothing orgiastic or exalting. No dreams come true there. That’s in the nature of Great Good Places, I believe. They are not projections of our wishes. They are registrations, perhaps quite humble, of what we lack. They aren’t exciting. They are, however, greatly good.”

The Rio & Alice Galleries were created as a service to Utah artists. They provide free venues for emerging and established artists to collaborate on exhibits and engage the community through art making and dialogue. For more information on exhibition and other program opportunities visit visualarts.utah.gov.

Public Art Opportunities in Provo, West Valley City

The Utah Public Art Program of the Division of Arts and Museums has issued two calls for letters of interest and qualifications for projects in Provo and West Valley City.

The deadline for the 4th District Court building in Provo is March 31 and for a new liquor store in West Valley City (pictured) is April 7. Details about both projects can be found at publicart.utah.gov and applications may be submitted at callforentry.org. Continue reading