Skip to content
Secondary Content

Category Archives: DHA

Utah Students Excel at National History Day Contest

Ten Utah middle- and high-school students placed among the top entries in the nation at the annual National History Day Competition at the University of Maryland, College Park. These exceptional young historians placed in the Top Ten in their categories among 3,000 competitors at the national meet held last week.

Utah’s top finishers:

Third Place: Kelsey Hagman, Brighton High School (Sandy): “The Kansas-Nebraska Act: Compromise Turned to Conflict,” Senior Individual Website.

Fourth Place: Caitlin Radovan, Thomas Edison Charter School South (Nibley): “Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg: Fight for Gender Equality and the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act,” Junior Individual Website.

Fourth Place: Andrew Smaellie and Thomas Varghese, The Waterford School (Sandy): “Steve Jobs vs. Apple: The Conflict and Compromise that Changed the Technology World,” Junior Group Website.

Eighth Place: Outstanding Junior State Entry: Zachary Jessop, Midvale Middle School (Salt Lake): “Each Life is Worth a World: Gil and Eleanor Kraus and the Rescue of Fifty Jewish Children from Nazi Germany,” Junior Individual Documentary.

Honorable Mention:

  • Jacob Simmons, Brighton High School (Sandy): “Rabin of Israel: A Story of War and Peace”
  • Kasper Nilsson, Waterford School (Sandy): “Conflict Over Civil Rights: The Compromise of the Birmingham Retailers”
  • Gracyn Killpack, Thomas Edison Charter School South (Logan): “Want Beer? It’s Not Here: The Conflict and Compromise of Prohibition in the United States”
  • Kallie Kunz and Allie Jorgensen, Lakeridge Junior High School (Orem): “Rocking the Civil Rights Movement: The Little Rock Nine”

National Museum of American History National History Day Exhibit Showcase
Faith Moua, Mountain Heights Academy (West Valley City), “The Secret War’s Secret: The U.S. Hmong Alliance”

National Museum of African-American History and Culture NHD Documentary Showcase:

  • Kasper Nilsson, Waterford School (Sandy): “Conflict Over Civil Rights: The Compromise of the Birmingham Retailers”
  • Lily Frame and Esme Smith, Waterford School (Sandy): “Women’s Suffrage in Utah: Conflict Between Federal Government, the LDS Church, and the State Government”

Forty-five Utah students competed at nationals. Their original historical research projects centered on the theme “Conflict and Compromise in History.” During the rigorous week of competition, the students toured the U.S. Capitol and met with Senator Mike Lee.

Utah’s National History Day program encourages students to delve into the past through historical research, critical thinking, and presentation. Students may choose a topic from local, national, or world history, ranging from politics and war to science, social history, and the arts. They then create museum-style exhibits, historical performances, original websites, documentary films, and research papers to showcase their work. Entries are judged in a series of competitions beginning at the local level and culminating in the national contest held each June.

“History Day is an exciting way to engage students and teachers in the study of historical issues, people and events,” said Wendy Rex-Atzet, state coordinator for the Utah History Day program. “This program truly makes history come to life for young people by offering the freedom to choose a meaningful topic, and then giving them the research and analytical tools they need to discover the past on their own.”

Utah History Day is the state’s official National History Day affiliate. Formerly called Utah History Fair, this program has operated continuously in Utah since 1980. The program was originally developed and housed at Utah State University. In 2014 it was transferred to the Utah Division of State History in Salt Lake City.

Spike 150 Grant Opportunities

On May 10th, 1869, the Transcontinental Railroad was completed at Promontory Point in Northern Utah.  In recognition of the sesquicentennial of the 1869 Transcontinental Railroad’s completion in Utah, funding for railroad-related projects is now available through the Department of Heritage & Arts.

Three categories of grants are available:

  1. Spike 150 Cultural Celebration Grants – Funding for Utah arts, cultural, history, and humanities-based organizations, and local communities, to plan celebratory events, exhibits, festivals, performances, or programs around the sesquicentennial commemorating event.
    Guidelines  |  Online Application
  2. Railroad Depot Upgrade Grants – Funding for Utah historic railroad depots that serve as museums or visitor information centers in order to enhance the historic appearance and functionality of the railroad depot to support the Anniversary. Preference will be given to projects that contribute to the long-term maintenance and preservation of the historic railroad depot.
    Guidelines Online Application
  3. Local History Grants – Funding for Utah communities and organizations to include Transcontinental Railroad or general railroad history in their 2019 programming. These can include public education activities, exhibits, research, events, and presentations related to the topic of railroads in Utah.
    Guidelines  |  Online Application

Eligible applicants include nonprofit organizations, schools, local historical societies, arts and cultural organizations, museums, libraries, local governments, and others. Topics and subjects related to this event may include, but are not limited to: transportation, travel, industry, technology, infrastructure, innovation, immigrant & labor issues, impact on Indigenous peoples,  environmental issues, globalization, historical figures & stories, related geographic locales,Transcontinental Railroad routes, westward expansion, social & economic impacts, etc.

Grant funding is provided by the State of Utah. Grants are competitive and panel-reviewed. Grant applications are due August 3rd, 2018. Grantees will have between September 1, 2018-December 31, 2019 to complete their project.

For more information, please contact:
Racquel Cornali, 801-236-7541 or
rcornali@utah.gov
Rachel Cook, 801-715-6722 or rcook@utah.gov
Alena Franco, 801-245-7233 or afranco@utah.gov.


Logos
Spike150 Logo Department of Heritage & Arts Logo

Utah Arts & Museums Recognizes 2018 Legislative Champions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Utah Division of Arts and Museums is pleased to inaugurate the Alice Merrill Horne Legislative Champion Award. This award acknowledges elected officials who initiate legislation to ensure Utah’s arts, culture, and heritage can thrive and grow. Alice Merrill Horne was our first legislative champion. In 1899, she sponsored the bill creating the first state arts agency in the nation.

This year, we’re honoring two individuals who have gone above and beyond to support arts and museums.

During the 2018 legislative session, Rep. Brad Wilson took the initiative to assist school districts across the state in caring for and providing a path to keep works of art purchased by the public in the public domain.

Also during the 2018 legislative session, Rep. Patrice Arent sponsored HB180 – Art Collection Committee Amendments, which fully acknowledged our first legislative champion, Alice Merrill Horne. Thanks to Rep. Arent, our state art collection is now officially known as the State of Utah Alice Merrill Horne Art Collection.

Utah Students Compete in Poetry Out Loud State Finals

Six students from throughout Utah competed Wednesday for an opportunity to qualify for the national Poetry Out Loud finals in Washington, D.C.

Rebecca Akec (pictured) of Judge Memorial High School in Salt Lake City won the competition. She will represent Utah on April 23, 24, and 25 in Washington, D.C. at the national finals of Poetry Out Loud.

Akec recited The World Is Too Much With Us by William Wordsworth, The River of Bees” by W.S. Merwin, and So This Is Nebraska by Ted Kooser.
Second place went to Rain Flower Tanner from the Waterford School.

The Utah Division of Arts & Museums presented the state finals for Poetry Out Loud, a national poetry recitation competition sponsored by The Poetry Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. During the competition, students recited works selected from an anthology of nearly 600 classic and contemporary poems.

High schools around the state participated in Poetry Out Loud activities and competed in six region competitions held in Brigham City, Herriman, Ogden, Provo, St. George, and Salt Lake City. Region winners competing at the state level are:

  • Rebecca Akec, Judge Memorial Catholic High School, Salt Lake City
  • Lindsey Aune, Legacy Preparatory Academy, North Salt Lake
  • Emery Busk, Desert Hills Middle School, St. George
  • Maika Havili, American Fork High School, American Fork
  • Emma Tackett, Bear River High School, Brigham City
  • Rain Flower Tanner, The Waterford School, Sandy

The emcee for the evening was Johann Jacobs, Utah Arts Council chairperson. Utah Poet Laureate Paisley Rekdal read, as well.

Since 2006, five Utah winners have placed in the top 10 of the national finals of Poetry Out Loud. The 2018 finals will be held at George Washington University April 23-25. The semifinals and finals webcast live may be seen at arts.gov.

Poetry Out Loud encourages high school students to learn about great poetry through memorization, performance, and competition. Poetry Out Loud seeks to foster the next generation of literary readers by capitalizing on trends in poetry recitation and performance. The program builds on the resurgence of poetry as an oral art form by inviting the dynamic aspects of slam poetry, the spoken word, and theater into the English classroom. Through Poetry Out Loud, students master public-speaking skills, build self-confidence, and learn about their literary heritage.