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2016 State History Conference Schedule

**Conference At A Glance

Friday, Sept. 30th, 2016
Utah Cultural Celebration Center

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Plenary Session (Great Hall)

Panel: Gregory Smoak (moderator), Leisl Carr Childers, and Jay Taylor

Historical Perspectives on the Public Lands Debate in the American West

Leisl Carr Childers photoLeisl Carr Childers
is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Northern Iowa where she coordinates the Public History program and teaches the American West. She earned her doctorate at the University of Nevada Las Vegas, where she worked as the Assistant Director of the Nevada Test Site Oral History Project. She garnered several awards for her research on the Great Basin, including UNLV’s prestigious President’s Fellowship, UNI’s Faculty Summer Fellowship, and the Charles Redd Center for Western Studies Summer and Publication Awards. Her experiences collecting oral histories from those who worked at the test site or were affected by nuclear testing in addition to her own recreational activities on public lands provided the foundation for her project. Her first book, The Size of the Risk: Histories of Multiple Use in the Great Basin, received a Spur Award from the Western Writers of America and has garnered praise from reviewers in journals diverse as Montana The Magazine of Western History and the American Historical Review.

Jay Taylor photoJoseph E. Taylor III is a professor of history at Simon Fraser University. He has written broadly about gentrification and the struggles to control access to natural resources, including Making Salmon, about the fisheries crisis in the Pacific Northwest, and Pilgrims of the Vertical, about the cultural and environmental stakes of modern rock climbing. His current research focuses on the legislative history of Progressive Era and New Deal conservation, and he is mapping the history of transfer payments to western counties for activities occurring on federal lands.


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World War I in Rural Utah (Room 101)

  • Robert S. Voyles (chair)
  • Kerry William Bate: Kanarraville Women Fight World War I
  • Robert S. McPherson: Native American Reaction to World War I
  • Allan Kent Powell: World War I in Castle Valley: The Impact of the War on Carbon and Emery Counties

Early Rural Utah in the Uinta Basin (Room 102)

  • Lee Kreutzer (chair)
  • Elizabeth Hora-Cook: Public Spaces and Private Places: The Construction of Social Landscapes in Jones Hole Canyon, Utah
  • Judson Byrd Finley: The Fremont Archaeology of Dinosaur National Monument: Fifty Years after Breternitz

Evaluating The Awkward State of Utah (Room 104)

  • Panel: Brad Westwood (moderator), Jay H. Buckley, Brian Q. Cannon, Matthew Godfrey, Lisa Olsen Tait, John Sillito

Accessing Statewide Heritage Resources (Room105)

  • Panel: Roger Roper (moderator)

Representatives from several agencies and organizations will describe the programs (including grants) they have for assisting communities with history-related projects.

Bringing the Art of Decorative Paper Cutting into the Twenty-first Century (Board Room)

  • Susannah Nilsson

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Lunch Program

12:10 p.m. Welcome
Dina Blaes, Chair, Board of State History

12:15 p.m. Update on Division of State History
Brad Westwood, Director, Division of State History

12:20 p.m. 2016 Annual Utah State History Awards
Dina Blaes, Chair, Board of State History

12:35 p.m. Introduction of Dr. Patty Limerick
Dina Blaes, Chair, Board of State History

12:40 p.m. Keynote
Dr. Patty Limerick

Patty Limerick is the Faculty Director and Chair of the Board of the Center of the American West at the University of Colorado, where she is also a Professor of History. Limerick received her Ph.D. in American Studies from Yale University in Yale University in 1980, and from 1980 to 1984 she was an Assistant Professor of History at Harvard. In 1985 she published Desert Passages, followed in 1987 by her best-known work, The Legacy of Conquest, an overview and reinterpretation of Western American history that has stirred up a great deal of both academic and public debate. In 2012 she published A Ditch in Time: The City, the West, and Water, a history of water in Denver. Limerick is also a prolific essayist.

Limerick has received a number of awards and honors recognizing the impact of her scholarship and her commitment to teaching, including the MacArthur Fellowship (1995 to 2000) and the Hazel Barnes Prize, the University of Colorado’s highest award for teaching and research (2001). She has chaired the 2011 Pulitzer jury in History.

Limerick has served as President of the Organization of American Historians, American Studies Association, the Western History Association, and the Society of American Historians, and as the Vice President of the Teaching Division of the American Historical Association. She is currently the President of the Organization of American Historians.

In 1986, Limerick co-founded the Center of the American West, and since 1995 it has been her primary point of affiliation. During her tenure, the Center has published a number of books, including the influential Atlas of the New West (1997), and a series of lively, balanced, and to-the-point reports on compelling Western issues.

The Center of the American West serves as a forum committed to the civil, respectful, problem-solving exploration of important, often contentious, public issues.


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What Role Do Historians Play in Public Land and Water Policy? (Rooms 101 & 102)

  • Panel: Patty Limerick, Joseph E. Taylor III, Leisl Carr Childers, and Jedediah Rogers (moderator)

The conference theme provides a forum for historians and scholars to apply their methodology and discipline to questions that have contemporary—and, frequently, political—resonance. But what role, precisely, does the historian play in contributing to sensitive, political issues over public lands, water, and environmental conflict? The discussion will focus not so much on public lands and water as on the boundaries, limitations, and strengths of the discipline of history to pressing contemporary western issues.

New Methods, Historical Innovation (Room 104)

  • Gregory C. Thompson (chair)
  • Justin Sorensen: Exploring Utah’s Nuclear History through the Downwinders of Utah Archive
  • Cami Ann Dilg: The past that was differs little from the past that was not”: Pictographs and Petroglyphs in Cormac McCarthy’s Blood Meridian or the Evening Redness in the West
  • Kenneth P. Cannon: Across the Desert: The Archaeology of the Chinese Railroad Workers, Box Elder County, Utah

Evolving Small Towns (Room 105)

  • Dina Blaes (chair)
  • Linda Thatcher: J. C. Penney Stores and How They Changed Rural Main Streets in Utah
  • Michael Hansen: Plat for the City of Zion: Past, Present, and Future
  • Shannon Ellsworth: Handcarts, Homesteads, and Hipsters: What Millennials Have in Common with Mormon Pioneers

Death and Crime (Great Hall – west)

  • Colleen Whitley (chair)
  • Kenneth L. Cannon II: Frank Cannon, the Salt Lake Tribune, and the Alta Club
  • David A. Hales: Being Deputized
  • Walter R. Jones: A Tragic Set of Events in Early-Twentieth-Century Rural Uinta County, Wyoming

Lark, Utah: A Public History Event (Great Hall – east)

  • Christopher Merritt

Lark Oral Histories (Board Room)


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Rural Utah, National Destinations: Developing Utah’s National Parks (Rooms 101 & 102)

  • Leighton M. Quarles (chair and moderator)
  • Susan Rhoades Neel: National Park Expansion in Utah during the New Deal
  • Paula Mitchell: The Grand Circle Tour: Early Tourism in Zion, Bryce, North Rim, and Cedar Breaks
  • Michael Shamo: Creating Canyonlands: Southeastern Utah’s Bid to Benefit from Federal Lands

This hybrid paper session/panel discussion explores the dynamics of national park development in Utah with an emphasis on interaction with and impact on surrounding communities. Following the presentations a brief panel discussion will address the ongoing relevance of these overlapping histories.

Voices from the Desert: Rural Issues in Southeastern Utah (Room 104)

  • Panel: Robert S. McPherson (moderator and panelist), Winston Hurst, Rick Eldredge, TBA

Participants will address the loss and acquisition of land by Native Americans; the use and abuse of Ancestral Puebloan sites and artifacts; the multifaceted issues of law enforcement in a complex, disputed environment; and the impact of the Grand-Staircase Monument on residents twenty years after its inception. Moving from past to present, panelists will share views on how history has shaped contemporary issues.

Land Stewardship in Northern Utah (Room 105)

  • Dave Whittekiend (chair)
  • Charles Condrat: Watersheds and Historic Properties: Environmental Rehabilitation and Resulting Affects to Historic Character
  • Carol Majeske: Collaborative Efforts and Successful Reforestation, a History of the Salt Lake Forest Reserve
  • Rachelle Handley: The Legacy of Recreation and Historic Buildings: Preservation and Adaptive Re-Use on the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest
  • Scott Bushman: John Fell Squires and the Creation of the Logan Forest Reserve

Industrial and Natural Landscapes (Great Hall – west)

  • Nelson Knight (chair)
  • Mark Karpinski: Utah Coal Company Towns: Rural Towns Created to Fuel Western Urbanization
  • Susie Petheram: The Jordan River Then and Now: From Rural Resource to Urban Resource
  • Jessica F. Montcalm: Echoes from the Camp: Sego as a Case Study in Identifying an Industrial Landscape

Lark, Utah: A Public History Event (Great Hall – east)

  • Christopher Merritt

Lark Oral Histories (Board Room)

2016 State History Conference Workshop Schedule

**Conference At A Glance

Thursday, Sept. 29th, 2016
Conference Workshops/Seminars
Rio Grande Depot

9:00 am – noon

 

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Seminar (Zephyr Room)  (SEMINAR IS FULL)
Megan van Frank and Jedediah Rogers

Oral history is a powerful tool for people to understand their family stories and community history. Whether used for scholarly research, finding community stories, or fleshing out one’s family history, oral history provides unusual access to stories not otherwise known or in danger of being lost. This workshop will provide a focused introduction to the art and craft of oral history: to the philosophical underpinnings of the discipline—what it can, and cannot, tell us about the past—and to the nuts and bolts of executing successful oral history projects. Participants will learn how to make pre-interview preparations, interact with interviewees, conduct interviews, and transcribe and archive recorded interviews. They will receive experiential practice preparing probing questions, conducting an interview, and editing an oral history transcript. An orientation to the Utah Humanities and Utah Division of State History joint oral history program will also be provided.

Megan van Frank directs community history and museums programming for Utah Humanities.
Jedediah Rogers is a Senior State Historian at the Utah Division of State History and co-managing editor of the Utah Historical Quarterly.

Co-sponsored by Utah Humanities.


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Workshop (West Lecture Room)
Roger Roper and Cory Jensen

This workshop session will address the basic components—and many of the nuances—of evaluating historic buildings. It will cover assessments of historic integrity, evaluations of significance (National Register eligibility), the affects of additions and alterations, and appropriate and inappropriate rehabilitation work. The wide-ranging discussion should be of interest to cultural resource professionals as well as amateur old-building aficionados.

Part I, Historic Building Evaluations, will address a wide variety of issues and examples related to the following:

  • Assessing the historic integrity of buildings and structures, including the effect of alterations and additions. Can “really significant” properties absorb more changes without losing their integrity? How can the “seven aspects of integrity” be applied most effectively? What other tools and cues can be used to make valid assessments?
  • Evaluating the National Register eligibility of historic properties. How much information is needed to make an appropriate evaluation? Does the evaluation process vary depending on which criteria you are trying to use? How “final” are evaluations? Under what circumstances can evaluations be changed?
  • Assessing “effects” of undertakings for Section 106 purposes. What types of impacts trigger “adverse effects”? Do those same types of impacts affect a property’s historic integrity or National Register eligibility? Would any of those impacts ever be allowed on a certified rehabilitation tax credit project?
  • Using “phased documentation” to assess historic properties incrementally, as funding and other needs dictate. When is it appropriate to “make a call” on integrity and eligibility without full documentation? Are there legal ramifications or procedural improprieties in doing so?

Part II, “What’s New with the Old National Register,” goes beyond the basics of conducting historic building surveys and preparing National Register nominations. It focuses more on some of the nuances involved in both processes, things that can either trip you up or smooth your path to project completion. It also addresses recent issues and trends that have emerged either nationally or statewide, including using online resources for conducting “digital surveys” and conducting historical research.

Roger Roper has been working in historic preservation since 1980, first as a consultant then in state historic preservation offices in both Utah and Oregon. He taught historic preservation as an adjunct professor at the University of Utah for 10 years, and he served as editor of the award-winning Utah Preservation magazine during most of its ten-year run. He is currently the Deputy SHPO for historic preservation with the Utah Division of State History (Utah SHPO).
Cory Jensen is a Program Specialist and Architectural Historian at the Utah State Historic Preservation Office.  Along with coordinating the National Register of Historic Places program for the state, he also manages the architectural survey program and performs Section 106 Review compliance for Utah Dept. of Transportation-related projects. Cory received his MS degree in Historic Preservation at the University of Utah, where he is an adjunct assistant professor, teaching a course in historic building documentation.


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Seminar (Utah State Archives Training Room 346 S. Rio Grande St)
Christina Epperson and Tessie Burningham

We will show you how to find our historical data-sets and map gallery, both available online. Participants will learn about different online resources for historical aerial imagery and learn steps to overlay a historical map onto Google Earth. Then we will give a brief introduction to a free mapping program called ArcGIS online and review the capabilities and resources available for historians.

Christina Epperson is GIS Analyst, Utah Division of State History
Tessie Burningham is Records Assistant with the Antiquities Section, Utah Division of State History


4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

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Workshop (Zephyr Room)
Elizabeth Hora-Cook and Deb Miller

The Utah Division of State History (UDSH) announces a new teacher training workshop as a part of the Utah State History Conference. This workshop will present a complete module that introduces students to Utah prehistory, develops evidence-based critical thinking skills, and embodies an important message about archaeological stewardship. As a part of UDSH’s mission to preserve and share the past, we designed a 90 minute module that can articulate with 4th and 7th grade social studies curriculums. The workshop will introduce teachers to Utah prehistory and provide instruction for how to use the teaching module. We will offer free materials during the training and direct educators to other online teaching resources.

Elizabeth Hora-Cook is Cultural Compliance Reviewer with the Antiquities Section, Utah Division of State History.
Deb Miller is GIS Specialist and Assistant Archaeology Records Manager, Utah Division of State History.

UHQ Summer 2016 Web Extra “Remembering the Circleville Massacre”


This year marks the sesquicentennial of a tragic event: the massacre of nearly an entire band of Paiutes by Mormon settlers during the Black Hawk War.

Jedediah Rogers, “Remembering the Circleville Massacre” 

Bibliography

UHQ Web Extras Summer 2016, “Utah’s Spaceport: A Failed Dream”

Utah presented a compelling case to be used as NASA’s operational site, but the decision to use solid-fuel boosters on the space shuttle made this impossible.

Eric G. Swedin, “Utah’s Spaceport: A Failed Dream” 

[text and links on this article]

UHQ Web Extras Summer 2016, “George Dewey Clyde and the Harvest of Snow”

Robert E. Parson, “George Dewey Clyde and the Harvest of Snow”

Clyde championed storage reservoirs to con­serve the harvest of snow.

[text and links on this article]

UHQ Web Extras Summer 2016, “News from Salt Lake, 1847–1849”

Andrew H. Hedges, “News from Salt Lake, 1847–1849”

How Information About Utah Was Collected and Disseminated Throughout the Country

[replace with text and links on this article]

UHQ Summer 2016 Web Extras

Salacious Broadway Show on Mormon Polygamy

Kenneth L. Cannon II, “Mormons on Broadway, 1914 Style"

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How Information About Utah Was Collected and Disseminated Throughout the Country

Andrew H. Hedges, "News from Salt Lake, 1847--1849"

[replace with text and links on this article]

 

 


Clyde championed storage reservoirs to con­serve the harvest of snow.

Robert E. Parson, "George Dewey Clyde and the Harvest of Snow"

[text and links on this article]

 

 


Utah presented a compelling case to be used as NASA’s operational site, but the decision to use solid-fuel boosters on the space shuttle made this impossible.

Eric G. Swedin, "Utah's Spaceport: A Failed Dream" 

[text and links on this article]

 

 


This year marks the sesquicentennial of a tragic event: the massacre of nearly an entire band of Paiutes by Mormon settlers during the Black Hawk War.

Jedediah Rogers, "Remembering the Circleville Massacre" 

Bibliography

 

 


 

 

Rural Utah, Western Issues – 64th Annual Utah State History Conference Program

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Conference at a Glance

Conference Workshops, Seminars
Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016
9:00 a.m. – noon
4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Rio Grande Depot
300 S. Rio Grande Street
Salt Lake City, UT

9:00 a.m. –  noon Introduction to Oral History (Zephyr Room) (WORKSHOP IS FULL)
(Co-sponsored by Utah Humanities)
9:00 a.m. –  noon Historic Preservation Workshop (West Lecture Room)
9:00 a.m. – noon Well, isn’t that Spatial?”: GIS, Mapping Historical and Cultural Resources (Utah State Archives Training Room – 346 S. Rio Grande Street)
4:00 p.m – 6:00 p.m. Teacher Training Prehistory Workshop (Zephyr Room)

 

Conference Panels, Sessions
Friday, Sept. 30, 2016
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Utah Cultural Celebration Center
1355 West 3100 South
West Valley, UT

9:00 – 10:15 a.m. Plenary Session: Historical Perspectives on the Public Lands Debate in the American West: Dr. Gregory Smoak, Dr. Leisl Carr Childers, Dr. Joseph E. Taylor III (Great Hall)
10:30 – 11:45 a.m. World War I in Utah (Room 101)
Early Rural Utah in the Uinta Basin (Room 102)
  Evaluating The Awkward State of Utah (Room 104)
  Accessing Statewide Heritage Resources (Room 105)
  Bringing the Art of Decorative Paper Cutting into the Twenty-first Century (Board Room)
12 – 1:30 p.m. Keynote: Dr. Patty Limerick (Great Hall)
1:45 – 3:00 p.m. What Role Do Historians Play in Public Land and Water Policy? (Rooms 101 & 102)
  New Methods, Historical Innovation (Room 104)
  Evolving Small Towns (Room 105)
  Death and Crime (Great Hall – west)
  Lark Public Event (Great Hall – east)
  Lark Oral Histories (Board Room)
3:15 – 4:30 p.m. Rural Utah, National Destinations (Rooms 101 & 102)
  Voices from the Desert: Rural Issues in Southeastern Utah (Room 104)
  Land Stewardship in Northern Utah (Room 105)
  Industrial and Natural Landscapes (Great Hall – west)
  Lark Public Event (Great Hall – east)
  Lark Oral Histories (Board Room)

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Conference Tour
Saturday, Oct. 1, 2016
9:00 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Hosted by Fort Douglas Military Museum.   Battle or massacre? Historians still debate the events of that cold winter day in January 1863 when soldiers from Camp Douglas attacked a village of Shoshone on the Bear River near the Utah-Idaho border. Follow the route of the soldiers as the marched north from Camp Doulas and walk the site of the actual battle. An informative and thought provoking day exploring Utah’s historic past.

Cost:     $65 per person (includes transportation, lunch and field trip booklet)

**Please note that a separate paid registration is required for this tour and is not part of the free conference.  Please call 801-581-1251 or email admin@fortdouglas.org to register.