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Category Archives: History

Detailed History Sessions “Local Matters”

10/11/2017 Utah Cultural Celebration Center
Time Session Titles and Speakers
10:30 – 11:45am Familiar Places: Glimpses of Home and Community

Alan B. Barnett
There’s No Place Like Home: Named Houses in Utah

Bruce W. Worthen
Voices from a Distant Town: Community Formation in the Remote Settlements of Antebellum Utah

Clint Pumphrey
Daggett County at 100: New Approaches to a Colorful Past

National Institutions, Local Crises

J. Scott Bushman
A History of Fighting Forest Fires in Northern Utah:  Local Initiatives that Contributed to National Solutions

Joseph F. Darowski
Struggling with the Three Rs: Relief, Recovery, and Reform in Utah during the Great Depression (1930–1940)

Ben Kiser
When the Army Came to Town:  WWII, the Cold War, and the Aftermath in Tooele County

  Territorial History and Its Records

Kenneth Alford
Utah and the American Civil War: The Written Record

Richard Quartaroli
John Wesley Powell’s Explorations and Surveying of the Colorado River and Its Tributaries, 1871–1872, with the Assistance of Mormon Communities

Richard Holzapfel
My Dear Brother: Martha Ann Smith Harris Letters from Salt Lake City and Provo, 1856–1916

  The Impact of Independent Film on Local Communities

Kelly Nelson
Utah Film Center, Utah Film Commission, Sundance

Mike Homer
Institute, Utah Film Makers

Noon – 1:30pm Lunch

Keynote
Ken Verdoia
I’m Not A Historian, But I Played One on TV

2017 Outstanding Achievement Awards Program
Dina Blaes, Chair Board of State History

1:45 – 3:00pm Food and Culture: Daily Life in Northern Utah

Darcy Pumphrey
Brigham Young College: A Case Study in LDS Education at the Turn of the Twentieth Century

Cody Patton
Beehive Brews: The Surprising Story of Beer in Utah

Lisa Barr
Local Food Producers of Cache Valley, Utah

 

Pedagogy in the Digital Era

Haydn B. Call
The Driven 2 Teach Program: A History

Brenden Rensink, Brent Rogers, Jay H. Buckley Making Local History Digital: Intermountain Histories

Historic Preservation in Salt Lake City

William G. Hartley
One Salt Lake Landmark Saved, One Left to Disintegrate:  Nicholas G. Morgan and Architect Edward O. Anderson’s Crusade to Save the Old City Hall and Turn Pioneer Park into a Jewel

Walter Jones
Salt Lake City’s Magnificent Knutsford Hotel

Nan Weber and Allen Roberts
The Salt Lake City Building Legacy of Master Architect Richard K. A. Kletting

  Knowledge is Power: Education in Utah

Mervin Brewer
Echoes from the Chalkboard: Public School Buildings of the Past

Mark W. Buchanan
“School in the Other Fellows Town Seven Miles Distant”: Cache County School Consolidation, 1908

Brett D. Dowdle
“Putting Our Clutches to His Very Throat”: The Reconstruction of Education in Utah, 1867–1890

Writing Regional History: Gary Topping’s Utah Historians and the Reconstruction of Western History

Gary Topping, Polly Aird, Richard Saunders, Gary Bergera, Jedediah Roberts (moderator)

3:15 – 4:30pm Cache Valley Utah Drug Court Oral History Project: A Community-Driven Effort

Randy Williams, Jennifer Duncan, Thomas L. Willmore, Brock Alder

Religion and the Community

Alan J. Clark
“I’m Going Through”: Bringing Pentecostal Christianity to Utah

Jeffery O. Johnson
“Shaking the Tree”: The Impact of Signature Books on the Mormon Community

Jessica Nelson
Mormonism and the Negro, African Americans, and LDS Racism at Utah State University, 1960–1961

Cooperation and the Preservation of Historic Places

Adriane Herrick Juarez
Honoring the Past, Moving into the Future: The Renovation of the Historic Park City Library

Lisa Michele Church
The Page Ranch Story: Preserving a Local Treasure

Leighton M. Quarles
The Fort Douglas Heritage Commons: A Model of Public-Private Cooperation in Historic Preservation

Joe Hill Project

Jeremy Harmon

Understanding 20th-century Utah: James Allen’s Still the Right Place:  Utah’s Second Half-Century of Statehood, 1945-1995

James Allen

Board of State History

Meeting Agenda
Thursday, July 20, 2017, 12:00 – 3:00 pm
Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande Street, Board Room


TIME:  Noon 
– working lunch for Board members, hosted by State History

12:15 p.m. – WELCOME – Dina Blaes, Chair

STATE HISTORY INTERNS INTRODUCTIONS (5 min)

APRIL – JUNE STATE HISTORY PROGRAM ACCOMPLISHMENTS
Brad Westwood – Administration (5 min)
1. With Vet Affairs, worked with the Legislature to offer funding for the 100th anniversary of WWI and its impact on Utah.  WWI grants program launched the first of July.
2.  Executing the annual evaluation of program managers’ performance for the last year, and assisting them in planning and goal setting for 2017-18

Chris Merritt  – Antiquities (5 min)
1. Archaeology & Preservation Month.  *62 events, 20 counties. Estimated 4,000 attendees.
2. Next Generation Workflows:  e106-Beta Stage (Fall Launch), PresPro-Contract Signed (Fall Launch), Database Rebuild 300,000+ Records (Fall Launch)
3. Documentation Efforts:  Smith Family Rock Art Preserve, Utah County, Lime Kilns, University of Utah

Roger Roper – Historic Preservation (5 min)
1. Co-hosted the national Vernacular Architecture Forum (VAF) conference, May 31 – June 3.
2. Helped celebrate Archaeology and Historic Preservation Month in May.
3. Dedication of the 1899 Spring City School as the new town hall and community center.

Wendy Rex-Atzet – History Day (5 min)
1. National History Day Competition, June 11-15.  57 students, 10 teachers.  2 Projects National Top Ten & the George Washington Leadership Award.  Highlights: Ken Burns, Joan Trumpauer Mullholland, Ballet Russe @ Smithsonian, Rob Bishop, Mike Lee
2. Utah History Day Census
3.  Friend Utah History Day on Facebook

Doug Misner – Library and Collections (5 min)
1. Digitization – Published the Ray King Collection and the Frederick and Nellie Hill Collection and added 682 images to our Digital Collections page.
2.  Collection Access – New collections catalog went live at the end of May. 64,000 items are now searchable by the public in a very easy to use system.  Held kick off meeting with our collection management system vendor. Met with CRSA to discuss and review plans for the research center redesign.
3. Collection Storage – working on a basement and offsite storage plan.

Jed Rogers, Holly George – Utah Historical Quarterly (5 min)
1. Public History –  Conference preparation: organizing the program; working with book and article award committees;  WWI commission: grants available for commemorative products and events; and announcing our first Miriam Murphy UHQ Fellow.
2. Utah Historical Quarterly, Summer 2017 issue –  The University of Utah and the Utes, by Larry Gerlach;   Rape Law in World War II-Era Utah, by Michaele Smith;  Creation of Cedar Breaks National Monument, 1916–1934, by Dale Topham;  Cooperative Boosterism along U.S. Highway 89, by Clint Pumphrey and Jim Kichas;  Nineteenth-Century Mormon Girls and Their Manuscript Newspapers by Jennifer Reeder

Kevin Fayles – Communications (5 min)
1. Website stats and social media
2. Cemetery and burials database
3. USHS and State History Anniversaries

 

 ACTION ITEMS 

  1. Approval of the April 20, 2017 Board of State History Meeting Minutes – Dina Blaes
    (Board motion required) (3 min)
  2. Committee reports
    (Board motion required if any action items are requested)
    A) Major Planning, Gifts & Awards Committee – Mike Homer (5 min)
    B) Library, Collections & Digitization Committee – Steve Olsen (5 min)
            a) Proposed Digitization Policy update (5 min)
    C) Utah State Historical Society Committee – David Rich Lewis (5 min)
    D) Historic Preservation & Archaeology Committee – David Richardson (5 min)
    a) National Register of Historic Places Nominations – Cory Jensen (25 min)
    Summaries of National Register of Historic Places Nominations
    Myton Presbyterian Church. Myton, Duchesne County
    Moon House Complex, San Juan County(federal nomination for review, no approval needed)
    US Post Office, Provo, Utah County(federal nomination for review, no approval needed)
  3. Approval of 2017 Outstanding Achievement Award nominations – Kevin Fayles (15 min)
    (Board motion required)

TRAINING

Open and Public Meetings Act – Thom Roberts (15 min)

DISCUSSION ITEMS

  1. Review of 2017 Utah State Historical Society awards (5 min)
    a) Publication Award nominations – Holly George
    b) William P. MacKinnon Award and Helen Papanikolas Award – Brad Westwood
  2. State History’s 2017-18 mission statement – Brad Westwood (5 min)
  3. State History Annual Conference “Local Matters” – Staff (5 min)
  4. Suggested agenda items and locations for Oct. 26, 2017 Board Retreat – Alycia Rowley (5 min)

OTHER BUSINESS

NEXT MEETING:  October 26, 2017, 9:00 am – 3:00 pm, Location TBD

ADJOURN

 

Modernism at the University of Utah: Research Notes

Editors’ note: Bim Oliver, author of “Modernism on Campus: Architecture at the University of Utah, 1945-1975,” offers readers excerpts and quotes from his research notes, including information on university building projects that never materialized and humorous quotes from reports and primary source documents.


University Building Projects That Didn’t Materialize

Like many of the buildings in the post-World War II era, Merrill Engineering was constructed in phases.

The building that exists constitutes the first three phases of the project, completed in relatively short order starting in the late 1950s. But the original concept for the engineering center also envisioned both a circular auditorium and a six-story classroom building. The former was dropped early on, but the classroom building remained an integral part of the center’s design as “Phase IV.” It was never constructed, however, due to lack of funding.

This initial concept for the Merrill Engineering Center included a circular auditorium and six-story classroom building. Courtesy of University of Utah Marriott Library Special Collections.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As the Olpin Union was nearing completion, the Campus Planning Committee contemplated the construction of a “campanile” (bell tower) in the open space just south of the new building. “The campus badly needs some symbol indicative of education that will complete the triangle within the city,” the committee observed in 1958, “i.e., the capitol dome represents State government, the temple, religion and perhaps a campanile to represent education, and which can be plainly seen just as the other two elements are.” Although the campanile was never built, the Social and Behavioral Sciences Building eventually served as the landmark envisioned by the committee.

The original plans for the Union building included a “campanile” or bell tower in the area to the south of the building. Courtesy of University of Utah Archives.

 

The bookstore today occupies the same site that it occupied in the years following World War II. Busy as it is today, it was considered of secondary significance by university planners. More to the point, they felt that its location was better suited for “a heavy use faculty, administrative or academic use.” So they considered two primary alternatives: a new building north of the Union and a structure between the Union and Orson Spencer Hall, “designed as an underground facility, with the floor level approximately the same as the level of the major academic mall.” Due to funding limitations, however, neither was constructed.

As noted in the related article, the primary funder of Pioneer Memorial Theater, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, asked the architects to draw up plans for Pioneer Memorial Theater as a structure that replicated the Salt Lake Theater that had been located downtown for several decades. An early drawing shows this replica that was later dispensed with in favor of a more Modernist design that better accommodated the technical requirements of the theater.

An early rendering of Pioneer Memorial Theater as a replica of the Salt Lake Theater. Courtesy of University of Utah Archives.

There were other proposals—some conceptual, some refined—that would have significantly changed the character of campus:

  • Two campus planning maps from 1959 and 1960 showed the library as an octagon and a circle, respectively, rather than the square that exists today. As the design was finalized, administrators suggested etching inspirational quotations into the cast-stone panels that enclosed the library, an idea rejected by the architects.
  • Early site plans and renderings of the plaza to the east of the Social and Behavioral Sciences Building envisioned an elaborate fountain.
  • An architect’s rendering of the Eccles Health Sciences Library included an expansive plaza between the library to the east, the Medical Center to the north, and the College of Pharmacy to the south.
  • Options for the medical towers and townhouses south of the Medical Center included the use of Sunset Tower (recently completed at 40 South 900 East), as well as a much larger complex on the current site that would have incorporated a varying configuration of high rises and lower “garden type” apartments.
  • In the late 1960s, as the university sought to increase its supply of married student housing, planners considered developing over 200 units at the mouth of Red Butte Canyon.
  • A primary goal during the post-World War II era was to concentrate academic buildings near the center of campus. One concept considered for achieving this goal was to construct two 14-story structures—one for the Chemistry Department and one for the Physics Department. As one planner noted, however, “Shoehorning two such units into that restricted area would be most difficult, as well as visually unpleasant.”
  • Early renderings and models for the Medical Center, Special Events Center, College of Pharmacy, and Physics Building reflect significantly different design ideas than those that were actually constructed.

    Humorous Quotes

  • “This will be a place where future wives will be trained on how to turn out the hash without burning it.” (W.J. O’Connor, chair of the Board of Regents, at the October 1951 groundbreaking for the Sterling Sill Home Living Center)
  • “At an earlier date, I received a memo from you posing the hazard that the rocks to the east of the Union Building and Orson Spencer Hall could be if we were to have a riot on campus.” (Memo from B. Blain Bradford to Bruce H. Jensen in July of 1970)
  • “Most people would agree that the fountain (Tanner Fountain across the plaza from the library) seems to be attracting the ‘undesirable’ hippie type clientele who are oftentimes quite dirty and unkempt.” (Memo from J Elroy Jones in July of 1970)

    Tanner Fountain. Courtesy of University of Utah Archives.

  • “Dean Hiner (College of Pharmacy) said his faculty could get along with anybody; however, if it (the site for the new College of Pharmacy building) went to the Medical Center he wanted it understood that his profession was a dignified profession and was not to be browbeaten by the Medics.” (Memo from Martin Brixen in March of 1958)
  • “Since the development of married student housing will cut out about four holes on the golf course, it was decided that detailed plans should be drawn up as quickly as possible in order that it could be explained to the Fort Douglas Club people.” (Minutes of the Planning Committee in August of 1956)
  • Avard Fairbanks first dean of the College of Fine Arts (reacting to the emergence of Modernist ideas on campus): “The corruption of art students’ principles stems from being exposed to foreign art manglers, the subversive doctrine of [-]isms, Communist-inspired and Communist-connected. These influences have one boasted goal: the destruction of our cultural tradition and priceless heritage.” (quoted in Anne Palmer Peterson.Years of Promise: The University of Utah’s A. Ray Olpin Era, 1946-1964. Salt Lake City, Utah: University of Utah Press, 2009.)
  • Orson Spencer Hole (Utah Daily Chronicle, April 17, 1956) Image 2
  • From the Utah Daily Chronicle, April 17, 1956. Courtesy of Utah Digital Newspapers.

Historic Preservation and Sites of Conscience: A Conversation with Kirk Huffaker

Editors’ note: We sat down with Kirk Huffaker, executive director of Preservation Utah and author of Salt Lake City, Then and Now (2008), to discuss the role of historic preservation at places of meaning, what he refers to as sites of conscience. Huffaker is guest editor of the winter 2017 issue of the Utah Historical Quarterly.


Huffaker Interview Part I

Huffaker Interview Part II

 

UHQ Winter 2017 Web Extras

Historic Preservation and Sites of Conscience: A Conversation with Kirk Huffaker

We sat down with Kirk Huffaker, executive director of Preservation Utah and author of Salt Lake City, Then and Now (2008), to discuss the role of historic preservation at places of meaning, what he refers to as sites of conscience. Huffaker is guest editor of the winter 2017 issue of the Utah Historical Quarterly.

 

Modernism at the University of Utah: Research Notes

Bim Oliver, author of “Modernism on Campus: Architecture at the University of Utah, 1945-1975,” offers readers excerpts and quotes from his research notes regarding modernism at the university.

 

Forest Service Architectural Plans and Manuals, 1935-1940

These Forest Service architectural plans and manuals, published between 1935 and 1940, depict the styles and layouts then common to Forest Service structures.

 

 

Archaeology Publications

Are you interested in Utah Archaeology? Utah Archaeology is an annual publication of USAS, UPAC, and the Utah Division of State History. The journal focuses on prehistoric and historic archaeological research relevant to Utah.

You will also be able to view all publications related to Utah Archaeology.

Search Utah Archaeology Publications


Modernism at the University of Utah

Editors’ Note: Bim Oliver, author of “Modernism on Campus: Architecture at the University of Utah, 1945-1975,” offers here information on mid-century university building plans that never materialized. Through the process of researching modernism at the University of Utah, Oliver compiled a list of quotations that reveal a light, humorous side of university officials–and these are reproduced below. Finally, we offer additional photographs that didn’t make it into the published article.


Projects That Didn’t Materialize

Like many of the buildings in the post-World War II era, Merrill Engineering was constructed in phases.

The building that exists constitutes the first three phases of the project, completed in relatively short order starting in the late 1950s. But the original concept for the engineering center also envisioned both a circular auditorium and a six-story classroom building. The former was dropped early on, but the classroom building remained an integral part of the center’s design as “Phase IV.” It was never constructed, however, due to lack of funding. Image 3

As the Olpin Union was nearing completion, the Campus Planning Committee contemplated the construction of a “campanile” (bell tower) in the open space just south of the new building. “The campus badly needs some symbol indicative of education that will complete the triangle within the city,” the committee observed in 1958, “i.e., the capitol dome represents State government, the temple, religion and perhaps a campanile to represent education, and which can be plainly seen just as the other two elements are.” Although the campanile was never built, the Social and Behavioral Sciences Building eventually served as the landmark envisioned by the committee. Image 4

The bookstore today occupies the same site that it occupied in the years following World War II. Busy as it is today, it was considered of secondary significance by university planners. More to the point, they felt that its location was better suited for “a heavy use faculty, administrative or academic use.” So they considered two primary alternatives: a new building north of the Union and a structure between the Union and Orson Spencer Hall, “designed as an underground facility, with the floor level approximately the same as the level of the major academic mall.” Due to funding limitations, however, neither was constructed.

As noted in the related article, the primary funder of Pioneer Memorial Theater, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, asked the architects to draw up plans for Pioneer Memorial Theater as a structure that replicated the Salt Lake Theater that had been located downtown for several decades. An early drawing shows this replica that was later dispensed with in favor of a more Modernist design that better accommodated the technical requirements of the theater. Image 5

There were other proposals—some conceptual, some refined—that would have significantly changed the character of campus:

  • Two campus planning maps from 1959 and 1960 showed the library as an octagon and a circle, respectively, rather than the square that exists today. As the design was finalized, administrators suggested etching inspirational quotations into the cast-stone panels that enclosed the library, an idea rejected by the architects.
  • Early site plans and renderings of the plaza to the east of the Social and Behavioral Sciences Building envisioned an elaborate fountain.
  • An architect’s rendering of the Eccles Health Sciences Library included an expansive plaza between the library to the east, the Medical Center to the north, and the College of Pharmacy to the south.
  • Options for the medical towers and townhouses south of the Medical Center included the use of Sunset Tower (recently completed at 40 South 900 East), as well as a much larger complex on the current site that would have incorporated a varying configuration of high rises and lower “garden type” apartments.
  • In the late 1960s, as the university sought to increase its supply of married student housing, planners considered developing over 200 units at the mouth of Red Butte Canyon.
  • A primary goal during the post-World War II era was to concentrate academic buildings near the center of campus. One concept considered for achieving this goal was to construct two 14-story structures—one for the Chemistry Department and one for the Physics Department. As one planner noted, however, “Shoehorning two such units into that restricted area would be most difficult, as well as visually unpleasant.”
  • Early renderings and models for the Medical Center, Special Events Center, College of Pharmacy, and Physics Building reflect significantly different design ideas than those that were actually constructed.

Humorous Quotes from Author’s Research Notes

  • “This will be a place where future wives will be trained on how to turn out the hash without burning it.” (W.J. O’Connor, chair of the Board of Regents, at the October 1951 groundbreaking for the Sterling Sill Home Living Center)
  • “At an earlier date, I received a memo from you posing the hazard that the rocks to the east of the Union Building and Orson Spencer Hall could be if we were to have a riot on campus.” (Memo from B. Blain Bradford to Bruce H. Jensen in July of 1970)
  • “Most people would agree that the fountain (Tanner Fountain across the plaza from the library) seems to be attracting the ‘undesirable’ hippie type clientele who are oftentimes quite dirty and unkempt.” (Memo from J Elroy Jones in July of 1970) Image 1
  • “Dean Hiner (College of Pharmacy) said his faculty could get along with anybody; however, if it (the site for the new College of Pharmacy building) went to the Medical Center he wanted it understood that his profession was a dignified profession and was not to be browbeaten by the Medics.” (Memo from Martin Brixen in March of 1958)
  • “Since the development of married student housing will cut out about four holes on the golf course, it was decided that detailed plans should be drawn up as quickly as possible in order that it could be explained to the Fort Douglas Club people.” (Minutes of the Planning Committee in August of 1956)
  • Avard Fairbanks first dean of the College of Fine Arts (reacting to the emergence of Modernist ideas on campus): “The corruption of art students’ principles stems from being exposed to foreign art manglers, the subversive doctrine of [-]isms, Communist-inspired and Communist-connected. These influences have one boasted goal: the destruction of our cultural tradition and priceless heritage.” (quoted in Anne Palmer Peterson. Years of Promise: The University of Utah’s A. Ray Olpin Era, 1946-1964. Salt Lake City, Utah: University of Utah Press, 2009.)
  • Orson Spencer Hole (Utah Daily Chronicle, April 17, 1956) Image 2

Photo Gallery

Image 1. Tanner Fountain. Courtesy of University of Utah Archives.

Image 2. From the Utah Daily Chronicle, April 17, 1956. Courtesy of Utah Digital Newspapers.

Image 3. This initial concept for the Merrill Engineering Center included a circular auditorium and six-story classroom building. Courtesy of University of Utah Marriott Library Special Collections.

 

 

Image 4. The original plans for the Union building included a “campanile” or bell tower in the area to the south of the building. Courtesy of University of Utah Archives.

Image 5. An early rendering of Pioneer Memorial Theater as a replica of the Salt Lake Theater. Courtesy of University of Utah Archives.

 

Board of State History

Meeting Agenda
Thursday, April 20, 2017, 12:00 – 3:00 pm
Senate Office Building, State Capitol Complex, Olmsted Room, Salt Lake City, UT

TIME:  Noon – working lunch for Board members, hosted by State History

12:15 p.m. – WELCOME – Dina Blaes, Chair

JANUARY – MARCH STATE HISTORY PROGRAM ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Brad Westwood (5 min
1. Natl. Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers and Rep. Rob Bishop
2. Central Utah Water Conservancy District’s “Water, Agriculture & Urban Growth” history

Roger Roper – Historic Preservation (5 min)
1. CLG grants awarded for 2017-18: 18 grants for a total of $175,000.
2. Hosting of Association for Preservation Technology (APT) regional conference.
3. State Tax Credit projects for 2016: final numbers and dollar amounts.
4. National Award given to SHPO by the Federal Aviation Administration.

Wendy Rex-Atzet – History Day (5 min)
1. 10 regional contests concluded March 25th. 1500 students participated.
2. State Contest Sat., April 29, Hillcrest Jr. High (Murray). 400 students expected; judged needed.
3. 6,500 student participation statewide 2016-17 (an increase of over 1,000).
4. National contest coming up June 11-15.
5. Teaching Utah history with primary sources.

Doug Misner – Library and Collections (5 min)
1. Completed Salt Lake Tribune Photo Negative Collection digitization project. Placed 171,000 new images online. (Total images now available over 250,000.)
2. Loaned USS Utah clock to the Lt. Governor’s office.
3. Completed inventory of loaned artifacts housed at the Governor’s Mansion.
4. With Dept. of Veterans & Military Affairs, created displays for two WWI-related events.
5. Completed contract for new collection mgmt. system. Goal: go live in July.

Chris Merritt or Arie Leeflang – Antiquities (5 min)
1. Hosted Biennial National Park Service Coordination Meeting.
2. GIS/Records staff created 3 maps for Maps on the Hill event at state capitol.
3. Organized annual Archaeological Consultants Meeting in Price.
4. Supported Archaeological Conservancy’s development of Smith Rock Art Preserve.

Jed Rogers, Holly George – Utah Historical Quarterly (5 min)
1. Entered into partnership with U of U’s Dept. of History and BYU’s Charles Redd Center.
2. Participated on WWI commemoration committee.
3. Edited Utah Humanities’ Smithsonian booklet accompanying exhibition The Way We Worked.
4. Assisted the K-12 Utah History Working Group.
5. Spring 2017 UHQ guest-edited themed issue on architecture.

Kevin Fayles – Communications (10 min)
1.Website & Social Media
2. Cemeteries and burials program. 1,327 burials added.  4,484 burials updated (662,461 total burials)
3. 2017 Events

ACTION ITEMS 

  1. Approval of the January 19 2017 Board of State History Meeting Minutes – Dina Blaes
    (Board motion required) (3 min)
  2. Proposed Awards Policy update – Jed Rogers (5 min)
  3. National Register of Historic Places Nominations – Cory Jensen (25 min)
    (Board motion required)
    National Register of Historic Places Nominations Summaries
    a) The Harold W. and Evelyn Burton House
    b) Granite Schools Campus
    c) The Johnson Ranch House
    d) The Robert Gardner, Jr House

DISCUSSION ITEMS

4. National Register Approval to Move for the Zion National Park monuments – Cory Jensen (3 min)
No motion required, for Board’s information

5. Committee reports – David Rich Lewis, David Richardson, Steve Olsen, Michael Homer (20 min)

6. Proposed Museum for History, Heritage and Arts update – Dina Blaes, Brad Westwood (10 min)

7. Legislative briefing – Roger Roper (5 min)

8. Negro Bill Canyon briefing – Arie Leeflang (5 min)

9. Metrics, KPI’s, monthly reports – Kevin Fayles (10 min)

10. State History Annual Conference – Brad Westwood, Dina Blaes (5 min)

TRAINING

Open and Public Meetings Act – Thom Roberts (10 min)

 OTHER BUSINESS

NEXT MEETING:  July 20, 2017, 12:00 pm – 3:00 pm, Utah State History, Board Room

ADJOURN

TOUR
Utah Drawn Map exhibit (1 hour)