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Category Archives: About History

Latinos in Utah

WE REMEMBER, WE CELEBRATE, WE BELIEVE                                         A PHOTO HISTORY OF LATINOS IN UTAH

Latinos in Utah
History of Mexico
Monticello Settlement
Miners of Utah
Railroad Workers in Utah
Religious Practices of Latinos in Utah
Migrant Workers in Utah
Utah Hispanics in the Military
Latinos’ Quest for Civil Rights in Utah
Our Future: Our Children

For twenty years, and in conjunction with our oral history project, we gathered an impressive number of pictures and documents of Latinos in the state of Utah. These pictures allowed us to recreate the history of Latinos since the time when the Aztecs and Utes inhabited Utah’s territory to our present days. Based on ethnic methodologies, I merged the history of the United States, the history of Utah, and the history of Mexican Americans in the Southwest.

Our main intention was to increase the level of awareness of the presence of Latinos in Utah, to promote tolerance and understanding in our communities, and to make this information accessible to people without formal education. For these purposes, we created a travel exhibit, with captions in English and Spanish, and with a feedback mechanism through which people provided further information. The exhibit was displayed throughout the state and about 120,000 people visited our photo-documentary.

This collection includes maps showing the territory of Utah when it was part of Mexico, the first community of Latinos in Monticello, the experience of the miners in Bingham and Price, the participation of Latinos in the construction of Utah’s railroad, the presence of Mexican migrant workers, the Latinos of Utah who enrolled in the U.S. wars abroad, the early religious organizations of Catholics and Latter Day Saints, the Chicano Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s and 1970s, and Utah’s Latino leaders who have left a legacy for future generations.

Organizations such as the Utah State Historical Society, the Center of Documentary Art, the American West Center, the Salt Lake Tribune, the Special Collections at the University of Utah, Utah Humanities, Ethnic Studies, Centro Civico Mexicano, Weber State University, the Office of Hispanic Affairs, and multiple families contributed to this project. We are confident that our involvement will enhance the goals of making Utah’s history a more wholistic and inclusive endeavor.

Armando Solorzano. Ph.D.

 

 

This was an excerpt of the panels. You can access the finding aide here.

NHPA 50 Year Anniversary

Join the nationwide celebration for the 50th Anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) in 2016. This Act transformed the face of communities throughout the United States and Utah by establishing a framework and incentives to preserve historic buildings, landscapes, and archaeological sites.  Coordinated through Preservation50.org, the nationwide celebration is designed to inform and engage all ages and backgrounds in this significant law’s effects on local communities and history. Since 1966, the NHPA has shaped preservation efforts on America’s history and culture while generating positive social and economic impacts. In 2015, the Utah State Historic Preservation Office (formed in 1973) gathered stakeholders to organize a year of events and to gather engaging stories and media for the celebration.

This website is a portal to a year of events and activities that cover all corners of Utah.

Events Calendar     Media     Preservation Apps     Links     Partners

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Shipwreck at the Great Salt Lake

 

Utah Drawn: An Exhibition of Rare Maps

We are pleased to announce an exhibition of forty rare historical maps depicting the region that became Utah from its earliest imaginings by European cartographers to the modern state’s boundaries.

Original maps shown are from the private collection of Salt Lake City businessman Stephen Boulay, with additional contributions from the Utah State Historical Society, LDS Church History Department, L. Tom Perry Special Collections at Brigham Young University, Special Collections at the J. Willard Marriott Library, and the American West Center at the University of Utah.

The exhibition is curated by Travis Ross and Stephen Boulay. Exhibition designer is Kerry Shaw. See here for other contributors and exhibition partners.

The exhibition will run through late summer 2017.

For an online interactive map detailing the shifting political and cultural boundaries of Utah, see Contested Boundaries: Creating Utah’s State Lines.


UHQ Digital Exhibition

The six maps reproduced below are part of Utah Drawn: An Exhibition of Rare Maps displayed in the Utah Capitol Building fourth floor beginning January 27, 2017.

Maps serve many purposes. They represent physical geographies, recording landmarks, routes, and boundaries. But they also reflect varying perceptions, imaginations, values, and aspirations. This is certainly true of the maps presented here. Over five centuries, empires and explorers along with printers and publishers worked first to trace the outline of a continent that was new to Europeans and then, eventually, to fill in its vast middle. These maps show the steady increase of geographic knowledge of the Americas, but they also demonstrate the economic and political interests that produced that knowledge and the individuals who benefited from it. They hint at what map makers and their sponsors determined was worth documenting, identifying, and, in some cases, possessing. They often erase, obscure, and distort. Put simply: maps are more than cartographic representations of known or imagined physical features on the landscape. As you examine these maps, try to determine the purposes for which they were made and any mistruths, omissions, and distortions they may contain.


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Title: America Septentrionalis

Creator: Jan Jansson (1588-1664)

Published in: Nouveau Theatre du Monde ou Nouvel Atlas

Place: Amsterdam

Date: 1641

This striking hand-colored map by the Dutch cartographer Jan Jansson (1588-1664) was the first atlas map to treat North America on its own page, separate from the rest of the western hemisphere. Jansson produced this definitive synthesis of the best cartographic knowledge then available. In the process, he helped to canonize both true and false details about North America’s geography for generations. This was not the first map to depict California as an island, for instance, but its widespread distribution helped to popularize that misconception. The eastern seaboard illustrates the French presence along the St. Lawrence River, the English in New England and Virginia, and the Dutch in what is labeled “Novum Belgium.” Though the lake feeding the Rio Del Norte might look familiar to modern Utahns, the Great Salt Lake did not enter the written record until the Timpanogos Utes related its existence to the Dominguez-Escalanté Expedition of 1776.


 

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Title: “Plano Geografico de los Descumbimientos”

Creator: Bernardo de Miera y Pacheco (1713-1785)

Manuscript (Original at Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University)

Date: 1778 (Facsimile, 1970)

Bernardo de Miera y Pacheco (1713-1785) traveled with the Dominguez-Escalante Expedition of 1776-1777 and drew this map as a record of the journey. The party served the Spanish interest in establishing an overland route connecting Mexico to Alta California, which remained an overseas colony of New Spain in spite of its relative geographic proximity well into the next century. In this map, Miera depicted the Rio Colorado with new clarity. This map depicted “Laguna de los Timpanogos” (Utah Lake) for the first time. It also illustrates the “Great River of the West,” a mythical river that tantalized those hoping to find a water passage to Asia for nearly two hundred years. Contrary to later maps, this conflation of Utah’s modern Green River and Sevier River terminated in a lake within the Great Basin. Miera named it Laguna de Miera after himself, but modern Utahns will know it as Sevier Lake.


 

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Title: “Partie du Mexique”

Creator: Philippe Vandermaelen (1795-1869)

Published in: Atlas Universel de Géographie Physique, Politique, Statistique Et Minéralogique

Date: 1827

Drawn by the Belgian cartographer Philippe Marie Vandermaelen (1795-1869), this map depicted the region from Lake Timpanogos (Utah Lake) to present day Colorado and Wyoming. It appeared in Vandermaelen’s six-volume Atlas Universel, published in 1827. As the first atlas to depict the entire globe with a large, consistent scale (26 miles to the inch), the individual maps in this atlas could be combined on a globe approximately 7.75 meters in diameter. The Princeton University Library’s has rendered the resulting globe digitally. The fourth volume focused on North America, he illustrated the Trans-Mississippi West in about twenty sheets.


 

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Title: “Neueste Karte von Mexico … 1850”

Creator: Carl Christian Franz Radefeld (1788-1874)

Published in: Joseph Meyer (1796-1856), Grosser Hand-Atlas

Place: Hildburghausen

Date: 1850

Even if the U.S. government never recognized the expansive state of Deseret, the prolific mapmakers at Meyer’s publishing company Bibliographisches Institut in Hildburghausen, Germany did, if only briefly. Like Young’s map of Deseret in Mitchell’s Universal Atlas, Meyer’s Grosser Hand-Atlas published a rare map of Deseret as originally proposed. That was not a coincidence. Meyer and his cartographer Radefeld relied on Mitchell’s atlas to produce their 1850-1854 editions of the Hand-Atlas.


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Title: “Map of the United States of America”

Creator: James H. Young (1792-18??)

Published in: Samuel Augustus Mitchell (1792-1868), A New Universal Atlas

Place: Philadelphia

Date: 1850

Fueled by emerging mass-market interest, atlases experienced a resurgence in popularity in the 1840s and 1850s. Produced for S. Augustus Mitchell’s contribution to that market by his longtime engraver and associate James H. Young, this map captured the territorial expansion of the newly-continental United States in progress. While the eastern United States might look relatively familiar—save the lack of West Virginia as a distinct state—the western territories bear only a vague similarity to the familiar state boundaries that would eventually settle. This map captured an already-reduced Utah Territory that stretched from roughly the Sierra Nevada range to the continental divide.

Note that the map erroneously called that territory by its then-defunct name of Deseret. This particular mid-1850 edition of the atlas had two U.S. maps, with each identifying the new territory by its alternate names. The United States never recognized an entity called “Deseret.” Western political events moved rather quickly at times, so it is understandable that a map prepared in early 1850 and published at the end of the year would not be able to keep up. Nonetheless, the territory which should have been labeled Utah Territory never looked like this.


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Title: “California, Oregon, Washington, Utah, New Mexico”

Creator: Samuel Augustus Mitchell (1792-1868)

Published in: A New Universal Atlas

Publisher: Charles Desilver

Place: Philadelphia

Date: 1857

Selling atlases in the mass market was a race as often as it was a contest over accuracy and comprehensiveness. Produced rapidly for Mitchell’s Atlas Universal in 1850 by adding new boundaries to an existing base map from the previous decade, this was one of the first maps to show the new state of California. It had little else going for it. Its intellectual debt to the 1840s meant that Frémont practically authored the Great Basin. The map even identified it as the Fremont Basin to at least the 1855 edition. Over the 1850s, Mitchell updated the map, adding in subsequent editions the cities and counties that had been conspicuously absent in the rushed earlier versions.

 


 

 

 

2017 Utah State History Conference

Local Matters

October 10–11, 2017

In 2017, we’re focusing on Local Matters—and local can be broadly defined.

Our annual conference will examine the many strands that create the fabric of communities, such as festivals, buildings, schools, or the arts.

We’ll also discuss the uses of local history and the application of sophisticated methodology to personal, family, and community history.

Workshops will focus on strategies for local organizations, oral history, historic preservation, and community histories.

CONFERENCE SCHEDULE OVERVIEW

Tuesday, October 10th
9:00 am–5:00 pm
Workshops
Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City

Wednesday, October 11th
8:00 am–5:00 pm
Plenary, lunchtime keynote and awards presentation, history and panel sessions
Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 West 3100 South, West Valley

*A detailed schedule will be posted in July

The Utah State Historical Society invites the public, scholars, students, policymakers, and organizations to submit proposals for papers, panels, or multimedia presentations on the theme Local Matters. This is both a call for papers and a call for the participation of community organizations such as museums, preservation groups, and historical societies.

Utah History Day On The Hill

On Friday, January 27, thirty middle- and high-school students from Logan, Price, Layton, Salt Lake, Alpine, Orem, Beaver, and Montezuma Creek will be the featured guests at Utah History Day on the Hill. The Division of State History is thrilled to host these exceptional young people, who are participants in Utah’s National History Day program.

These youth have done extensive historical research on important topics, presenting their work in the form of exhibits, documentaries, performances, websites, or papers. They were members of Utah’s National History Day delegation this past June, traveling to Washington, D.C., to compete in this prestigious academic event.

Projects on display at the Capitol will include:

St. Eustatius: The Exploration, Encounter, and Exchange that Won the Revolution, by Jacob Simmons, Albion Middle School

Long Walk of the Navajo: The 1864 Encounter at Hwéeldi and its Impacts on Dinétah,
by Kami Atcitty, Kaia Jay, and Esperanza Lee, Albert R. Lyman Middle School

George Catlin’s Native American Encounters: A Gift of Artistic Preservation, by Maren Burgess –8th Place, Senior Individual Exhibit, National History Day 2016

The Greatest Treasure Hunt in History, by Saige Hinds, Eliza Lewis, and Daniela Meneses

The Rebirth of Literature: Shakespeare’s Encounter, Exploration, and Exchange of Ideas, by Tessa Atwood, Katie Snow, Mercedez Clifford, Zoey Kourianos, Tyler Pierce, Carbon High School

Helen Foster Snow: American Journalist in the Chinese Revolution, by Daniel Nelson and Spencer Standing, Lakeridge Junior High. 5th Place, Junior Individual Website, National History Day 2016

Interagency Task Force

harvest_timeSince the late 1980’s, the Utah State Historic Preservation Office, housed within the Utah Division of State History (UDSH), has organized and convened the “Interagency Task Force” (ITF). Since its inception, the mission, direction, and membership have fluctuated, but the main goal remains consistent: to convene preservation and archaeological professionals from State and federal agencies, and others, to join in an informal dialogue about current issues in Utah.

Loosely organized with no formal bylaws, the Interagency Task Force promotes cooperation, data sharing, and professional discussion of topics relevant to both archaeologists and preservationists of the built environment. Recent topics in the ITF have included modifying the archaeological site form for Utah, emergency preparedness and resource sharing between agencies, archaeological site stewardship programs,  sharing ideas for improving tribal consultation from the agencies, dissemination of changes to policy and guidance, state permitting and licensing, data sharing agreements, and current plans for increasing community preservation efforts.

Participants in the ITF are fluid but usually include architectural historians, archaeologists, program leads, and others from federal agencies such as the Bureau of Land Management, US Forest Service, National Park Service, Bureau of Reclamation, Natural Resources Conservation Service, Army Corps of Engineers, US Air Force, US Army mixed with state agency leads from State Trust Lands, Wildlife Resources, National Guard, State Parks, Oil, Gas, and Mining, Utah Department of Transportation, among others. Recently, the ITF expanded to include an archaeologist from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which has recently become deeply engaged in Section 106 consultation efforts as a consulting party.

With no formal bylaws, meeting minutes, or decision points, the ITF has been an effective and easily organized means of promoting inter-agency cooperation on a host of projects well beyond the three-hour meeting every quarter. Improved communication, resource sharing, and a sense of a growing and interlinked community are among the many benefits of the ITF.

Utah on the National Register

NRHPBook_Page_01The National Register of Historic Places only exists because of its association with the federal National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), and it is turning 50 years old in 2016.

This book is a small selection of Utah’s contribution to historic preservation work.

2016 State History Conference Sessions

Missed out on the 2016 State History Conference “Rural Utah, Western Issues”? Below are some select sessions that were recorded.

Historical Perspectives on the Public Lands Debate in the American West

  • Leisl Carr Childers is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Northern Iowa where she coordinates the Public History program and teaches the American West.
  • Joseph E. Taylor III is a professor of history at Simon Fraser University. He has written broadly about gentrification and the struggles to control access to natural resources. He is currently mapping the history of transfer payments to western counties for activities occurring on federal lands.

Early Rural Utah in the Uinta Basin

  • Lee Kreutzer (chair)
  • Elizabeth Hora-Cook: Public Spaces and Private Places: The Construction of Social Landscapes in Jones Hole Canyon, Utah
  • Judson Byrd Finley: The Fremont Archaeology of Dinosaur National Monument: Fifty Years after Breternitz

Industrial and Natural Landscapes

  • Nelson Knight (chair)
  • Mark Karpinski: Utah Coal Company Towns: Rural Towns Created to Fuel Western Urbanization
  • Susie Petheram: The Jordan River Then and Now: From Rural Resource to Urban Resource
  • Jessica F. Montcalm: Echoes from the Camp: Sego as a Case Study in Identifying and Industrial Landscape

New Methods, Historical Innovation

  • Gregory C. Thompson (chair)
  • Justin Sorensen: Exploring Utah’s Nuclear History through the Downwinders of Utah Archive
  • Cami Ann Dilg: The past that was differs little from the past that was not”: Pictographs and Petroglyphs in Cormac McCarthy’s Blood Meridian or the Evening Redness in the West
  • Kenneth P. Cannon: Across the Desert: The Archaeology of the Chinese Railroad Workers, Box Elder County, Utah

The Personal and the Political

  • Colleen Whitley (chair)
  • Devan Jensen and Kenneth L. Alford: Cynthia Park Stowell: Wife of a Utah War POW
  • Walter R. Jones: A Tragic Set of Events in Early-Twentieth-Century Rural Uinta County, Wyoming
  • Kenneth L. Cannon II: Frank Cannon, the Salt Lake Tribune, and the Alta Club

Voices from the Desert: Rural Issues in Southeastern Utah

  • Panel: Robert S. McPherson (moderator and panelist), Winston Hurst, Rick Eldredge, Mike Noel

Participants will address the loss and acquisition of land by Native Americans; the use and abuse of Ancestral Puebloan sites and artifacts; the multifaceted issues of law enforcement in a complex, disputed environment; and the impact of the Grand-Staircase Monument on residents twenty years after its inception. Moving from past to present, panelists will share views on how history has shaped contemporary issues.

World War I in Rural Utah

  • Robert S. Voyles (chair)
  • Kerry William Bate: Kanarraville Women Fight World War I
  • Robert S. McPherson: Native American Reaction to World War I
  • Allan Kent Powell: World War I in Castle Valley: The Impact of the War on Carbon and Emery Counties

Board of State History Retreat Agenda

Board of State History Retreat
Thursday, October 27, 2016

9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Thomas S. Monson Center (formerly the Enos Wall Mansion)
411 East S. Temple, Salt Lake City

9:00 a.m.                     WELCOME – Dina Blaes, Board Chair

9:15 a.m.                     Quarterly program accomplishments – staff

9:45 a.m.                     Refining Board Committees & the Committee- to-Board process – Brad Westwood

10:00 a.m.                   Break into Committees:

  • Utah State Historical Society Committee (Chair: David Rich Lewis)
  • Major Planning, Gifts & Awards Committee (Chair: Mike Homer)
  • Historic Preservation & Archaeology Committee (Chair: David Richardson)
  • Library, Collections & Digitization (Chair: Steve Olsen)

11:15 a.m.                   BREAK

11:30 a.m.                   Group photo

11:35 a.m.                   LUNCH/DISCUSSION/ACTION ITEMS

12:30 p.m.                   ACTION ITEMS

  • Delisting of National Register of Historic Places buildings – Cory Jensen
    Demolished buildings: (no vote required)
    – Thomas Cunningham House (NRIS #84002250), Park City, Summit County
    – Downing Apartments (NRIS #87002160), Ogden, Weber County
    – Lehi Commercial & Savings Bank (NRIS #98001537), Lehi, Utah County
    – Morgan Elementary School (NRIS #86000737), Morgan, Morgan County
    – North Ogden Elementary School (NRIS #85000822), North Ogden, Weber County
    – Plant Auto Company Building (NRIS #04001129), Richmond, Cache County
    – Rose Apartments (NRIS #87002160), Ogden, Weber County
    – Sidney Stevens House (NRIS #77001326), Ogden, Weber County
    Loss of integrity: (vote required)
    – Hyrum Stake Tithing Office (NRIS ##85000251), Hyrum, Cache County
  • Approval of 2017 Board meeting dates  Alycia Aldrich
    January 19th, April 20th, July 20th, October 26th

1:20 p.m.                     BREAK

1:30 p.m.                     TRAINING

  • Board Duties, Bylaws and Statutory AuthorityThom Roberts
  • National Park Service Walk Through Historic Buildings – Dina Blaes/Cory Jensen

2:30 p.m.                     DISCUSSION ITEMS

  • Proposed Utah History, Heritage and Arts Museum – Dina Blaes
  • Closing remarks –  Brad Westwood

3:00 p.m.                     ADJOURN

2016 State History Conference Schedule

Online registration is now closed.  Walk in registrations will be accepted as space allows. 

Friday, Sept. 30th, 2016
Utah Cultural Celebration Center

Printable conference program

**Conference At A Glance

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Plenary Session (Great Hall)

Panel: Gregory Smoak (moderator), Leisl Carr Childers, and Jay Taylor

Historical Perspectives on the Public Lands Debate in the American West

Leisl Carr Childers photoLeisl Carr Childers is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Northern Iowa where she coordinates the Public History program and teaches the American West. She earned her doctorate at the University of Nevada Las Vegas, where she worked as the Assistant Director of the Nevada Test Site Oral History Project. She garnered several awards for her research on the Great Basin, including UNLV’s prestigious President’s Fellowship, UNI’s Faculty Summer Fellowship, and the Charles Redd Center for Western Studies Summer and Publication Awards. Her experiences collecting oral histories from those who worked at the test site or were affected by nuclear testing in addition to her own recreational activities on public lands provided the foundation for her project. Her first book, The Size of the Risk: Histories of Multiple Use in the Great Basin, received a Spur Award from the Western Writers of America and has garnered praise from reviewers in journals diverse as Montana The Magazine of Western History and the American Historical Review.

Jay Taylor photoJoseph E. Taylor III is a professor of history at Simon Fraser University. He has written broadly about gentrification and the struggles to control access to natural resources, including Making Salmon, about the fisheries crisis in the Pacific Northwest, and Pilgrims of the Vertical, about the cultural and environmental stakes of modern rock climbing. His current research focuses on the legislative history of Progressive Era and New Deal conservation, and he is mapping the history of transfer payments to western counties for activities occurring on federal lands.


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World War I in Rural Utah (Room 101 and 102)

  • Robert S. Voyles (chair)
  • Kerry William Bate: Kanarraville Women Fight World War I
  • Robert S. McPherson: Native American Reaction to World War I
  • Allan Kent Powell: World War I in Castle Valley: The Impact of the War on Carbon and Emery Counties

Early Rural Utah in the Uinta Basin (Room 104)

  • Lee Kreutzer (chair)
  • Elizabeth Hora-Cook: Public Spaces and Private Places: The Construction of Social Landscapes in Jones Hole Canyon, Utah
  • Judson Byrd Finley: The Fremont Archaeology of Dinosaur National Monument: Fifty Years after Breternitz

Evaluating The Awkward State of Utah (Great Hall East)

  • Panel: Brad Westwood (moderator), Jay H. Buckley, Brian Q. Cannon, Matthew Godfrey, Lisa Olsen Tait, John Sillito

Accessing Statewide Heritage Resources (Room105)

  • Panel: Roger Roper (moderator), Jennifer Ortiz, Megan Van Frank, Janell Tuttle, Ray Matthews

Representatives from several agencies and organizations will describe the programs (including grants) they have for assisting communities with history-related projects.

Bringing the Art of Decorative Paper Cutting into the Twenty-first Century (Board Room)

  • Susannah Nilsson, Cindy Bean

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Lunch Program

12:10 p.m. Welcome
Dina Blaes, Chair, Board of State History

12:15 p.m. Update on Division of State History
Brad Westwood, Director, Division of State History

12:20 p.m. 2016 Annual Utah State History Awards
Dina Blaes, Chair, Board of State History

12:35 p.m. Introduction of Dr. Patty Limerick
Dina Blaes, Chair, Board of State History

12:40 p.m. Keynote

Quicksand, Cactus, and the Power of History in Polarized Times:

Bringing Juanita Brooks and Dale L. Morgan Back into Our Conversation

Dr. Patty Limerick, Faculty Director and Chair of the Board of the Center of the American West

As chroniclers tracking the journeys of human beings through the terrain of time, today’s historians stand in an unsettled relationship with their own predecessors and forebears. It is not uncommon for historians to treat the work of the historical writers of the past as outmoded and irrelevant, even as they lament the public’s failure to pay proper respect to the importance of the past! And yet, as this talk will reveal, intense feelings and attitudes—impatience to inspiration, vexation to affectionswirl and surge just beneath the surface of one of the world’s dreariest terms:  “the historiography of the American West.” Seizing the welcome opportunity to speak at the Utah State History Conference in 2016, Patty Limerick will explore the examples set by Utah historians, Juanita Brooks and Dale L. Morgan. How can the work, conduct, and character of those two close friends guide us today in the strenuous work of applying historical perspective to the dilemmas of the contemporary West? Leaving a legacy of guidance for her successors in Western American history, Juanita Brooks recorded the advice that her cowboy father gave her:

I’ve learned that if I ride in the herd, I am lost—totally helpless. One who rides counter to [the herd] is trampled and killed. One who only trails behind means little, because he leaves all responsibility to others. It is the cowboy who rides the edge of the herd, who sings and calls and makes himself heard who helps direct the course. . . . So don’t lose yourself, and don’t ride away and desert the outfit. Ride the edge of the herd and be alert, but know your directions, and call out loud and clear. Chances are, you won’t make any difference, but on the other hand, you just might.

It may not be an everyday custom for Western American historians to embrace a life lesson offered by Western American cowboys, but on September 30, 2016, Patty Limerick will give this a try.

 

Patty Limerick is the Faculty Director and Chair of the Board of the Center of the American West at the University of Colorado, where she is also a Professor of History. Limerick received her Ph.D. in American Studies from Yale University in Yale University in 1980, and from 1980 to 1984 she was an Assistant Professor of History at Harvard. In 1985 she published Desert Passages, followed in 1987 by her best-known work, The Legacy of Conquest, an overview and reinterpretation of Western American history that has stirred up a great deal of both academic and public debate. In 2012 she published A Ditch in Time: The City, the West, and Water, a history of water in Denver. Limerick is also a prolific essayist.

Limerick has received a number of awards and honors recognizing the impact of her scholarship and her commitment to teaching, including the MacArthur Fellowship (1995 to 2000) and the Hazel Barnes Prize, the University of Colorado’s highest award for teaching and research (2001). She has chaired the 2011 Pulitzer jury in History.

Limerick has served as President of the Organization of American Historians, American Studies Association, the Western History Association, and the Society of American Historians, and as the Vice President of the Teaching Division of the American Historical Association. She is currently the President of the Organization of American Historians.

In 1986, Limerick co-founded the Center of the American West, and since 1995 it has been her primary point of affiliation. During her tenure, the Center has published a number of books, including the influential Atlas of the New West (1997), and a series of lively, balanced, and to-the-point reports on compelling Western issues.

The Center of the American West serves as a forum committed to the civil, respectful, problem-solving exploration of important, often contentious, public issues.


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What Role Do Historians Play in Public Land and Water Policy? (Rooms 101 & 102)

  • Panel: Patty Limerick, Joseph E. Taylor III, Leisl Carr Childers, and Jedediah Rogers (moderator)

The conference theme provides a forum for historians and scholars to apply their methodology and discipline to questions that have contemporary—and, frequently, political—resonance. But what role, precisely, does the historian play in contributing to sensitive, political issues over public lands, water, and environmental conflict? The discussion will focus not so much on public lands and water as on the boundaries, limitations, and strengths of the discipline of history to pressing contemporary western issues.

New Methods, Historical Innovation (Room 104)

  • Gregory C. Thompson (chair)
  • Justin Sorensen: Exploring Utah’s Nuclear History through the Downwinders of Utah Archive
  • Cami Ann Dilg: The past that was differs little from the past that was not”: Pictographs and Petroglyphs in Cormac McCarthy’s Blood Meridian or the Evening Redness in the West
  • Kenneth P. Cannon: Across the Desert: The Archaeology of the Chinese Railroad Workers, Box Elder County, Utah

Evolving Small Towns (Room 105)

  • Dina Blaes (chair)
  • Linda Thatcher: J. C. Penney Stores and How They Changed Rural Main Streets in Utah
  • Michael Hansen: Plat for the City of Zion: Past, Present, and Future
  • Shannon Ellsworth: Handcarts, Homesteads, and Hipsters: What Millennials Have in Common with Mormon Pioneers

The Personal and the Political (Great Hall – west)

  • Colleen Whitley (chair)
  • Devan Jensen and Kenneth L. Alford: Cynthia Park Stowell: Wife of a Utah War POW
  • Walter R. Jones: A Tragic Set of Events in Early-Twentieth-Century Rural Uinta County, Wyoming
  • Kenneth L. Cannon II: Frank Cannon, the Salt Lake Tribune, and the Alta Club

Lark, Utah: A Public History Event (Great Hall – east)

  • Chris Merritt, Utah State History, Antiquities Section
  • Dr. Ted Moore, Salt Lake Community College
  • Jessica Montcalm, Division of Oil, Gas, and Mining
  • Steve Richarson and Ren Willie, Lark Residents
  • Betsey Welland, Marriott Library, University of Utah
  • Margaret Benson, Marriott Library

In 1978, retirees, immigrants, mine workers, and others were displaced from their homes at Lark by mine expansion. Over the last three years, archaeologists and historians with the Utah Division of State History, Salt Lake Community College, University of Utah, and Utah State University have worked with former Lark residents, or their descendants, to tell their story again. Session will include formal presentations on the town’s history.  In the Board Room, an oral history booth, a document scanning table and more will be available.

Lark Oral Histories (Board Room)


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Rural Utah, National Destinations: Developing Utah’s National Parks (Rooms 101 & 102)

  • Leighton M. Quarles (chair and moderator)
  • Susan Rhoades Neel: National Park Expansion in Utah during the New Deal
  • Paula Mitchell: The Grand Circle Tour: Early Tourism in Zion, Bryce, North Rim, and Cedar Breaks
  • Michael Shamo: Creating Canyonlands: Southeastern Utah’s Bid to Benefit from Federal Lands

This hybrid paper session/panel discussion explores the dynamics of national park development in Utah with an emphasis on interaction with and impact on surrounding communities. Following the presentations a brief panel discussion will address the ongoing relevance of these overlapping histories.

Voices from the Desert: Rural Issues in Southeastern Utah (Room 104)

  • Panel: Robert S. McPherson (moderator and panelist), Winston Hurst, Rick Eldredge, Mike Noel

Participants will address the loss and acquisition of land by Native Americans; the use and abuse of Ancestral Puebloan sites and artifacts; the multifaceted issues of law enforcement in a complex, disputed environment; and the impact of the Grand-Staircase Monument on residents twenty years after its inception. Moving from past to present, panelists will share views on how history has shaped contemporary issues.

Land Stewardship in Northern Utah (Room 105)

  • Dave Whittekiend (chair)
  • Charles Condrat: Watersheds and Historic Properties: Environmental Rehabilitation and Resulting Affects to Historic Character
  • Carol Majeske: Collaborative Efforts and Successful Reforestation, a History of the Salt Lake Forest Reserve
  • Rachelle Handley: The Legacy of Recreation and Historic Buildings: Preservation and Adaptive Re-Use on the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest
  • Scott Bushman: John Fell Squires and the Creation of the Logan Forest Reserve

Industrial and Natural Landscapes (Great Hall – west)

  • Nelson Knight (chair)
  • Mark Karpinski: Utah Coal Company Towns: Rural Towns Created to Fuel Western Urbanization
  • Susie Petheram: The Jordan River Then and Now: From Rural Resource to Urban Resource
  • Jessica F. Montcalm: Echoes from the Camp: Sego as a Case Study in Identifying an Industrial Landscape

Lark, Utah: A Public History Event (continued) (Great Hall – east)

In 1978, retirees, immigrants, mine workers, and others were displaced from their homes at Lark by mine expansion. Over the last three years, archaeologists and historians with the Utah Division of State History, Salt Lake Community College, University of Utah, and Utah State University have worked with former Lark residents, or their descendants, to tell their story again. Session will include formal presentations on the town’s history, an oral history booth, a document scanning table and more.

Lark Oral Histories (continued) (Board Room)

Thank you to our conference sponsors:

American Institute of Architects (Utah chapter), American Planning Association (Utah chapter), American West Center (U of U), Ames Construction, Charles Redd Center for Western Studies (BYU), Chevron, Fort Douglas Military Museum, Governor’s Office of Economic Development, J. Willard Marriott Library (U of U), LDS Church History Department, National Park Service, Resonance Printing Solutions, U of U History Department, USU History Department, Utah Cultural Celebration Center, Utah Humanities, Utah Westerners.

Online registration is now closed. Walk in registrations will be accepted as space allows.