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Utah Historical Quarterly Current Issue

Volume 83, Number 3 (Summer Issue):

Published since 1928, the Utah Historical Quarterly is the state’s premier history journal and the source for reliable, engaging Utah history. Join the Historical Society for your own copy.

Each issue of the Utah Historical Quarterly is accompanied with rich web supplements that introduce readers to sources, photos, interviews, and other engaging material. These “extras” are located at

WEB EXTRAS: See here 



The Russian Molokans of Park Valley
By Marshall E. Bowen

The Uncompahgre Reservation and the Hill Creek Extension
By Kathryn L. MacKay

Women Inventors in Utah Territory
By Christine Cooper-Rompato

The Carol Carlisle Summer Wedding Dress Collection
A Photo Essay

Found: Rare First Edition of the Earliest Ute and Shoshone Vocabulary
By Richard E. Turley Jr. and Brent M. Rogers

In 1976, the Utah State Historical Society published The Peoples of Utah, a groundbreaking work edited by Helen Z. Papanikolas. In it, Papanikolas and others conveyed the breadth of Utah’s past by recounting the history of some of the state’s ethnic groups—the “pioneers of many cultural strains.” This year, the historical society is revisiting the question of diversity in Utah with an annual conference focused on the theme of “Deep Roots, Many Voices: Exploring Utah’s Multicultural Past.” The summer 2015 issue of Utah Historical Quarterly is part of that exploration.

The arid, expansive landscape of western Box Elder County was once home to an unlikely group of settlers: members of the Russian nonconformist sect known as the Molokans. Persecuted in their own land, the Molokans scouted for places to live in North America, eventually coming in the thousands to California, Arizona, Mexico, Washington State, and—for a time—Park Valley, Utah. In the mid-1910s, at least twenty-seven Molokan families settled and stayed there for a year or more. The opening article in this issue brings the insights of geography to the account of the Park Valley Molokans and traces the experiences of five families before and after their sojourn in Utah. Though the Molokans might have seemed homogenous to outsiders, Marshall E. Bowen writes that “they did not all worship in the same way,” and they followed “diverse paths” throughout their lives.

In another corner of the state, Ute bands in Utah occupied the Uintah Reservation, created in 1861, while Utes in Colorado were removed to the adjacent Uncompahgre Reservation near the Green and White rivers. Reservation lands represented a fraction of the Northern Utes’ aboriginal territory. Still, no sooner had Congress created the Uncompahgre Reservation for Colorado Utes in 1882 that it also begin to consider dividing reservation lands into private land holdings—allotments—for individual Indians. In 1897, Congress opened unalloted lands of the Uncompahgre Reservation to white entry. Our second article details the twentieth-century struggle of the Ute people to win back lands within the boundaries of the 1882 Uncompahgre Reservation. Although the Hill Creek Extension—passed by the Congress in 1948—did not return to the Utes the full acreage, the addition represented a hard-won victory for Utes and employees of the Bureau of Indian Affairs working to undo the damage that opening the reservation had on the tribe and its traditions.

Much of the scholarship about nineteenth-century American women considers their place in the so-called public and private spheres, or, put differently, how society limited the activities of women. The third article adds to the discussion by approaching the past with a specific question: how many women in Utah Territory were granted patents in their own names. It finds that five Utah women successfully patented an invention during this era. The inventions were as individual as their creators, and they serve as evidence that at least some Utah women participated in the world of nineteenth-century business and that a host of people laid the foundations of modern Utah.

The cover of this issue features the wedding dresses of a great-aunt, a mother, and her daughter, material representations of the lives of three women from three disparate moments in the twentieth century. The issue’s fourth piece tells the stories behind these and other dresses that belong to the Carol Carlisle Summer Collection—a group of objects and documents that provides a glimpse into more than one hundred years of history of an extended family.

From material evidence about the lives of women we move to a recently rediscovered artifact of Native-white interactions in territorial Utah. Dimick B. Huntington was a nineteenth-century Mormon missionary with a skill for regional Native languages; in 1853, Huntington prepared and published a Ute and Shoshone vocabulary. For some time, this 1853 edition of the vocabulary was believed to be no longer extant. The final piece in the issue tells the story of how it resurfaced.


Paul T. Nelson, Wrecks of Human Ambition: A History of Utah’s Canyon Country to 1936. Reviewed by Robert S. McPherson

Michael L. Tate, ed. The Great Medicine Road: Narratives of the Oregon, California, and the Mormon Trails. Reviewed by F. Ross Peterson

Julie Debra Neuffer, Helen Andelin and the Fascinating Womanhood Movement. Reviewed by Charlotte Hansen Terry

Susan E. Gray and Gayle Gullett, eds. Continent Maps: Rethinking Western Women’s History and the North American West. Reviewed by Stephanie Fuglaar Statz

Michael W. Homer, Joseph’s Temples: The Dynamic Relationship between Freemasonry and Mormonism. Reviewed by Brady G. Winslow


Gerald R. Clark, Supplying Custer: The Powder River Supply Depot, 1876

Dick Johnston, Won’t Quit: An Escalante Love Story

Norma R. Dalton and Alene Dalton, Images of America: Nine Mile Canyon

Julius C. Birge and Barbara B. Birge, The Awakening of the Desert: An Adventure-Filled Memoir of the Old West

Linda Dunning, Away from the Fold: An Encyclopedia of Utah Performers, vols. 1 and 2



2016 Annual State History Conference



The Utah Division of State History invites the public, scholars, students, policymakers, Indian tribes, and organizations to submit proposals for papers, sessions, panels, roundtables, or multimedia presentations exploring the theme Rural Utah and Western Issues. Sessions for the 64th annual Utah State History conference will be held in September/October 2016.Although the American West is highly urbanized—principally a product of its arid geography—some of its defining characteristics are its open spaces and sparse populations. Outside of its urban corridors, the West is a region of small towns and scattered homes amid a big western landscape. Its history is a mosaic of agriculture, ranching, manufacturing, community life, and culture. Unfortunately, it is also a history sometimes ignored or dismissed by urbanites.One of the biggest and most recognizable of western landscapes is Utah’s—the expansive range of the Great Basin, the peaks of the Central Rockies, and the canyons of the Colorado Plateau. Approximately 97 percent of Utah’s land area is considered rural. But this is not an unpeopled and unstoried landscape. About one in ten Utahns lives in towns of 2,500 people or less.Rural Utahns have grappled with social issues ranging from health care delivery, dynamics of in-migration, rural gentrification, and the retention of rural culture and identity. Land and resource issues—federal/public lands, scarcity of water, energy development among them—are also common, as they are in other western states’ histories. This conference seeks to examine the historical dimensions of these issues, highlighting new, revised, or heretofore unknown histories of rural and western life for a twenty-first century public.The 2016 Program Committee invites proposals that explore the issues and histories confronting rural Utah and the broader West. The conference seeks to include every major region of rural Utah. We welcome a range of formats, from the traditional panels and sessions to more innovative formats. We strongly encourage full session or panel submissions, though we will make every effort to match single paper proposals with other panels and papers.

Proposals can be received after January 31, 2016 at

The deadline to submit is March 31, 2016

For questions, contact Jedediah Rogers (

or Holly George (

Historic Salt Lake City Apartments of the Early Twentieth Century

Text and Photographs by Lisa-Michele Church

Salt Lake City contains many beautiful examples of early twentieth-century apartment buildings constructed to house a growing urban population. With whimsical names such as Piccadilly, Peter Pan or Waldorf, these buildings beckoned to Utahns interested in a new approach to residential life. Apartments became places of beginnings and endings for the young couple starting out, a single woman with her first job, an immigrant family new to the area, or a widow no longer able to care for her home. Apartments were a stage on which the rest of your life came into view. As one resident put it, “You moved in with a suitcase, and out with a truck.”

The buildings were designed with style and architectural flair. Residents could enjoy amenities such as electric stoves, night watchmen, elegant entryways, and, for some, Murphy “disappearing” beds. Local families, including the Coveys, Downings, and Sampsons, constructed many of the complexes. Monthly rents ranged from $30 to $50. The last of the distinctive buildings was built in the 1930s; after World War II, people preferred cozy bungalows in the suburbs.  But about half of the original 180 apartment houses are still standing as a vivid illustration of the boldness with which Salt Lake City entered the twentieth century.

The following photo gallery features a few of these buildings. Download a self-guided walking tour brochure to see the historic apartments buildings at your own pace.

1 Pauline

Pauline. The Pauline was built at 278 East 100 South in 1904. This is a “walk up” design where each apartment has its own entrance landing and balcony. Note the cut sandstone foundation, iron railing balconies, and brick details.

2 Woodruff

The Woodruff, located at 235 South 200 East, was built in 1908 and contained 51 units. The building advertised to “young men looking for desirable apartments close to their work.” There was a café, The building featured steam heat, hot water, telephone, gas range, a dresser, buffet, and Murphy bed. Tenants had the option of choosing the color of their walls. A night watchman and janitor were assigned to the apartment, and a café was an added amenity to residents.

3 Woodruff detail

Note the lovely lamp posts, now gone, and the bold entrance. Abraham Gross and his wife, Vera, were typical residents in the 1930s, living in unit 60 and raising their young son, Jerome. Abe and Vera were Polish immigrants; he worked as a cattle buyer. When Abe was killed tragically in a 1935 train accident, Vera and Jerome moved out and the apartment stood vacant for two years.

4 Altadena

The Altadena, at 310 South 300 East, was built in 1905 at a cost of $21,000 by the Octavius Sampson family. The Sampsons originally named it Vivian Flats but changed the name a few years later to match that of their baby daughter. Typical residents included sisters, Annette and Martha Rustad, Norwegian immigrants who worked as seamstresses in Salt Lake department stores. They lived at the Altadena for many years; neither ever married.

5 Altadena detail

The entrance doors at the Altadena are especially detailed. Both buildings feature pediments, Tuscan columns, dentillated cornices and accented cornerstones.

6 Sampson

The Sampson building is at 276 East 300 South, around the corner from the Altadena. It contained seven “walk up” units. The Altadena and Sampson Apartments are almost identical plans. Both buildings have red brick, white trim, substantial balconies, and oak doors. One luxury item was an elevator at the back of the building.

7 Elise

The Elise, at 561 East 100 South, features a massive columned entrance with decorative iron railings and balconies.

8 Elise detail

The detail on the Elise columns is striking. The building was built in 1914 and contains eight “walk up” units.

9 Hillcrest

The Hillcrest is located at 155 East First Avenue and was built in 1915. It joined other apartment buildings financed by the Covey family, including the Covey Flats (now LaFrance), Buckingham, Kensington, New Hillcrest, and Covey. All were built by W.C.A. Vissing, a popular apartment contractor of the time and member of the Covey family.

10 Buckingham

The u-shaped court of the Buckingham (241 East South Temple) is echoed in the other Covey-designed buildings. All were carefully landscaped with generous courtyards and flower beds.

11 Ruby

The Ruby, at 435 East 200 South, was built in 1912. It contains 21 “walk up” units and beautiful wood framed doors and windows. The detailed brick work is also remarkable.

12 Ruby too

One resident of the Ruby, Sadie Baldwin, worked as a dressmaker earning $720 per year in 1940. Sadie was a young widow with three children to raise.

13 Embassy

The Embassy was built at 130 South 300 East in 1926. It contains 31 units using a double-loaded corridor plan where each room opens off a central corridor, and few have balconies. This plan type was a particularly efficient use of Salt Lake City’s deep lots, and was common in the buildings built after World War I. It is currently called the Pauline Downs.

14 Embassy detail

Most early apartment buildings used bold signs to attract attention and convey style. The Embassy sign is no exception. The Embassy was built, along with two adjacent apartment buildings, by Bessie P. Downing and her husband, Hardy. Hardy was a famous tandem bike racer and boxing promoter. Bessie lived in this building and managed it until Hardy’s passing.

15 Embassy Arms

The Embassy Arms was a little fancier than the Embassy, with its French door balconies and elaborate stone entrance. It was built by the Downings next to the Embassy, at 120 South 300 East, in 1930. Note the stone “D” over the sign; it was originally named the Downing Deluxe.

16 Embassy Arms too

These French door balconies were unusual in a double loaded corridor plan. Note the brickwork and stone accents.

17 Spencer Stewart

The Spencer Stewart, at 740 East 300 South, was built in 1926 and included 29 units. It was advertised in the 1935 Salt Lake Telegram for its “three rooms, electric refrigerators and ranges, furnished or unfurnished, disappearing beds, nice large rooms, moderate rent.”

18 Stratton

The Stratton was built in 1927 as part of a building boom where at least ten new apartment buildings appeared on the downtown skyline. It is located at 49 South 400 East and features some castellation along the roofline, two balconies, and an imposing entrance.

19 Peter Pan

The Peter Pan is located at 445 East 300 South. It is notable for its tile roofs, brick detailing and lovely sign. The building was built in 1927.

20 Peter Pan detail

The name signs on the early apartment buildings were often neon and included colorful metal designs.

21 Bell Wines

The Bell Wines apartments were built in 1927 by a married couple, Hazel Bell and Stanley Wines, who combined their surnames. It is located at 530 East 100 South. The building is evocative of a southern plantation home, with a center porch and tall columns around a courtyard.

22 Bell Wines too

The building contains 30 units opening off a long hallway. One early resident, Eva Harmer, became engaged to her sweetheart, Blaine Allan, while living here in 1934. She was alarmed when she discovered she had dropped her engagement ring down the apartment’s sink. Fortunately, city water officials blocked off the pipes until the ring could be found.

23 Annie Laurie

The Annie Laurie, located at 326 East 100 South, and its sister building, the Lorna Doone, were both built in 1928 by the Bowers Investment Company at a cost of $80,000 each. The Lorna Doone has 33 units and the Annie Laurie has 30.

25 Lorna Doone

The Lorna Doone, at 320 East 100 South, shared an interior block parking lot with the other nearby apartments. Between the two sister buildings is a landscaped courtyard.

24 Lorna Doone detail

Both buildings feature elaborate gargoyles and ornaments at the entrance and on the roofline.

26 Armista

The Armista, located at 55 East 100 South, is a substantial building of stone and brick with little ornamentation. Its doorway features beautiful lamps. Herrick and Company built it with 30 units in 1927. Its name was later changed to the Waldorf Apartments. A 1927 Salt Lake Tribune ad read: “$40.00 to $42.00. One of the most modernly equipped and conveniently located apartments in the city.”

27 Piccardy

The Piccardy, at 115 South 300 East, was built in 1930. It has 40 units: five one-bedroom and five studios on each floor. It features Jacobethan styling, twisting columns at the entrance and some leaded glass windows.

28 Piccardy detail

Acanthus leaf trim and original light fixtures adorn the Piccardy entrance.

29 Los Gables

The Los Gables is one of the largest apartments of the early period with 80 units. It was built at 135 South 300 East in 1929. Note the imposing stone work and arched doorways.

30 Los Gables detail

The Los Gables also features inset stone pieces and timber accents.

31 Piccadilly

The Piccadilly is a typical double-loaded corridor plan, built in 1929 at 24 South 500 East.

32 Piccadilly detail

The doorway at the Piccadilly features the original light fixture and decorative sign.

33 Bigelow

The Bigelow apartments were built in 1930 at 223 South 400 East, containing 30 units. A 1940 ad read: “2 r[oo]m modern, lots of space, light, all electric, good service, exclusive.”

34 Premier

The Premier was built at 27 South 800 East in 1931 for $50,000. The site features an unusually large front courtyard with lush landscaping. Note the upright metal sign on the roof.

35 Premier detail

The Premier entrances have striking stone work and wrought iron gates.

36 Chateau Normandie

The Chateau Normandie, 63 South 400 East, was built in 1931. It is a rare example of a “walk up” design built at the end of this apartment era. It has stately trees and extensive timber accents.

37 Chateau Normandie detail

The windows at the Chateau Normandie are extensively decorated.

38 Eastcliff Westcliff

The East Cliff and West Cliff buildings sit together on 200 South between 400 East and 500 East. They were built in 1927–28 and originally named the Cummings apartments.

39 Mayflower

The Mayflower, at 1283 East South Temple, is one of the largest and most elegant apartment buildings of the first half of the twentieth century. Built in 1929 from a design by the architect Slack Winburn, each floor has only five 2,600-square-foot units. Arches and ivy adorn the exterior.

40 Knickerbocker

The Knickerbocker apartment building at 1280 East South Temple was built in 1911 by W.C.A. Vissing. It has a large carved cornice and massive columns with iron railing balconies.

41 Castle Heights

The Castle Heights apartment building opened in January, 1931 to great acclaim. A Salt Lake Tribune ad dated January 18, 1931, read: “Every kitchen in this ultra modern apartment house is equipped with a genuine Frigidaire unit.” It still stands at 141 East First Avenue. Note the stone work, arched entrance, and neon sign.



2015 Annual Utah State History Conference

Deep Roots, Many Voices: Exploring Utah’s Multicultural Past

Utah is – and always has been – an eclectic mix of peoples and communities. Join us on October 2nd at the Utah Cultural Celebration Center for a free conference full of workshops, history sessions, panels and documentaries on the theme of multicultural diversity. Lunch is included on October 2nd.  Workshops and tours will also be held in conjunction with the conference (please see below for details and dates).

Utah’s history is enriched by the study of a host of peoples, experiences, and voices. The histories of ethnicity, gender, work, and family, from the perspective of ordinary people, do more than pepper diversity in Utah history: they fundamentally change and enhance our understanding of the state and its past. These histories are ones of empowerment, creativity, and survival, as well as conquest, dispossession, and prejudice.

Sorry, conference registration is now closed.  Walk-ins will be accepted as space allows.  We will be recording many of the sessions, which will be available on our website in mid October.

Tour registrations are still being accepted (see links below)

Conference Overview Schedule

October 1, 2015
Workshops (click here for schedule)
Rio Grande Depot
300 S. Rio Grande Street
Salt Lake City, UT
October 2, 2015
History Sessions (click here for schedule)
Lunch and Keynote
Utah Cultural Celebration Center
1355 West 3100 South
West Valley City, UT
October 3, 2105
Tour of Iosepa (click here for schedule)
Separate paid registration is required!
Registration is now available!
October 10, 2015
Tour of Topaz (click here for schedule)
Separate paid registration is required!
Registration is now available!


For questions, please contact Alycia Aldrich at or 801-245-7226

Thank you to our conference sponsors:  W.W. Clyde and Co., American West Center, Ames Construction, Chevron, Charles Redd Center for Western Studies, Fort Douglas Military Museum, J. Willard Marriott Library, Utah Westerners, Utah Humanities, University of Utah Department of History, National Park Service, and Utah Department of Heritage & Arts.

October 2, 2105 12:00 Lunch and Awards Program
Keynote Speaker Pamela S. Perlich, “Utah’s Hidden Diversity: Decoding Evidence from the Census”

September 2015 Brown Bags
Please join us at Utah State Archives for five fascinating discussions in September as we prepare for our annual conference (“Deep Roots, Many Voices: Exploring Utah’s Multicultural Past”) on October 2nd. The first four brown bags begin at 12 noon. (ONLY the Sept. 30th will begin at 1 p.m.)  Bring your friends and your lunch!


October 2, 2015

Registration 7:45 – 8:45 am

8:45 am – 5:00 p.m. History Sessions

12:00 Lunch Program – History Awards and Keynote


Conference at a Glance

Paper abstracts and presenter biographies can be accessed by clicking on the session below.

8:45 – 10:15 a.m. 10:30 – 11:45 a.m. 1:45 – 3:15 p.m. 3:30 – 5:00 p.m.
The Breadth of Regional History: The Case of Southeastern Utah (panel) (Room 101) Rediscovering Utah’s Native Voices (Room 101) Paiutes and the Circleville Massacre after 150 Years (panel) (Room 101) Religion and Race: Evaluating Religion of a Different Color: Race and the Mormon Struggle for Whiteness (panel) (Room 101)
What Paleontological, Perishable, and Coprolite Remains Tell Us About Past Cultures (Room 102) Under-documented Communities in Utah: Iosepa & Chinese Railroad Workers (panel) (Room 102) Pitching Tents and Breaking Trail: Three Historians Afield with the Utah War (Room 102) Diversity and Sport (Room 102)
Engaging Minorities and Making Room (Room 104) Disability Rights Movement in Utah and the Nation (panel) (Room 104) Immigration in Early Twentieth-Century Utah (Room 104) Two Changing Faces of Fundamentalist Mormonism (Room 104)
Politics and Religious Authority (Room 105) Documenting the Topaz Experience (Room 105) Many Voices in Utah History (Room 105) Native-White Interaction in Nineteenth-Century Utah (Room 105)
The Power of Oral History: Uncovering the Stories of Latino/as in Utah (panel) (Suite A) Latino Voices in Cache Valley (panel) (Suite A) Exploring Utah’s Multicultural Past through Oral History (panel) (Suite A)
Magna: An American Story (documentary) (Suite B) Splinters of a Nation: The Story of German Prisoners of War in Utah (documentary/panel) (Suite B) 1:45-3:15 — The Twelve Left Behind (documentary)
Speaking with Bishop John Wester (documentary)(Suite B)
Utah’s Polynesian History (panel) (Suite B)

Conference Session Descriptions

8:45 a.m. – 10:15 a.m. Track

The Breadth of Regional History: The Case of Southeastern Utah (Room 101)

  • Panel: Robert McPherson (chair), Floyd O’Neill, Allan Kent Powell, and Gary Topping

What Paleontological, Perishable, and Coprolite Remains Tell Us About Past Cultures (Room 102)

  • Lori Hunsaker (chair)
  • Daniel King: Jurassic Jones: The Archaeology of Paleontology
  • Joseph Bryce: Marks in the Clay: Impressions and What They Tell Us
  • Madison N. M. Pearce: Prehistoric Diets and Medicines of the Utah Great Basin: Using Ethnohistory to Explore Botanical Remains From Spotten Cave Human Coprolites

Engaging Minorities and Making Room (Room 104)

  • Elizabeth Heath (chair)
  • Lloyd S. Pendleton: Utah’s Ten Year Plan to End Chronic Homelessness
  • Gerrit van Dyk and Jeremy Ingersoll: Their Hispanic Heritage: The Preservation of Different Cultures in LDS Spanish-speaking Congregations

Politics and Religious Authority (Room 105)

  • Greg Thompson (chair)
  • Gary Bergera: Ezra Taft Benson Meets Nikita Khrushchev, 1959: Memory Embellished
  • Kenneth L Cannon II and Geoffrey E. Cannon: Separation of Prophet and State? The 1914 Reelection of Reed Smoot
  • Jason Friedman: “Unless the ‘Saints’ decorate my personage with plumage and ‘something to make it stick’”: Duncan McMillan and the fight for Wasatch Academy

Magna: An American Story (documentary) (Suite B)

  • Patricia Hull (chair) and Robert K. Avery

10:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. Track

Rediscovering Utah’s Native Voices (Room 101) AWC_50th_Logo_Color

  • Panel: Shirlee Silversmith (chair), Richard Turley, Brent Rogers, Gregory Smoak, Shoshone and Ute Native speakers


Under-documented Communities in Utah: Iosepa and Chinese Railroad Workers (Room 102) 

  • Panel: Benjamin Pykles (moderator), Anne Oliver, Sheri Murray-Ellis, and Ken Cannonadmin-ajax1
  • This session is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service


Disability Rights Movement in Utah and the Nation (Room 104)

  • Panel: Claire Mantonya (chair), Marilyn Bown, Sherry L. Repscher, and Barbara Toomer

Documenting the Topaz Experience (Room 105)

  • Kimberly M. Jew (chair)
    Scotti Hill: When Words Weren’t Enough: Curating the Topaz Museum’s Inaugural Art Exhibition
  • Jane Beckwith: A Founders View, Topaz Museum
  • Christian Heimburger: “We Have Come to Understand Them, and We Admit We Need Them”: Japanese American Laborers in the Interior West, 1942-1944

The Power of Oral History: Uncovering the Stories of Latino/as in Utah (Suite A) Redd Logo

  • Panel: Matt Basso (chair), Jennifer Macias, Juan Jose Garcia, Andrea Garavito Martinez



Splinters of a Nation: The Story of German Prisoners of War in Utah (documentary/panel) (Suite B)

  • Panel: Scott Porter, Allan Kent Powell

12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Lunch Program

Welcome: Gregory C. Thompson, Chair, Board of State History

Update on Division of State History: Brad Westwood, Director, Division of State History

2015 Annual Utah State History Awards: Gregory C. Thompson and Brad Westwood

Introduction of Dr. Pam Perlich: Dina Blaes, Vice-Chair, Board of State History

Keynote: Dr. Pam Perlich: Utah’s Hidden Diversity: Decoding Evidence from the Census

1:45 p.m. – 3:15 p.m. Track

Paiutes and the Circleville Massacre after 150 Years (Room 101) Westerners

  • Panel: Richard E. Turley Jr. (chair), Suzanne Catharine, Edward Leo Lyman, Albert Winkler


Pitching Tents and Breaking Trail: Three Historians Afield with the Utah War (Room 102) 

  • Ken Gallacher (chair)
  • Kenneth L. Alford (paper to be presented by William P. MacKinnon): “And a Bitter Experience It fortudougWas”: The Utah War and the 1858 Move South
  • James F. Martin: “Sibleys amongst the Snow”: Locating Old Camp Scott
  • William P. MacKinnon: Summing Up the Utah War: One Historian’s Twenty-first Century Conclusions

Immigration in Early Twentieth-Century Utah (Room 104)

  • John Sillito (chair)
  • Brian Whitney and Lorrie Rands: Immigrants at the Crossroads: An Oral History of Immigration into Ogden, Utah
  • Eileen Hallet Stone: Utah’s Jewish Agrarian Pioneers
  • Rochelle Kaplan: Jews in Utah: Not an Oxymoron!

Many Voices in Utah History (Room 105)

  • Colleen Whitley (chair)
  • Allen Dale Roberts: British Influence on Pioneer Utah’s Greek and Gothic Revival
  • David A. Hales and Sandra Dawn Brimhall: You’re a Woman. You Can’t Be a Certified Public Accountant: The Trials and Struggles of Hannah Claire Haines, Utah’s First Woman CPA and Prominent Business Woman
  • J. Seth Anderson:  “We’re Here, We’re Queer, We’re Fabulous, Get Used to Us!”: Queer Nation Utah, 1991-1992

Latino Voices in Cache Valley (Suite A)

  • Panel: Brad Cole (chair), Randy Williams, Eduardo Ortiz, Maria Luisa Spicer-Escalante

The Twelve Left Behind (documentary)
Speaking with Bishop John Wester (documentary) (Suite B)

  • Desk Top History’s film short “The Twelve Left Behind,” the story of Italian prisoners of war during World War II, produced by Kelly Nelson

3:30 – 5:00 p.m.

Religion and Race: Evaluating Religion of a Different Color: Race and the Mormon Struggle for Whiteness (Room 101)

  • Panel: Brad Westwood (chair), Martha Evans Bradley, David Rich Lewis, W. Paul Reeve, and LaShawn Williams-Schultz

Diversity and Sport (Room 102)

  • Richard Kimball (chair)
  • Joseph Soderborg: Wicket Mormons and Cricket Gentiles: Cultural Imperialism in Utah’s Sporting Past
  • Intermountain Cricket League Exhibition

Two Changing Faces of Fundamentalist Mormonism (Room 104)

  • Newell G. Bringhurst: The Transformation of Rulon Timpson Jeffs: From Devout Mormon to FLDS Prophet
  • Craig L. Foster: “Proclamations and Prophecies from a Prison Cell: How Warren Jeffs Continues to Control the FLDS

Native-White Interaction in Nineteenth-Century Utah (Room 105)

  • David Grua (chair)
  • Wendy Simmons Johnson: An Underground Store, the Skull Valley Goshute, and Red Ink: Contact Period in Rush Valley
  • Hadyn B. Call: Kidnapped and Purchased: Piecing Together the Story of Ruth Piede Call Davids—a Paiute Indian
  • Jim Keyes: Showdown in the Canyons: History of Interaction between Early Cattle Ranchers and Native Americans in Southeastern Utah.

Exploring Utah’s Multicultural Past through Oral History (Suite A)

  • Jodi Graham (chair)
  • Randy Williams: Cache Valley Refugee Voices
  • Deborah M. George: Root Sounds: The Utah African American Experience in Ogden
  • Sarah Singh: Twenty-fifth Street: The City That Never Slept

Utah’s Polynesian History (Suite B)

  • Panel: Philip Notarianni (chair), Jake Fitisemanu Jr., Ulysses Thomas Tongaoneval, Susi Feitch-Malohifo’ou, and others

Utah History Podcasts

Check out our collection of audio files from various events and programs of Utah State History.

Utah StateTelephoneOperator_edge History Brown Bag Presentations

Utah State History hosts a collection of Brown Bags every year. We recently began recording these presentations so you can listen and not miss a thing.

Listen to a mix of brown bags presented by a mix of lay and professional historians.


News_WagonUtah Historical Quarterly Web Extras

Early Utah Women Inventors: A Conversation with Christine Cooper-Rompato  – UHQ Summer 2015

Folklore and History: A Conversation with Steve Siporin – UHQ Spring 2015

Sounds of the Cathedral – UHQ Winter 2015

An Interview with Noel Carmack and Connell O’Donovan on the 1855 murder of Isaac Whitehouse in Parowan, Utah, and the Art of Historical Storytelling – UHQ Fall 2014


Veterans Utah History Project


Where were you when WWII ended?

The Division of State History and the Utah Department of Veterans & Military Affairs have joined together on the Veterans Utah History Project.

Whether you are a WWII veteran and want to document and share your experiences and memories or you want to volunteer to interview a WWII veteran there are opportunities to participate.

Visit the Utah Department of Veterans & Military Affairs website to learn more and get involved to collect, document and archive this important part of our history.

Teaching Materials

Below are some teaching resources for both teachers and anyone wanting to learn more about Utah Archaeology & Preservation.

Utah’s Prehistory

I Love History – Utah Archaeology

Utah Heritage Foundation

Historic Architecture Lesson Plans

More Lesson Plans for Teachers!

Utah State History Brown Bag Presentations

“Copy, Ink, and Diverse Voices: Ethnic and Vernacular Press in Utah History” with Dr. Joel Campbell – September 23, 2015.

“In With a Suitcase, Out With a Truck: Salt Lake City’s Historic Apartment Buildings of the Early 20th Century” with Lisa-Michele Church, J.D. – September 16, 2015.


A Summer Home for the People of Denver: Building Denver’s Mountain Parks, 1910-1940″ with Dr. Wendy Rex-Atzet – September 9, 2015.

Some Things She Should Know: Beauty Culture and Modern Womanhood in Salt Lake City, 1890-1930 with Melissa Coy – September 2, 2015

2015 Annual History Conference Session 4 Abstracts

3:30 – 5:00 p.m.

Religion and Race: Evaluating Religion of a Different Color: Race and the Mormon Struggle for Whiteness (Room 101)

  • Panel: Brad Westwood (chair), David Rich Lewis, Martha Bradley-Evans, W. Paul Reeve, and LaShawn Williams-Schultz

Diversity and Sport (Room 102)

  • Joseph Soderberg: Wicket Mormons and Cricket Gentiles: Cultural Imperialism in Utah’s Sporting Past
  • Intermountain Cricket League Exhibition

Religious and Cultural Difference (Room 104)

  • Craig L. Foster and Newell G. Bringhurst: Two Changing Faces of Fundamentalist Mormonism: Rulon and Warren Jeffs

Native-White Interaction in Nineteenth-Century Utah  (Room 105)

  • David Grua (chair)
  • Wendy Simmons Johnson: An Underground Store, the Skull Valley Goshute, and Red Ink:  Contact Period in Rush Valley
  • Hadyn B. Call: Kidnapped and Purchased: Piecing Together the Story of Ruth Piede Call Davids—a Paiute Indian
  • Jim Keyes: Showdown in the canyons: History of interaction between early cattle ranchers and Native Americans in southeastern Utah.

Exploring Utah’s Multicultural Past through Oral History (Suite A)

  • Panel:
    • Jodi Graham (chair)
    • Randy Williams: Cache Valley Refugee Voices
    • Deborah M. George: New Zion Community Advocates, Inc.
    • Sarah Langsdon Singh


Religion and Race: Evaluating Religion of a Different Color: Race and the Mormon Struggle for Whiteness
Panel Abstract
In Religion of a Different Color: Race and the Mormon Struggle for Whiteness, Paul Reeve explores nineteenth-century representations of Mormonism as a marginalized group physically different from the white Protestant majority. Reeve additionally chronicles Mormonism’s controversial history of race and blackness. Panelists will take a critical look at Reeve’s arguments within the context of race and religion in Utah and the United States.
Moderator: Brad Westwood, Director of the Utah Division of State History
David Rich Lewis, Professor of History at Utah State University
Martha Evans Bradley, Professor in the College of Architecture + Planning, University of Utah
W. Paul Reeve, Associate Professor of History at University of Utah. His Religion of a Different Color: Race and the Mormon Struggle for Whiteness was published by the Oxford University Press.
LaShawn Williams-Schultz teaches African-American culture at Salt Lake Community College

Joseph Soderberg has a bachelor’s degree in history from Utah State University and a Certificate of International Relations. He lived in Wales for a year and studied at the University of Wales at Swansea. Soderberg has worked in the on-demand publishing business and done freelance genealogical and historical research. He has lived in St. Petersburg, Russia, and Guangzhou, China, while teaching English in those locations. He has presented papers on Utah, American, and Mormon history. He is currently working with John Peterson as his research assistant on his forthcoming book “Brigham’s Bastion,” a history of Pipe Spring National Monument.