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66th Annual Utah History Conference

Transportation and Movement

September 27–28, 2018

It’s possible to read Utah history as a story of movement and transportation. The centrality of movement to exploration, industry, and travel—major themes in Utah history—is obvious. Less so is the way movement can be seen on a more conceptual level as a way to evaluate change over space and time: the variation and transformation of the landscape, the flow of ideas and people into and out of the state, the mobility of groups and individuals, the development of transportation-related infrastructure, and the transportation and communication networks connecting the state to regional and national systems.

The flow of ideas and people is now more global than ever before, rendering traditional boundaries that confined physical movement less operable.

This is both a call for papers and a call for community recognition of the centrality of transportation and movement to Utah and the western region. We invite the public, scholars, students, policymakers, and organizations to submit proposals for papers, panels, or multimedia presentations on this theme.

Call for Papers

The Utah Historical State Society, thanks to our generous sponsors, offers the conference free to scholars, writers, educators, students, and the general public. Registration is required.


CONFERENCE SCHEDULE OVERVIEW

Thursday, September 27 
8:30 am–5:00 pm
Workshops
Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City
State Archives Building, 346 South Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City

Friday, September 28 
7:45 am – check in and morning refreshment
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Plenary, lunchtime keynote and awards presentation, history and panel sessions
Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 West 3100 South, West Valley



DETAILED CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

Thursday, September 27 – TBA

Friday, September 28 – TBA


Schedule at a Glance – TBA

 

Utah State History Conference Podcast


2017 State History Conference “Local Matters”

Listen to select sessions from the 2017 State History Conference

 

 

 


2016 State History Conference “Rural Utah, Western Issues”

Listen to select sessions from the 2016 State History Conference

 

 

 


2015 State History Conference “Deep Roots: Many Voices

Listen to select sessions from the 2015 State History Conference

USS Utah

The USS Utah During World War I and World War II

On December 7, 2017, the bell was placed on permanent display in the University of Utah’s Naval Science Building.

Background of the USS Utah

President Theodore Roosevelt and Secretary of the Navy William H. Moody proposed naming a battleship for the state of Utah on their visit in 1903. The proposal became reality when Congress authorized its construction on May 13, 1908.

Built by the New York Ship Building Company and launched on December 23, 1909, the USS Utah was sponsored by Alice Spry, daughter of Governor William Spry.

Commissioned in August 1911, the USS Utah joined the Atlantic Fleet in 1912 after Captain William S. Benson led this ship through its shakedown cruise.

In 1914 the Utah participated in action at Vera Cruz during the Mexican Revolution. She assisted in the transport of refugees to Tampico, Mexico and sent a landing force to occupy Vera Cruz, Mexico to prevent weapons and ammunition from being delivered to General Huerta.

After the United States entered World War I, the USS Utah was stationed at Bantry Bay, Ireland and served as the flagship for Admiral Thomas S. Rodgers, Commander of Battleship Division 6. Her main responsibility during the war’s final months was to protect supply convoys. She ended her service in Europe by joining the honor escort carrying President Woodrow Wilson to France.

After the London Naval Treaty of 1930, the USS Utah was redesignated as a “miscellaneous auxiliary ship.” She now served as a remote controlled target ship to train anti-aircraft gunners. She effectively filled this role for the Navy from 1931 to 1941.

On December 7, 1941, the USS Utah was moored on the northwest side of Ford Island opposite Battleship Row. In the first minutes of the Pearl Harbor attack, the Utah was struck by at least two torpedoes and began listing heavily to port. The order was given to abandon ship and by 0812 the ship had rolled over and sunk. Six officers and fifty two enlisted men were killed, including Chief Petty Officer Peter Tomich, who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions that day.

After the attack, the Utah was partially turned “… inshore to clear the approach to an adjacent pier.” The Navy began to assess the damage to determine if she could be repaired and if salvage operations could begin. On September 5, 1944 she was declared “out of commission, not in service” and was struck from the Navy’s list of ships on November 13, 1944.

How Did the Ship’s Bell from the USS Utah End-Up at the University of Utah?

The ship’s bell from the USS Utah was originally presented by the United States Navy to the Utah State Historical Society in April 1961. Transfer of the bell was arranged through the office of Senator Wallace F. Bennett and was given to the Historical Society on an indefinite loan basis. For almost six years the bell was housed at the Historical Society’s offices in the Kearns Mansion on South Temple.

Discussions began in 1965 to loan the bell to a new Naval History Museum that was to be located in the Naval Science Building on the University of Utah campus. The museum was to be an affiliate of the Utah State Museum of Natural History. In January 1965, the Board of Trustees of the State Historical Society passed a resolution supporting the creation of the museum.  Everett L. Cooley, Director of the Utah State Historical Society and Major Gaut, curator of the Naval History Museum, began communicating to arrange the loan of the ship’s bell and other items from the Historical Society’s collection. The bell was to be loaned to the museum with the condition that the Historical Society could ask for its return if in the future a new Utah State History Museum was established. The bell was transferred in February 1966 with the intention of either displaying it inside the Naval Science Building or on an appropriate foundation outside the building.

Pearl Harbor’s Forgotten Hero: The Story of the USS Utah

1961 Press Release from Senator Wallace F. Bennett

1961 Press Release from the Clearfield, Utah Naval Supply Depot

USS Utah The Utah Daily Chronicle Feb. 10, 1966

USS Utah Salt Lake Tribune April 11, 1961

2017 State History Conference Sessions

If you missed our 2017 history conference “Local Matters,” you can listen to selected sessions, the plenary presentation, and the keynote address.

Plenary Session — Peril, Conflict, and Storytelling in Community History

  • David Rich Lewis (moderator), Utah State University emeritus
  • Elizabeth Clement, Department of History, University of Utah
  • Gregory Smoak, American West Center, University of Utah
  • Benjamin Pykles, LDS Church History Department

Keynote I’m Not a Historian, But I Played One on TV
Ken Verdoia: Through a forty-five year career in broadcast journalism, Ken Verdoia chronicled many individuals, episodes, and eras that shaped Utah, the region, and the nation.

Cache Valley Utah Drug Court Oral History Project: A Community-Driven Effort

  • Randy Williams (moderator), Fife Folkfore Archives, Utah State University
  • Jennifer Duncan, Special Collections and Archives, Utah State University
  • Thomas L. Wilmore, Utah First District Court
  • Andrew Dupree, Drug Court Graduate and Community Scholar

The Impact of Independent Film on Local Communities

The panel will discuss the many facets of documentary filmmaking, film exhibition, economics and the impact documentary film has on local communities.

  • Doug Fabrizio or Elaine Clarke (moderator), KUER, RadioWest
  • Patrick Hubley, Program Director, Utah Film Center
  • Virginia Pearce, Director, Utah Film Commission
  • Local Filmmakers: Tyler Measom, Film: Sons of Perdition; Jenny MacKenzie and Jorden Saxton Hackney, Jennie MacKenzie Films, Film: Dying In Vein

Interpreting Controversy: Preserving and Presenting the Story of Joe Hill

A panel highlighting the story of Joe Hill, discussing the value of preserving the original records that help tell the Joe Hill story, and explaining how teachers make use of primary sources to instruct students on controversial and difficult histories.

  • Jeremy Harmon, Salt Lake Tribune
  • Jim Kichas, Utah State Archives
  • Quinn Rollins, Granite School District

Trail of the West

Free Film Series: Classic Hollywood Cinema and the Imagination of the American West

The Utah State Historical Society, Ms. Naoma Tate, Buffalo Bill Center of the West, and others invite you to celebrate the spirit of the American West through art, movies and events.

The films will be shown on third Thursdays at 7:00 p.m., January – June 2018, at the Fort Douglas Post Theater (245 S Fort Douglas Blvd). See a list of all screenings.

  • January 18, 2018Buffalo Bill (1944)
  • February 15, 2018Ramona (1928)
  • March 15, 2018Ramrod (1947)
  • April 19, 2018Wagon Master (1950)
  • May 17, 2018Brigham Young (1940)
  • June 21, 2018Westward the Women (1951)

The series focuses on Utah’s storied landscapes and how classic Hollywood films used them to create an ideal, imagined American West. Dr. James V. D’Arc, a retired BYU motion picture curator and professor of film, will offer a brief lecture before each screening and lead a post-viewing discussion.

At the Buffalo Bill Center of the West, you’ll find activities from December 2017 to June 2018. Read a booklet of all events.

As part of this effort, join us for Screening Utah, a free, public film series done in partnership with the Buffalo Bill Center of the West.

 

Parking Instructions: Please park behind the Ft. Douglas Post Theater (taking Ft. Douglas Blvd.). Parking lot 84 is the closest, but lots 77, 78 ,79 are also available. Parking is free at the University after 6:00 p.m. See the map to the left.

2017 Utah State History Conference

Local Matters:
Interweaving historical threads of community

October 10–11, 2017

In 2017, we’re focusing on Local Matters—and local can be broadly defined.

Our annual conference will examine the many strands that create the fabric of communities, such as festivals, buildings, schools, or the arts.

We’ll also discuss the uses of local history and the application of sophisticated methodology to personal, family, and community history.

Workshops will focus on strategies for local organizations, oral history, historic preservation, and community histories.

Registration is now closed

Walk-ins will be accepted as space allows.  We may not be able to accommodate lunch for walk-ins. 


CONFERENCE SCHEDULE OVERVIEW

Tuesday, October 10th
8:30 am–5:00 pm
Workshops
Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City
State Archives Building, 346 South Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City

Wednesday, October 11th
7:45 am – check in and morning refreshment
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Plenary, lunchtime keynote and awards presentation, history and panel sessions
Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 West 3100 South, West Valley



DETAILED CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

Tuesday, October 10th
8:30 am–4:00 pm
Workshops
Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City
State Archives Building, 346 South Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City

Introduction to Oral History (WORKSHOP IS FULL)
Megan van Frank and Jedediah Rogers
9 am–noon, Tuesday, October 10, 2017
Zephyr Room, Rio Grande Depot
300 S. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City

Oral history is a powerful tool for people to understand their family stories and community history. Whether used for scholarly research, finding community stories, or fleshing out one’s family history, oral history provides unusual access to stories not otherwise known or in danger of being lost. This workshop will provide a focused introduction to the art and craft of oral history: to the philosophical underpinnings of the discipline—what it can, and cannot, tell us about the past—and to the nuts and bolts of executing successful oral history projects. An orientation to the Utah Humanities and Utah Division of State History joint oral history program will also be provided.

Megan van Frank directs community history and museums programming for Utah Humanities.

Jedediah Rogers is a Senior State Historian at the Utah Division of State History and co-managing editor of the Utah Historical Quarterly.

**

Community Preservation (WORKSHOP IS FULL)
Presented by SHPO staff at Division of State History
8:30 am–noon, Tuesday, October 10, 2017
Archives Training Room, State Archives Building
346 S. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City

This workshop will provide the tools and techniques for running successful local historic preservation programs, including incentives, guidelines and regulations, planning tools, partnerships, public education, and grants and tax credits. Find out whether your community is taking advantage of all resources available to it.

**

Family History Meets History (WORKSHOP IS FULL)
Holly George and Beth Taylor, CGsm
1:00 – 3:30 pm, Tuesday, October 10, 2017
Zephyr Room, Rio Grande Depot
300 S. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City

The world of family history has much to offer—both tools and stories—to the writers of history. At the same time, historical writing and genealogical work are not always the same thing.

This workshop will address
1) How to use the tools of family history research in historical writing
2) How to craft family stories into articles for journals such as Utah Historical Quarterly

Holly George, Utah Historical Quarterly.

Beth Taylor, FamilySearch International

**

National Historic Trails and the BLM: How Historic Trails Can Connect the Public to the Past (WORKSHOP IS FULL)
Rob Sweeten
1:00–2:30 pm, Tuesday, October 10, 2017
Archives Training Room, State Archives Building
346 S. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City

Rob Sweeten is BLM National Trail Administrator for the Old Spanish National Historic Trail and Historic Trails lead for BLM-Utah.

**

BLM-Utah’s Cultural Resource Program: Organization, Goals, and Highlights (WORKSHOP IS FULL)
Nate Thomas
3:00–4:00 pm, Tuesday, October 10, 2017
Archives Training Room, State Archives Building
346 S. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City

Nate Thomas is State Archaeologist and Cultural Resource Program Lead for BLM-Utah



Wednesday, October 11th

8:00 am check in and morning refreshments
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Plenary, lunchtime keynote and awards presentation, history and panel sessions
Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 West 3100 South, West Valley

Schedule at a Glance

Room 201 & 202 Room 204 Room 205 Great Hall – West Great Hall – East
9:00-10:15am
Great Hall 1
Plenary Session — Peril, Conflict, and Storytelling in Community History
Speakers: David Rich Lewis (moderator), Elizabeth Clement, Gregory Smoak, and Benjamin Pykles
10:30-11:45am Familiar Places: Glimpses of Home and Community National Institutions, Local Crises Territorial History and Its Records Cooperation and the Preservation of Historic Places Writing Regional History: Gary Topping’s Utah Historians and the Reconstruction of Western History
Noon-1:30pm
Great Hall 1
Lunch (free for registered attendees)

Keynote
Ken Verdoia
I’m not a Historian, But I Played One On TV

2017 Outstanding Achievement Awards Program
Dina Blaes, Chair, Board of State History

1:45-3:00pm Food and Culture: Daily Life in Northern Utah

 

Pedagogy in the Digital Era Historic Preservation in Salt Lake City Knowledge is Power: Education in Utah History of the Southern Paiute Tribe Restoration Act
3:15-4:30pm Cache Valley Utah Drug Court Oral History Project: A Community-Driven Effort Religion and the Community The Impact of Independent Film on Local Communities Interpreting Controversy: Preserving and Presenting the Story of Joe Hill Understanding 20th-Century Utah: James Allen’s Still the Right Place: Utah’s Second Half-Century of Statehood, 1945-1995

 


Click here for detailed session and speaker information

Registration is now closed

Walk-ins will be accepted as space allows.  We may not be able to accommodate lunch for walk-ins. 

Thank you to our generous conference sponsors!

    
    
    

Tschanz Rare Books, LLC

Detailed History Sessions “Local Matters”

Registration is now closed

Walk-ins will be accepted as space allows. We may not be able to accommodate lunch for walk-ins.

10/11/2017 Utah Cultural Celebration Center
Time Session Titles and Speakers
10:30 – 11:45am Familiar Places: Glimpses of Home and Community

Chair: Laurie Bryant, Utah Division of State History

Alan B. Barnett
There’s No Place Like Home: Named Houses in Utah

Bruce W. Worthen
Voices from a Distant Town: Community Formation in the Remote Settlements of Antebellum Utah

Clint Pumphrey
Daggett County at 100: New Approaches to a Colorful Past

National Institutions, Local Crises

Chair: Greg Davis, Department of Heritage and Arts

J. Scott Bushman
A History of Fighting Forest Fires in Northern Utah:  Local Initiatives that Contributed to National Solutions

Joseph F. Darowski
Struggling with the Three Rs: Relief, Recovery, and Reform in Utah during the Great Depression (1930–1940)

Ben Kiser
When the Army Came to Town:  WWII, the Cold War, and the Aftermath in Tooele County

  Territorial History and Its Records

Chair: Colleen Whitley

Kenneth Alford
Utah and the American Civil War: The Written Record

Richard Quartaroli
John Wesley Powell’s Explorations and Surveying of the Colorado River and Its Tributaries, 1871–1872, with the Assistance of Mormon Communities

  Cooperation and the Preservation of Historic Places

Chair: Gay Cookson, Department of Heritage and Arts

Adriane Herrick Juarez
Honoring the Past, Moving into the Future: The Renovation of the Historic Park City Library

Lisa Michele Church
The Page Ranch Story: Preserving a Local Treasure

Leighton M. Quarles
The Fort Douglas Heritage Commons: A Model of Public-Private Cooperation in Historic Preservation

Writing Regional History: Gary Topping’s Utah Historians and the Reconstruction of Western History

Gary Topping, Polly Aird, Richard Saunders, Gary Bergera, Jedediah Rogers (moderator)

Noon – 1:30pm Lunch

2017 Outstanding Achievement Awards Program
Dina Blaes, Chair Board of State History

Keynote
Ken Verdoia
I’m Not A Historian, But I Played One on TV

1:45 – 3:00pm Food and Culture: Daily Life in Northern Utah

Chair: Melissa Coy, Utah Division of State History

Darcy Pumphrey
Brigham Young College: A Case Study in LDS Education at the Turn of the Twentieth Century

Cody Patton
Beehive Brews: The Surprising Story of Beer in Utah

Lisa Barr
Local Food Producers of Cache Valley, Utah

Pedagogy in the Digital Era

Chair: Wendy Rex-Atzet, Utah Division of State History

Hadyn B. Call
The Driven 2 Teach Program: A History

Brenden Rensink, Brent Rogers, Jay H. Buckley                                                   Making Local History Digital: Intermountain Histories

Historic Preservation in Salt Lake City

Chair: Susan Rugh, Brigham Young University

William G. Hartley
One Salt Lake Landmark Saved, One Left to Disintegrate:  Nicholas G. Morgan and Architect Edward O. Anderson’s Crusade to Save the Old City Hall and Turn Pioneer Park into a Jewel

Walter Jones
Salt Lake City’s Magnificent Knutsford Hotel

Nan Weber and Allen Roberts
The Salt Lake City Building Legacy of Master Architect Richard K. A. Kletting

  Knowledge is Power: Education in Utah

Chair: Kerri Nakamura, Department of Heritage and Arts

Mervin Brewer
Echoes from the Chalkboard: Public School Buildings of the Past

Mark W. Buchanan
“School in the Other Fellows Town Seven Miles Distant”: Cache County School Consolidation, 1908

Brett D. Dowdle
“Putting Our Clutches to His Very Throat”: The Reconstruction of Education in Utah, 1867–1890

History of the Southern Paiute Tribe Restoration Act

Larry Echohawk, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; Travis Parashonts, Paiute Tribe; Dorena Martineau, Paiute Tribe; Mary Sloan (moderator), attorney

3:15 – 4:30pm Cache Valley Utah Drug Court Oral History Project: A Community-Driven Effort

Randy Williams (moderator), Jennifer Duncan, Thomas L. Willmore, Brock Alder

Religion and the Community

Chair: Nelson Knight, Department of Heritage and Arts

Alan J. Clark
“I’m Going Through”: Bringing Pentecostal Christianity to Utah

Jeffery O. Johnson
“Shaking the Tree”: The Impact of Signature Books on the Mormon Community

Jessica Nelson
Mormonism and the Negro, African Americans, and LDS Racism at Utah State University, 1960–1961

The Impact of Independent Film on Local Communities
Doug Fabrizio or Elaine Clarke (moderator), KUER, RadioWest
Patrick Hubley, Program Director, Utah Film Center
Virgina Pearce, Director, Utah Film Commission
Local Filmmakers: Tyler Measom, Film: Sons of Perdition, Jenny MacKenzie and Jorden Saxton Hackney, Jennie MacKenzie Films, Film: Dying In Vein

Interpreting Controversy: Preserving and Presenting the Story of Joe Hill

Jeremy Harmon; Jim Kichas; Quinn Rollins

Understanding 20th-Century Utah: James Allen’s Still the Right Place: Utah’s Second Half-Century of Statehood, 1945-1995

James Allen; Thomas Alexander; Brian Cannon; Michael Homer; Eric Swedin; Brad Westwood (moderator)

Registration is now closed

Walk-ins will be accepted as space allows.  We may not be able to accommodate lunch for walk-ins. 

NHPA 50 Year Anniversary

Join the nationwide celebration for the 50th Anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) in 2016. This Act transformed the face of communities throughout the United States and Utah by establishing a framework and incentives to preserve historic buildings, landscapes, and archaeological sites.  Coordinated through Preservation50.org, the nationwide celebration is designed to inform and engage all ages and backgrounds in this significant law’s effects on local communities and history. Since 1966, the NHPA has shaped preservation efforts on America’s history and culture while generating positive social and economic impacts. In 2015, the Utah State Historic Preservation Office (formed in 1973) gathered stakeholders to organize a year of events and to gather engaging stories and media for the celebration.

This website is a portal to a year of events and activities that cover all corners of Utah.

Events Calendar     Media     Preservation Apps     Links     Partners

shipwreckgsl

Shipwreck at the Great Salt Lake