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Category Archives: DHA Featured

NHPA 50 Year Anniversary

Join the nationwide celebration for the 50th Anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) in 2016. This Act transformed the face of communities throughout the United States and Utah by establishing a framework and incentives to preserve historic buildings, landscapes, and archaeological sites.  Coordinated through Preservation50.org, the nationwide celebration is designed to inform and engage all ages and backgrounds in this significant law’s effects on local communities and history. Since 1966, the NHPA has shaped preservation efforts on America’s history and culture while generating positive social and economic impacts. In 2015, the Utah State Historic Preservation Office (formed in 1973) gathered stakeholders to organize a year of events and to gather engaging stories and media for the celebration.

This website is a portal to a year of events and activities that cover all corners of Utah.

Events Calendar     Media     Preservation Apps     Links     Partners

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Shipwreck at the Great Salt Lake

 

Utah Drawn: An Exhibition of Rare Maps

We are pleased to announce an exhibition of forty rare historical maps depicting the region that became Utah from its earliest imaginings by European cartographers to the modern state’s boundaries.

Original maps shown are from the private collection of Salt Lake City businessman Stephen Boulay, with additional contributions from the Utah State Historical Society, LDS Church History Department, L. Tom Perry Special Collections at Brigham Young University, Special Collections at the J. Willard Marriott Library, and the American West Center at the University of Utah.

The exhibition is curated by Travis Ross and Stephen Boulay. Exhibition designer is Kerry Shaw. See here for other contributors and exhibition partners.

Additional selected maps from various institutions and private collectors will be offered as a “show and tell” event in the center of the State Capitol Rotunda on January 27, noon to 2 p.m.

The exhibition will run through late summer 2017.

For an online interactive map detailing the shifting political and cultural boundaries of Utah, see Contested Boundaries: Creating Utah’s State Lines.


UHQ Digital Exhibition

The six maps reproduced below are part of Utah Drawn: An Exhibition of Rare Maps displayed in the Utah Capitol Building fourth floor beginning January 27, 2017.

Maps serve many purposes. They represent physical geographies, recording landmarks, routes, and boundaries. But they also reflect varying perceptions, imaginations, values, and aspirations. This is certainly true of the maps presented here. Over five centuries, empires and explorers along with printers and publishers worked first to trace the outline of a continent that was new to Europeans and then, eventually, to fill in its vast middle. These maps show the steady increase of geographic knowledge of the Americas, but they also demonstrate the economic and political interests that produced that knowledge and the individuals who benefited from it. They hint at what map makers and their sponsors determined was worth documenting, identifying, and, in some cases, possessing. They often erase, obscure, and distort. Put simply: maps are more than cartographic representations of known or imagined physical features on the landscape. As you examine these maps, try to determine the purposes for which they were made and any mistruths, omissions, and distortions they may contain.


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Title: America Septentrionalis

Creator: Jan Jansson (1588-1664)

Published in: Nouveau Theatre du Monde ou Nouvel Atlas

Place: Amsterdam

Date: 1641

This striking hand-colored map by the Dutch cartographer Jan Jansson (1588-1664) was the first atlas map to treat North America on its own page, separate from the rest of the western hemisphere. Jansson produced this definitive synthesis of the best cartographic knowledge then available. In the process, he helped to canonize both true and false details about North America’s geography for generations. This was not the first map to depict California as an island, for instance, but its widespread distribution helped to popularize that misconception. The eastern seaboard illustrates the French presence along the St. Lawrence River, the English in New England and Virginia, and the Dutch in what is labeled “Novum Belgium.” Though the lake feeding the Rio Del Norte might look familiar to modern Utahns, the Great Salt Lake did not enter the written record until the Timpanogos Utes related its existence to the Dominguez-Escalanté Expedition of 1776.


 

miera-plano-geografico-de-los-descumbimientos

Title: “Plano Geografico de los Descumbimientos”

Creator: Bernardo de Miera y Pacheco (1713-1785)

Manuscript (Original at Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University)

Date: 1778 (Facsimile, 1970)

Bernardo de Miera y Pacheco (1713-1785) traveled with the Dominguez-Escalante Expedition of 1776-1777 and drew this map as a record of the journey. The party served the Spanish interest in establishing an overland route connecting Mexico to Alta California, which remained an overseas colony of New Spain in spite of its relative geographic proximity well into the next century. In this map, Miera depicted the Rio Colorado with new clarity. This map depicted “Laguna de los Timpanogos” (Utah Lake) for the first time. It also illustrates the “Great River of the West,” a mythical river that tantalized those hoping to find a water passage to Asia for nearly two hundred years. Contrary to later maps, this conflation of Utah’s modern Green River and Sevier River terminated in a lake within the Great Basin. Miera named it Laguna de Miera after himself, but modern Utahns will know it as Sevier Lake.


 

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Title: “Partie du Mexique”

Creator: Philippe Vandermaelen (1795-1869)

Published in: Atlas Universel de Géographie Physique, Politique, Statistique Et Minéralogique

Date: 1827

Drawn by the Belgian cartographer Philippe Marie Vandermaelen (1795-1869), this map depicted the region from Lake Timpanogos (Utah Lake) to present day Colorado and Wyoming. It appeared in Vandermaelen’s six-volume Atlas Universel, published in 1827. As the first atlas to depict the entire globe with a large, consistent scale (26 miles to the inch), the individual maps in this atlas could be combined on a globe approximately 7.75 meters in diameter. The Princeton University Library’s has rendered the resulting globe digitally. The fourth volume focused on North America, he illustrated the Trans-Mississippi West in about twenty sheets.


 

UTA_Garrett_00333, Mon Oct 08, 2007, 1:57:07 PM, 8C, 8424x7804, (1998+2895), 150%, bent 6 stops, 1/25 s, R70.7, G66.9, B86.1

UTA_Garrett_00333, Mon Oct 08, 2007, 1:57:07 PM, 8C, 8424x7804, (1998+2895), 150%, bent 6 stops, 1/25 s, R70.7, G66.9, B86.1

Title: “Neueste Karte von Mexico … 1850”

Creator: Carl Christian Franz Radefeld (1788-1874)

Published in: Joseph Meyer (1796-1856), Grosser Hand-Atlas

Place: Hildburghausen

Date: 1850

Even if the U.S. government never recognized the expansive state of Deseret, the prolific mapmakers at Meyer’s publishing company Bibliographisches Institut in Hildburghausen, Germany did, if only briefly. Like Young’s map of Deseret in Mitchell’s Universal Atlas, Meyer’s Grosser Hand-Atlas published a rare map of Deseret as originally proposed. That was not a coincidence. Meyer and his cartographer Radefeld relied on Mitchell’s atlas to produce their 1850-1854 editions of the Hand-Atlas.


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Title: “Map of the United States of America”

Creator: James H. Young (1792-18??)

Published in: Samuel Augustus Mitchell (1792-1868), A New Universal Atlas

Place: Philadelphia

Date: 1850

Fueled by emerging mass-market interest, atlases experienced a resurgence in popularity in the 1840s and 1850s. Produced for S. Augustus Mitchell’s contribution to that market by his longtime engraver and associate James H. Young, this map captured the territorial expansion of the newly-continental United States in progress. While the eastern United States might look relatively familiar—save the lack of West Virginia as a distinct state—the western territories bear only a vague similarity to the familiar state boundaries that would eventually settle. This map captured an already-reduced Utah Territory that stretched from roughly the Sierra Nevada range to the continental divide.

Note that the map erroneously called that territory by its then-defunct name of Deseret. This particular mid-1850 edition of the atlas had two U.S. maps, with each identifying the new territory by its alternate names. The United States never recognized an entity called “Deseret.” Western political events moved rather quickly at times, so it is understandable that a map prepared in early 1850 and published at the end of the year would not be able to keep up. Nonetheless, the territory which should have been labeled Utah Territory never looked like this. [link to the GIS site]


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Title: “California, Oregon, Washington, Utah, New Mexico”

Creator: Samuel Augustus Mitchell (1792-1868)

Published in: A New Universal Atlas

Publisher: Charles Desilver

Place: Philadelphia

Date: 1857

Selling atlases in the mass market was a race as often as it was a contest over accuracy and comprehensiveness. Produced rapidly for Mitchell’s Atlas Universal in 1850 by adding new boundaries to an existing base map from the previous decade, this was one of the first maps to show the new state of California. It had little else going for it. Its intellectual debt to the 1840s meant that Frémont practically authored the Great Basin. The map even identified it as the Fremont Basin to at least the 1855 edition. Over the 1850s, Mitchell updated the map, adding in subsequent editions the cities and counties that had been conspicuously absent in the rushed earlier versions.

 


 

 

 

A Different Perspective on Landscape Painting at Rio Gallery

adam_leviUtah Arts & Museums presents En Plein Air: Levi Jackson & Adam Bateman, an exhibition on display at the Rio Gallery from Jan 20th – March 10th, 2017. An artist’s reception will be held on January 20th from 6-9 p.m. for Gallery Stroll.

Adam Bateman and Levi Jackson, in collaboration, have made 60 paintings en plein air as a performative act, returning them to their forgotten foundation in the western landscape. Having both grown up and lived in rural areas of the West, both Jackson and Bateman kicked against the tradition of landscape painting as the defining characteristic of western art’s historical significance and culture. For this exhibition they have traveled headfirst into seeing the landscape through painting’s eyes.

The Rio Gallery is located inside the Rio Grande Depot at 300 S. Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City. Gallery hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Additionally, the Rio Gallery is open during the Winter Market at the Rio Grande Depot. The Winter Market hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Jan. 28, Feb. 11, and Feb. 25. Vendors sell local artisan goods, foods, and crafts, and the market also includes food trucks.

Governor’s Leadership in the Arts Awards

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Leadership in the Arts Awardee Delora Bertelsen accepts her award from Utah First Lady Jeanette Herbert in 2010.

The Governor’s Awards in the Arts were established in 1980 to recognize individuals and organizations that make outstanding contributions to the cultural life of Utah.

In 2007, the awards adapted to honor those who have demonstrated exemplary leadership in the arts. Today, the Governor’s Leadership in the Arts Awards recognize those qualities that advance the arts for the people and communities in our state and are Utah’s highest honor in the arts.

Recipients of the 2017 Governor’s Leadership in the Arts Awards will be announced soon.


Sponsorship – Governor’s Leadership in the Arts Awards

Sponsor a table at the Governor’s Leadership in the Arts Awards luncheon to help us provide scholarships and to keep the conference affordable for Utah’s arts community.

2017 Table Sponsorship Form

You can purchase a table here

  • Arts Benefactor Table $1000 – Premiere seating for a table of 10 – Acknowledgement at luncheon and logo in program – Logo and link on conference web page – Display table at the conference – 4 full conference registrations.
  • Arts Patron Table $650 – Prominent seating for a table of 8 – Acknowledgement at luncheon and name in program – Name listing on conference web page – 2 full conference registrations.
  • Arts Supporter Table $350 – Prime seating for 4 – Acknowledgement at luncheon and name in program – Name listing on conference web page.

 


We gratefully acknowledge the table sponsors for the
2016 Governor’s Leadership in the Arts Awards

Arts Benefactor

Arts Patron

Utah Chamber Artists

Arts Supporter

Past Award Recipients

Governor’s Leadership in the Arts Awards

2016 Utah Arts Festival
Organization Leadership in the Arts Award
James Rees
Education Leadership in the Arts Award
Zion Canyon Arts & Humanities Council
Local Arts Agency Leadership in the Arts Award
Dr. Craig Jessop
Individual Leadership in the Arts Award
2015 Plan-B Theatre Company
Organization Leadership in the Arts Award
Carrie Trenholm
Education Leadership in the Arts Award
Epicenter
Local Arts Agency Leadership in the Arts Award
Kathy Cieslewicz
Individual Leadership in the Arts Award
2014 City of St. George, Mayor Jon Pike
Community Leadership in the Arts Award
Spy Hop Productions
Education Leadership in the Arts Award
Timpanogos Storytelling Institute
Organization Leadership in the Arts Award
Shirley Ririe
Individual Leadership in the Arts Award
2013 Gunnison City, Mayor Lori Nay
Community Leadership in the Arts Award
Kim Schaefer
Education Leadership in the Arts Award
Patricia A. Richards
Volunteer Leadership in the Arts Award
Wally Bloss
Individual Leadership in the Arts Award
2012 City of Ogden,
Mayor Mike Caldwell 

Community Leadership in the Arts Award
Chris Roberts
Education Leadership in the Arts Award
Artspace
Organization Leadership in the Arts Award
Teri Orr
Individual Leadership in the Arts Award
2011 City of Kanab,
Mayor Nina Laycook 

Community Leadership in the Arts Award
K. Newell Dayley
Education Leadership in the Arts Award
Utah Shakespeare Festival
Organization Leadership in the Arts Award
A. Scott Anderson
Individual Leadership in the Arts Award
2010 Sandy City,
Mayor Tom Dolan

Community Leadership in the Arts Award
Rachel Wheeler
Education Leadership in the Arts Award
India Cultural
Center of Utah

Organization Leadership in the Arts Award
Delora Bertelsen
Individual Leadership in the Arts Award
2009 Layton City,
Mayor Steve Curtis

Community Leadership in the Arts Award
Alice Perreault, Kindred Spirits 
Support of Children Through the Arts Award
Neighborworks Salt Lake, Maria Garciaz
Organization Leadership in the Arts Award
Anne Cullimore Decker
Individual Merit Leadership in the Arts Award 
2008 Gail Bunker
Community Leadership Award
Ferron Holt
Arts Education Leadership Award
Representative Greg Hughes
Legislative Leadership Award
Ruth Draper
Lifetime Leadership Award
2007 Representative Sheryl Allen
Public Leadership in the Arts Award
Beverley Taylor Sorenson
Support of Children Through Arts Education Award
Mayor Dave Sakrison
Local Elected Official Award
Kaziah Hancock
Humanitarian Award for Compassion Through the Arts

Governor’s Awards in the Arts Recipients, 1980 to 2003

National Service Day on the Hill 2017

On February 9, 2017, national service programs from across the state will gather at the Utah State Capitol to educate legislators on the role of national service and the impact they are having in their communities. This event provides national service programs an opportunity to help policy makers better understand what national service is and how the various programs work to address challenges within their community and improve the quality of life in Utah. Continue reading

Arts Day on the Hill

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Save the date for the 2017 Arts Day on the Hill, February 14th.

Patrons and leaders of the arts and humanities will meet and talk with their state senators and representatives in the Capitol Rotunda. Be among the arts-interested individuals and organizations that will gather to celebrate the arts and meet with their state representatives. Contact David Wicai at 801-236-7547 for more information.

Continue reading

2017 American Indian Caucus Day at the Capitol

Every year the Utah Division of Indian Affairs (UDIA) invites state and tribal leaders, legislators, community members and partners to attend our annual America Indian Caucus Day at the Capitol.  Caucus Day provides an opportunity for state government to maintain and strengthen its relationship with Utah’s eight sovereign tribal nations by encouraging discussions between state and tribal leaders.

Please join us at our annual American Indian Caucus Day at the Capitol on Monday, February 6, 2017, 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. in the auditorium of the Utah State Office Building. We will provide more information as details are finalized.

Event Location

The 2017 American Indian Caucus Day is being held in the Utah State Office Building, which is the building behind (north) the State Capitol. Enter through the main entrance located on the south side of the building.  Take the elevator to the basement.  Please remember to check-in at the registration table.

Click here for map of Capitol grounds.

Agenda – State Office Building, Auditorium

8:30 – 9:00 AM –  Attendee Check-in
9:00 – 9:30 AM –  General Session
– Welcome
– Spiritual Prayer
– Cultural Performance
– Signing Ceremony – Utah Dept. of Health (Tribal Consultation & UIO Conferment                                                        Policy)
9:30 – 10:30 AM – Inter-generational Poverty Initiative – Utah Dept. of Workforce Services
10:30-11:00 AM – Gov. Gary Hebert and Lt. Gov. Spencer Cox
11:00 – 11:30 AM – Utah Dept. of Public Safety Presentation
11:30 – 12:15 PM – Infinite Mind Presentation
12:15 – 1:30 PM – Lunch/Networking Time
1:30 – 2:00 PM –  Legislative Update
2:00 – 2:15 PM –  Utah League of Native American Voters
2:15 – 3:15 PM –
3:15 – 4:00 PM –  Utah Division of State History – “Utah Drawn” map exhibit, State Capitol
Networking Time

Parking

Parking is very limited during the Legislative Session and taking public transit or carpooling is encouraged.  Street parking is available. Please pay attention to parking enforcement signs. Click here for directions and parking information.

 

Utah #1 in volunteering for 11th year

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Utah continues to lead the country in volunteer rates, according to data released Nov. 15 by the Corporation for National and Community Service. The release of the Volunteering and Civic Life in America report marks the 11th year Utah has led the nation in total volunteerism.

According to the report, Utah is the only state to achieve a total volunteerism rate above 40 percent. Utah had 43 percent of their residents volunteer, while the second-highest state, Minnesota, had 35 percent of their residents volunteer.

Volunteer activities, which can include everything from distributing food to mentoring to coaching youth sports, will prove even more important as a way to strengthen communities. In a country often divided on political lines, volunteering can provide a bridge between differences.

“Utahns have a strong history of volunteering and building their communities through service, which this ranking reflects,” Gov. Gary R. Herbert said. “Our greater sense of cooperation and charity makes for a more civil, generous society.”

The Volunteering and Civic Life in America report is part of a comprehensive study of volunteering and civic engagement in the United States. Annual data on volunteering and civic activities was collected from Americans age 16 and older through the Current Population Survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau.

According to the data, 844,023 Utah residents volunteered a total of 170 million hours of service. Those volunteer hours translated to an economic benefit of $3.8 billion. Additionally, 65 percent of Utah residents donated $25 or more to charity.

Three cities in Utah also ranked high in the report. Ogden claimed the top spot for mid-size cities from Provo, which fell to second. Salt Lake City has the second-highest percentage of residents volunteering among large cities.

Looking for opportunities to volunteer in your community? Visit our resources page.

 

Circleville Massacre Memorial

Circleville MonumentIn April 1851, Mormon settlers in Circleville, a small hamlet in central Utah Territory, slit the throats of as many as 30 men, women, and children belonging to the Paiute Koosharem band. The massacre happened during the Black Hawk War because of unfounded fears by the settlers that the band posed a threat.

Despite being the worst atrocity committed against Native Americans in Utah, the massacre is not well known. Circleville residents—none original descendants of the perpetrators—do not much discuss it. The massacre is hardly mentioned in general histories of the state, and even the Paiute people know little of what happened to their ancestors.

That will begin to change, however, when the victims will be memorialized with a new memorial in Circleville. The memorial will provide a solemn place of contemplation and commemoration to honor the victims of one of Utah history’s saddest episodes. Continue reading

Veterans Utah History Project

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Where were you when WWII ended?

The Division of State History and the Utah Department of Veterans & Military Affairs have joined together on the Veterans Utah History Project.

Whether you are a WWII veteran and want to document and share your experiences and memories or you want to volunteer to interview a WWII veteran there are opportunities to participate.

Visit the Utah Department of Veterans & Military Affairs website to learn more and get involved to collect, document and archive this important part of our history.