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Category Archives: Annual Conference

Utah History Conference Program

Conference Program “Transportation and Movement”

Please register. Walk-ins will be accepted as space allows, but we may not be able to accommodate lunch.

9/28/2018 Utah Cultural Celebration Center
Time Session Titles and Speakers
10:30 – 11:45am Photography, Representation, and the Transcontinental Railroad

Chair and comment, TBA

Daniel Davis: A. J. Russell’s Transcontinental Railroad Photographs in Echo and Weber Canyons

Zane Rand Hirschi-Neckel: Andrew J. Russell’s Photography and the Rise of Transcontinental America

James Swensen: Utah’s Gateway: Echo Canyon and the Changing Nature of the Sublime

Utah Studies Lightning Round

This session serves as an opportunity for students and new scholars to briefly describe their research and gain feedback and insight on the process.

Presenters: Jon England; TBA

Comments: Eric Swedin, Rebecca Andersen, TBA

  The Role of Transit in Salt Lake City’s Development

Chair and comment, TBA

Susie Petheram: Two Rails, Two Transit-Oriented Developments

Laurie Bryant: In the Path of Progress

Brent D. Barnett: Where Have All of the Interesting Churches Gone? The Early 20th-Century Meetinghouses of Salt Lake Valley

Edwin W. Senior: Discovering “West-of-Jordan” Developments, 1868–1941

  Transportation Technology and Tourism

Clint Pumphrey, chair and comment

Ryan K. Lee: “This is the Place … to Visit”: Railroads and the Beginnings of the Utah’s Tourism Industry

John H. Clark: Automotive Firsts in Utah

Susan S. Rugh, Lisa-Michele Church: Highways and Roadside Culture in 20th-Century Utah

Premiere: Journey to Promontory (2018)

This session will be the Utah premiere of a new PBS documentary film, made by longtime history documentarian Richard Luckin, on the building of the transcontinental railroad. Luckin will be in attendance to offer comment.

Noon – 1:30pm Lunch 2018 Outstanding Achievement Awards Program
Dina Blaes, Chair Board of State HistoryKeynote
David Haward Bain
Building the Transcontinental Railroad
1:45 – 3:00pm Refugee Movement and Boundaries: Displacement, Relocation, and Advocacy

Randy Williams, Nelda Ault-Dyslin, Chit Moe, Jess Lucero

Pathfinding: Transportation Solutions

Chair and comment, TBA

Luli Josephson: “The Little Tramway that Could”: An Obscure Mode of Transportation in Early Utah

David M. Wilkins: Swing and Sway the Electric Way: Utah’s Interurban Railways

Rhonda Lauritzen: Way Stations to Airports: One Family’s Mark on Transportation, 1867–1947

Moving Goods and Money

Chair and comment, TBA

R. Devan Jensen: Mail before the Rail: Rise and Demise of the Brigham Young Express and Carrying Company

Eileen Hallet Stone: F. Auerbach & Bros.: The Movement of Goods and Ideas in a Utah Dynasty

Matthew C. Godfrey: The Bishop and the People: Charles W. Nibley, Charles G. Patterson, and the Proper Role of Business and Competition in Progressive Era Utah

  Culture and Technology

Chair and comment, TBA

Berwyn J. Andrus: The Monumental Highway—Bluff to Little Zion and the Arrowhead Trail, 1917: The Saga of Dolph Andrus, Doc Hopkins, and the Maxwell Automobile

Hikmet Sidney Loe: The Transient West: Transportation and Movement as Gleaned from a Close Reading of Robert Smithson’s Earthwork, Spiral Jetty (1970)

Kellan Hatch: Have Drone, Will Travel: Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for Digital Preservation of Utah’s Cultural Resources

Promontory (2002)

This session will screen the 2002 KUED public television film on the completion of the transcontinental railroad, with comments from panelists, the director, and others, regarding how this documentary, produced for the 2002 Olympics in Salt Lake City, holds up sixteen years later.

Kelly Nelson (Woosh Productions), Laura Durham and Mary Dickson (KUED), Ken Verdoia (Film Producer)

3:15 – 4:30pm Murder and Justice: Stories of True Crime

Chair and comment, TBA

Kenneth L. Cannon II: Murder in Forest Dale: Issues in the Murder of Jimmy Hay and the Trial of Peter Mortensen

Linda Thatcher: Lester Farnsworth Wire: Inventor of the Traffic Light

Rebecca A. Wiederhold: Pardon for Murder: Jared Dalton, the “Assassin of Old Mother Parker”

“All Out for Uncle Sam”: Movement in Northern Utah during WWII

Anya Kitterman, Sarah Singh, Alyssa Chaffee, Michael Balliff, Lorrie Rands

Book Panel: Leonard Arrington Diaries

This panel is part of a regular series evaluating significant books in Utah history. The editor will be on hand to offer comment.

Gary James Bergera, John Sillito, TBA, Jedediah Rogers (moderator)

Cultural Threads in 19th-Century Utah

Holly George, chair and comment

Robin Scott Jensen: The 1869 Textual Culture of Polygamy

Kenneth L. Alford: Poetry and Songs of the Utah War

Laraine Miner: Mormon Pioneer Dances, Crossing the Plains to Utah, and Colonizing the West

Note that following her presentation, dance scholar Laraine Miner and the Eagle Mountain Family Dance Group and Band will perform authentic ca. 1860s group dancing–dated from the transcontinental railroad era–on the 1st floor plaza.

Youth and Film

TBA

Please register. Walk-ins will be accepted as space allows.  We may not be able to accommodate lunch for walk-ins. 

 

 

 

66th Annual Utah History Conference

Call for Papers

Transportation and Movement

History Sessions to be held on September 28, 2018

It’s possible to read Utah history as a story of movement and transportation. The centrality of movement to exploration, industry, and travel—major themes in Utah history—is obvious. Less so is the way movement can be seen on a more conceptual level as a way to evaluate change over space and time: the variation and transformation of the landscape, the flow of ideas and people into and out of the state, the mobility of groups and individuals, the development of transportation-related infrastructure, and the transportation and communication networks connecting the state to regional and national systems. The flow of ideas and people is now more global than ever before, rendering traditional boundaries that confined physical movement less operable.

The 66th Annual Utah History Conference will take a deep dive into the themes of transportation and movement. This theme will include the study and commemoration of America’s first transcontinental railroad completed and joined at Promontory, Utah Territory, on May 10, 1869. We invite the public, scholars, students, policymakers, and organizations to submit proposals for papers, panels, or multimedia presentations on this theme. This is both a call for papers and a call for community recognition of the centrality of transportation and movement to Utah and the western region.

Submissions on other aspects of Utah history will also be considered. We welcome a range of formats, from the traditional panels and sessions to more innovative formats. We encourage full session or panel submissions, though we will make every effort to match single paper proposals with other panels and papers.

Each proposal must include:

  • Each paper proposal, whether individual or in a session, should include a 500-word abstract detailing the presentation, its association if any with the theme, and its topic’s significance. Submissions for entire sessions or panels should include a session title and a 500-word session abstract that outlines the purpose of the session, along with a confirmed chair and/or commentator, if applicable.
  • Brief bio (50-word limit) and accompanying c.v. with address, phone, and email for each participant
  • Audio-visual requirements
  • Your permission, if selected, for media interviews, session audio/visual recordings, and electronic sessions or podcasts during or in advance of the conference. The Historical Society will use these recording in its effort to meet its history-related mission.

We will accept submissions January 1, 2018, to April 13, 2018.

Click here to submit a individual paper proposal

Click here to submit a panel or multiple presenter session proposal

Please direct questions regarding submissions to Dr. George or Dr. Rogers at uhq@utah.gov.

For general conference information, please contact Alycia Rowley at 801-245-7226 or aaldrich@utah.gov.

2018 Utah State History Conference home page

2018 Outstanding Achievement Awards

Nominations are now being accepted

The Utah Division of State History’s annual awards recognize individuals and groups who have made a significant contribution to history, prehistory or historic preservation in the state of Utah. Whether these efforts on behalf of the past are quiet or prominent, they benefit the state’s citizens in tangible and intangible ways. Utah State History therefore invites nominations of persons or organizations who have given extraordinary service or completed outstanding projects in the field of Utah archaeology, preservation or history, or in support of one of Utah’s heritage organizations. This project or activity may include research, preservation, education, fundraising, community programs, volunteerism, journalism or other activities.

All projects must be completed within the past two years prior to nomination. Organizational nominations should include description of organization, mission, and programs. Documentation must accompany the form and should include a minimum of two letters of support, photos of project, exhibits, or visual arts, or copies of articles, books, videos, or scripts.

Nominations will be accepted until June 15, 2018.

Awards will be presented at the 66th Annual Utah State History Conference, “Transportation and Movement” on September 28, 2018 at the Utah Cultural Celebration Center.

Submit an Outstanding Achievement Award nomination

2018 Utah State History Conference home page

Call for Papers

This is both a call for papers and a call for community recognition of the centrality of transportation and movement to Utah and the western region. We invite the public, scholars, students, policymakers, and organizations to submit proposals for papers, panels, or multimedia presentations on this theme.

For additional information, please email lbuckmiller@utah.gov or call (801) 245-7231

66th Annual Utah History Conference

Transportation and Movement

September 27 – 29, 2018

It’s possible to read Utah history as a story of movement and transportation. The centrality of movement to exploration, industry, and travel—major themes in Utah history—is obvious. Less so is the way movement can be seen on a more conceptual level as a way to evaluate change over space and time: the variation and transformation of the landscape, the flow of ideas and people into and out of the state, the mobility of groups and individuals, the development of transportation-related infrastructure, and the transportation and communication networks connecting the state to regional and national systems.

The flow of ideas and people is now more global than ever before, rendering traditional boundaries that confined physical movement less operable.

The Utah Historical State Society, thanks to our generous sponsors, offers the conference free to scholars, writers, educators, students, and the general public. Registration is required.

Register to Attend! 


CONFERENCE SCHEDULE OVERVIEW

Thursday, September 27 
8:30 am–5:00 pm
Workshops
Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City
State Archives Building, 346 South Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City

Friday, September 28 
7:45 am – check in and morning refreshment
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Plenary, lunchtime keynote and awards presentation, history and panel sessions
Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 West 3100 South, West Valley

We are pleased to announce David Haward Bain, author of “Empire Express: Building the First Transcontinental Railroad,” will provide the conference keynote address. Bain is the author of dozens of books and articles.

Empire Express is an epic narrative history covering not only the dramatic struggle to link the oceans with twin bands of iron but three decades in which America doubled in size, fought three wars, and discovered itself. A main selection of the Book of the Month Club and a selection of the History Book Club, Empire Express was a finalist both for the Los Angeles Times Book Award in History and the Francis Parkman Prize, and won the New England Historical Association’s and the National Railroad and Locomotive Historical Society’s annual book prizes; the author was elected a Fellow in the Society of American Historians. The work was featured on Brian Lamb’s C-SPAN show, “Booknotes” and adapted by PBS “The American Experience” into a 2-hour documentary. See http://www.davidhbain.com/

Plenary
Is Utah Still the Crossroads of the West?

The panel will examine the notion in all its dimensions—in terms of the state’s geographic position but also cultural and economic influence—and whether the idea of crossroads is still a useful and accurate concept to think about Utah history and the state in the twenty-first century.

Panelist are David Haward Bain, John M. Findlay, Pam Perlich, and Fred E. Woods; moderated by Jeffrey D. Nichols

Saturday, September 29th
Pony Express in Utah Tour
Transcontinental Railroad Tour



DETAILED CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

Thursday, September 27
Workshops

Using Volunteers to Expand Your Reach
Mary Buehler and Jacob Johnson
9:00 am – 3:30 pm (45 min break for lunch – on your own)
Zephyr Conference Room, Rio Grande Depot
300 S. Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City, UT

Have you thought about using volunteers in your work? Wondering what the first steps are to setting up a volunteer program? During this session, UServeUtah will use real-world examples and international best practice research to help you decide if volunteers are right for you. We will walk you through the first steps in deciding how volunteers can help your program and what you need in order to manage them. Come prepared with you questions!

Utah Geographic Names: how geographic names in Utah are proposed, managed, and officially reviewed
Arie Leeflang
9:00 am – 10:30 am
West Lecture Room, Rio Grande Depot

The names associated with natural geographic features often carry significant history, character, and meaning for the nearby communities or local cultural groups. Since 1890 and 1978 respectively, the U.S Board on Geographic Names and the Utah Committee on Geographic Names have been reviewing proposed geographic names in an effort to standardize naming efforts. This workshop will address how geographic names are proposed and reviewed – including the various national policies the state Committee and national Board follow. Resources on researching geographic names will be also covered. Finally, current trends and topics in geographic names, including the recent Grandstaff Canyon proposal, will be reviewed.

Family History Meets History
Holly George
1:00 pm – 3:30 pm
Board Room, Rio Grande Depot
300 S. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City

The world of family history has much to offer—both tools and stories—to the writers of history. At the same time, historical writing and genealogical work are not always the same thing.

This workshop will address
1) How to use the tools of family history research in historical writing
2) How to craft family stories into articles for journals such as Utah Historical Quarterly

Utah History in 3D: The Use of 21st Century Technologies in Archaeology
Shawn Lambert
1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
West Lecture Room, Rio Grande Depot
300 S. Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City

When people think of archaeology, they mainly think of excavations and artifact recovery. There is another facet of archaeology that involves photogrammetry and 3D printing technologies. In this workshop, you will receive an introduction to photogrammetry and 3D printing and their applications in archaeology and public outreach.

Friday, September 28

7:45 am – 9:00 am:  Check in and morning refreshments
9:00 am – 10:15 am: Opening Plenary
History Session 1:  10:30 am – 11:45 am
12:00 pm – 1:30 pm:  Lunchtime Keynote Speech by David Haward Bain, author of “Empire Express: Building the First Transcontinental Railroad” and Outstanding Achievement Awards Program, by Dina Blaes, Chair, Board of State History
History Session 2:  1:45 pm – 3:00 pm
History Session 3:  3:15 pm – 4:30 pm

Detailed Conference Program

Schedule at a Glance

Room 201 & 202 Room 204 Room 205 Great Hall Suite C
9:00-10:15am
Great Hall 1
Plenary Session — Is Utah Still the Crossroads of the West?
Speakers: Jeffrey D. Nichols (moderator), David Haward Bain, John M. Findlay, Juliette Tennert, Fred E. Woods

The panel will examine the question in all its dimensions—in terms of the state’s geographic position but also cultural and economic influence—and whether the idea of crossroads is still a useful and accurate concept to think about Utah history and the state in the twenty-first century.

10:30-11:45am Photography, Representation, and the Transcontinental Railroad Utah Studies Lightning Round The Role of Transit in Salt Lake City’s Development Transportation, Technology, and Tourism Premiere: Journey to Promontory
Noon-1:30pm
Great Hall 1
Lunch (free for registered attendees)

Keynote
David Haward Bain
Building the Transcontinental Railroad

David Haward Bain, author of Empire Express: Building the First Transcontinental Railroad, will offer the keynote address. Empire Express is an epic narrative history covering not only the dramatic struggle to link the oceans with twin bands of iron but three decades in which America doubled in size, fought three wars, and discovered itself.

2018 Outstanding Achievement Awards Program
Dina Blaes, Chair, Board of State History

1:45-3:00pm Refugee Movement and Boundaries: Displacement, Relocation, and Advocacy

 

Pathfinding: Transportation Solutions Moving Goods and Money Culture and Technology Promontory (2002)
3:15-4:30pm Murder and Justice: Stories of True Crime “All Out for Uncle Sam”: Movement in Northern Utah during WWII Book Panel: Leonard Arrington Diaries, edited by Gary James Bergera Cultural Threads in 19th-Century Utah Youth and Film

 

Detailed session information

Saturday, September 29th

Pony Express in Utah Tour
Time: 8am to 6pm

Description:  To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the National Trails System Act, the Bureau of Land Management’s Salt Lake field office is offering an auto tour of the Pony Express National Historic Trail on National Trails Day, Saturday, September 29. During the tour, which will take place from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., BLM staff and Utah historians will guide participants across a landscape largely untouched since the trail’s creation in 1860.

The tour will begin at the Home Depot parking lot located at 222 E. 2400 North, Tooele, and return to the Wasatch Front via I-80. Numerous stops will allow participants to visit Pony Express Station ruins and view traces of the trails.

Limitations: Sign-up is limited to the first 15 cars. Backcountry travel will be on a gravel road; a well-maintained vehicle with good tires and a spare is necessary. Participants should be ready for variable weather and terrain, and include plenty of water, good sturdy shoes, a hat (for sun or shine) and other outdoor clothing! For more details contact BLM outdoor recreation planner Ray Kelsey by phone at 801-977-4300 or email at rkelsey@blm.gov.

Transcontinental Railroad Tour
Time: 800am to 600pm

Description: As we quickly approach the 150th Anniversary of the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad in 2019, the Bureau of Land Management would like to invite the public to join cultural resource staff and historians on a guided tour of some important locations in western Box Elder County. Tour will stop at the important railroad towns of Kelton and Terrace, along with some important engineering feats such as the Dove Creek Fill and Peplin Cut.

Tour will begin at the Love’s Travel Station at Snowville, Utah (just off I-15) at 800am, and will return to this location at the end of the day (around 6pm).

Limitation: Sign-up is limited to the first 10 cars. Backcountry travel will be on the historic transcontinental railroad grade, so there is a risk of flat tires from railroad spikes. Good off-road tires, medium to high-clearance vehicle and a spare is required. You are responsible for your own lunch and water. Participants should be ready for variable weather and terrain, and include plenty of water, good sturdy shoes, a hat (for sun or shine) and other outdoor clothing! For more details contact BLM archaeologist Michael Sheehan by phone at 801-977-4300 or email at msheehan@blm.gov.


2018 Outstanding Achievement Awards – Nominations are Now Being Accepted

The Utah Division of State History’s annual awards recognize individuals and groups who have made a significant contribution to history, prehistory or historic preservation in the state of Utah. Whether these efforts on behalf of the past are quiet or prominent, they benefit the state’s citizens in tangible and intangible ways. Utah State History therefore invites nominations of persons or organizations who have given extraordinary service or completed outstanding projects in the field of Utah archaeology, preservation or history, or in support of one of Utah’s heritage organizations. This project or activity may include research, preservation, education, fundraising, community programs, volunteerism, journalism or other activities.


Thank you to our generous conference sponsors!

    
                    
    
    

Register to Attend! 

For general conference, award nominations, or session proposals questions, please contact Alycia Rowley at aaldrich@utah.gov or 801-245-7226

Utah State History Conference Podcast


2017 State History Conference “Local Matters”

Listen to select sessions from the 2017 State History Conference

 

 

 


2016 State History Conference “Rural Utah, Western Issues”

Listen to select sessions from the 2016 State History Conference

 

 

 


2015 State History Conference “Deep Roots: Many Voices

Listen to select sessions from the 2015 State History Conference

2017 State History Conference Sessions

If you missed our 2017 history conference “Local Matters,” you can listen to selected sessions, the plenary presentation, and the keynote address.

Plenary Session — Peril, Conflict, and Storytelling in Community History

  • David Rich Lewis (moderator), Utah State University emeritus
  • Elizabeth Clement, Department of History, University of Utah
  • Gregory Smoak, American West Center, University of Utah
  • Benjamin Pykles, LDS Church History Department

Keynote I’m Not a Historian, But I Played One on TV
Ken Verdoia: Through a forty-five year career in broadcast journalism, Ken Verdoia chronicled many individuals, episodes, and eras that shaped Utah, the region, and the nation.

Cache Valley Utah Drug Court Oral History Project: A Community-Driven Effort

  • Randy Williams (moderator), Fife Folkfore Archives, Utah State University
  • Jennifer Duncan, Special Collections and Archives, Utah State University
  • Thomas L. Wilmore, Utah First District Court
  • Andrew Dupree, Drug Court Graduate and Community Scholar

The Impact of Independent Film on Local Communities

The panel will discuss the many facets of documentary filmmaking, film exhibition, economics and the impact documentary film has on local communities.

  • Doug Fabrizio or Elaine Clarke (moderator), KUER, RadioWest
  • Patrick Hubley, Program Director, Utah Film Center
  • Virginia Pearce, Director, Utah Film Commission
  • Local Filmmakers: Tyler Measom, Film: Sons of Perdition; Jenny MacKenzie and Jorden Saxton Hackney, Jennie MacKenzie Films, Film: Dying In Vein

Interpreting Controversy: Preserving and Presenting the Story of Joe Hill

A panel highlighting the story of Joe Hill, discussing the value of preserving the original records that help tell the Joe Hill story, and explaining how teachers make use of primary sources to instruct students on controversial and difficult histories.

  • Jeremy Harmon, Salt Lake Tribune
  • Jim Kichas, Utah State Archives
  • Quinn Rollins, Granite School District

2017 Utah State History Conference

Local Matters:
Interweaving historical threads of community

October 10–11, 2017

In 2017, we’re focusing on Local Matters—and local can be broadly defined.

Our annual conference will examine the many strands that create the fabric of communities, such as festivals, buildings, schools, or the arts.

We’ll also discuss the uses of local history and the application of sophisticated methodology to personal, family, and community history.

Workshops will focus on strategies for local organizations, oral history, historic preservation, and community histories.

Registration is now closed

Walk-ins will be accepted as space allows.  We may not be able to accommodate lunch for walk-ins. 


CONFERENCE SCHEDULE OVERVIEW

Tuesday, October 10th
8:30 am–5:00 pm
Workshops
Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City
State Archives Building, 346 South Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City

Wednesday, October 11th
7:45 am – check in and morning refreshment
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Plenary, lunchtime keynote and awards presentation, history and panel sessions
Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 West 3100 South, West Valley



DETAILED CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

Tuesday, October 10th
8:30 am–4:00 pm
Workshops
Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City
State Archives Building, 346 South Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City

Introduction to Oral History (WORKSHOP IS FULL)
Megan van Frank and Jedediah Rogers
9 am–noon, Tuesday, October 10, 2017
Zephyr Room, Rio Grande Depot
300 S. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City

Oral history is a powerful tool for people to understand their family stories and community history. Whether used for scholarly research, finding community stories, or fleshing out one’s family history, oral history provides unusual access to stories not otherwise known or in danger of being lost. This workshop will provide a focused introduction to the art and craft of oral history: to the philosophical underpinnings of the discipline—what it can, and cannot, tell us about the past—and to the nuts and bolts of executing successful oral history projects. An orientation to the Utah Humanities and Utah Division of State History joint oral history program will also be provided.

Megan van Frank directs community history and museums programming for Utah Humanities.

Jedediah Rogers is a Senior State Historian at the Utah Division of State History and co-managing editor of the Utah Historical Quarterly.

**

Community Preservation (WORKSHOP IS FULL)
Presented by SHPO staff at Division of State History
8:30 am–noon, Tuesday, October 10, 2017
Archives Training Room, State Archives Building
346 S. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City

This workshop will provide the tools and techniques for running successful local historic preservation programs, including incentives, guidelines and regulations, planning tools, partnerships, public education, and grants and tax credits. Find out whether your community is taking advantage of all resources available to it.

**

Family History Meets History (WORKSHOP IS FULL)
Holly George and Beth Taylor, CGsm
1:00 – 3:30 pm, Tuesday, October 10, 2017
Zephyr Room, Rio Grande Depot
300 S. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City

The world of family history has much to offer—both tools and stories—to the writers of history. At the same time, historical writing and genealogical work are not always the same thing.

This workshop will address
1) How to use the tools of family history research in historical writing
2) How to craft family stories into articles for journals such as Utah Historical Quarterly

Holly George, Utah Historical Quarterly.

Beth Taylor, FamilySearch International

**

National Historic Trails and the BLM: How Historic Trails Can Connect the Public to the Past (WORKSHOP IS FULL)
Rob Sweeten
1:00–2:30 pm, Tuesday, October 10, 2017
Archives Training Room, State Archives Building
346 S. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City

Rob Sweeten is BLM National Trail Administrator for the Old Spanish National Historic Trail and Historic Trails lead for BLM-Utah.

**

BLM-Utah’s Cultural Resource Program: Organization, Goals, and Highlights (WORKSHOP IS FULL)
Nate Thomas
3:00–4:00 pm, Tuesday, October 10, 2017
Archives Training Room, State Archives Building
346 S. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City

Nate Thomas is State Archaeologist and Cultural Resource Program Lead for BLM-Utah



Wednesday, October 11th

8:00 am check in and morning refreshments
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Plenary, lunchtime keynote and awards presentation, history and panel sessions
Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 West 3100 South, West Valley

Schedule at a Glance

Room 201 & 202 Room 204 Room 205 Great Hall – West Great Hall – East
9:00-10:15am
Great Hall 1
Plenary Session — Peril, Conflict, and Storytelling in Community History
Speakers: David Rich Lewis (moderator), Elizabeth Clement, Gregory Smoak, and Benjamin Pykles
10:30-11:45am Familiar Places: Glimpses of Home and Community National Institutions, Local Crises Territorial History and Its Records Cooperation and the Preservation of Historic Places Writing Regional History: Gary Topping’s Utah Historians and the Reconstruction of Western History
Noon-1:30pm
Great Hall 1
Lunch (free for registered attendees)

Keynote
Ken Verdoia
I’m not a Historian, But I Played One On TV

2017 Outstanding Achievement Awards Program
Dina Blaes, Chair, Board of State History

1:45-3:00pm Food and Culture: Daily Life in Northern Utah

 

Pedagogy in the Digital Era Historic Preservation in Salt Lake City Knowledge is Power: Education in Utah History of the Southern Paiute Tribe Restoration Act
3:15-4:30pm Cache Valley Utah Drug Court Oral History Project: A Community-Driven Effort Religion and the Community The Impact of Independent Film on Local Communities Interpreting Controversy: Preserving and Presenting the Story of Joe Hill Understanding 20th-Century Utah: James Allen’s Still the Right Place: Utah’s Second Half-Century of Statehood, 1945-1995

 


Click here for detailed session and speaker information

Registration is now closed

Walk-ins will be accepted as space allows.  We may not be able to accommodate lunch for walk-ins. 

Thank you to our generous conference sponsors!

    
    
    

Tschanz Rare Books, LLC

Detailed History Sessions “Local Matters”

Registration is now closed

Walk-ins will be accepted as space allows. We may not be able to accommodate lunch for walk-ins.

10/11/2017 Utah Cultural Celebration Center
Time Session Titles and Speakers
10:30 – 11:45am Familiar Places: Glimpses of Home and Community

Chair: Laurie Bryant, Utah Division of State History

Alan B. Barnett
There’s No Place Like Home: Named Houses in Utah

Bruce W. Worthen
Voices from a Distant Town: Community Formation in the Remote Settlements of Antebellum Utah

Clint Pumphrey
Daggett County at 100: New Approaches to a Colorful Past

National Institutions, Local Crises

Chair: Greg Davis, Department of Heritage and Arts

J. Scott Bushman
A History of Fighting Forest Fires in Northern Utah:  Local Initiatives that Contributed to National Solutions

Joseph F. Darowski
Struggling with the Three Rs: Relief, Recovery, and Reform in Utah during the Great Depression (1930–1940)

Ben Kiser
When the Army Came to Town:  WWII, the Cold War, and the Aftermath in Tooele County

  Territorial History and Its Records

Chair: Colleen Whitley

Kenneth Alford
Utah and the American Civil War: The Written Record

Richard Quartaroli
John Wesley Powell’s Explorations and Surveying of the Colorado River and Its Tributaries, 1871–1872, with the Assistance of Mormon Communities

  Cooperation and the Preservation of Historic Places

Chair: Gay Cookson, Department of Heritage and Arts

Adriane Herrick Juarez
Honoring the Past, Moving into the Future: The Renovation of the Historic Park City Library

Lisa Michele Church
The Page Ranch Story: Preserving a Local Treasure

Leighton M. Quarles
The Fort Douglas Heritage Commons: A Model of Public-Private Cooperation in Historic Preservation

Writing Regional History: Gary Topping’s Utah Historians and the Reconstruction of Western History

Gary Topping, Polly Aird, Richard Saunders, Gary Bergera, Jedediah Rogers (moderator)

Noon – 1:30pm Lunch

2017 Outstanding Achievement Awards Program
Dina Blaes, Chair Board of State History

Keynote
Ken Verdoia
I’m Not A Historian, But I Played One on TV

1:45 – 3:00pm Food and Culture: Daily Life in Northern Utah

Chair: Melissa Coy, Utah Division of State History

Darcy Pumphrey
Brigham Young College: A Case Study in LDS Education at the Turn of the Twentieth Century

Cody Patton
Beehive Brews: The Surprising Story of Beer in Utah

Lisa Barr
Local Food Producers of Cache Valley, Utah

Pedagogy in the Digital Era

Chair: Wendy Rex-Atzet, Utah Division of State History

Hadyn B. Call
The Driven 2 Teach Program: A History

Brenden Rensink, Brent Rogers, Jay H. Buckley                                                   Making Local History Digital: Intermountain Histories

Historic Preservation in Salt Lake City

Chair: Susan Rugh, Brigham Young University

William G. Hartley
One Salt Lake Landmark Saved, One Left to Disintegrate:  Nicholas G. Morgan and Architect Edward O. Anderson’s Crusade to Save the Old City Hall and Turn Pioneer Park into a Jewel

Walter Jones
Salt Lake City’s Magnificent Knutsford Hotel

Nan Weber and Allen Roberts
The Salt Lake City Building Legacy of Master Architect Richard K. A. Kletting

  Knowledge is Power: Education in Utah

Chair: Kerri Nakamura, Department of Heritage and Arts

Mervin Brewer
Echoes from the Chalkboard: Public School Buildings of the Past

Mark W. Buchanan
“School in the Other Fellows Town Seven Miles Distant”: Cache County School Consolidation, 1908

Brett D. Dowdle
“Putting Our Clutches to His Very Throat”: The Reconstruction of Education in Utah, 1867–1890

History of the Southern Paiute Tribe Restoration Act

Larry Echohawk, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; Travis Parashonts, Paiute Tribe; Dorena Martineau, Paiute Tribe; Mary Sloan (moderator), attorney

3:15 – 4:30pm Cache Valley Utah Drug Court Oral History Project: A Community-Driven Effort

Randy Williams (moderator), Jennifer Duncan, Thomas L. Willmore, Brock Alder

Religion and the Community

Chair: Nelson Knight, Department of Heritage and Arts

Alan J. Clark
“I’m Going Through”: Bringing Pentecostal Christianity to Utah

Jeffery O. Johnson
“Shaking the Tree”: The Impact of Signature Books on the Mormon Community

Jessica Nelson
Mormonism and the Negro, African Americans, and LDS Racism at Utah State University, 1960–1961

The Impact of Independent Film on Local Communities
Doug Fabrizio or Elaine Clarke (moderator), KUER, RadioWest
Patrick Hubley, Program Director, Utah Film Center
Virgina Pearce, Director, Utah Film Commission
Local Filmmakers: Tyler Measom, Film: Sons of Perdition, Jenny MacKenzie and Jorden Saxton Hackney, Jennie MacKenzie Films, Film: Dying In Vein

Interpreting Controversy: Preserving and Presenting the Story of Joe Hill

Jeremy Harmon; Jim Kichas; Quinn Rollins

Understanding 20th-Century Utah: James Allen’s Still the Right Place: Utah’s Second Half-Century of Statehood, 1945-1995

James Allen; Thomas Alexander; Brian Cannon; Michael Homer; Eric Swedin; Brad Westwood (moderator)

Registration is now closed

Walk-ins will be accepted as space allows.  We may not be able to accommodate lunch for walk-ins. 

2016 State History Conference Sessions

Missed out on the 2016 State History Conference “Rural Utah, Western Issues”? Below are some select sessions that were recorded.

Historical Perspectives on the Public Lands Debate in the American West

  • Leisl Carr Childers is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Northern Iowa where she coordinates the Public History program and teaches the American West.
  • Joseph E. Taylor III is a professor of history at Simon Fraser University. He has written broadly about gentrification and the struggles to control access to natural resources. He is currently mapping the history of transfer payments to western counties for activities occurring on federal lands.

Early Rural Utah in the Uinta Basin

  • Lee Kreutzer (chair)
  • Elizabeth Hora-Cook: Public Spaces and Private Places: The Construction of Social Landscapes in Jones Hole Canyon, Utah
  • Judson Byrd Finley: The Fremont Archaeology of Dinosaur National Monument: Fifty Years after Breternitz

Industrial and Natural Landscapes

  • Nelson Knight (chair)
  • Mark Karpinski: Utah Coal Company Towns: Rural Towns Created to Fuel Western Urbanization
  • Susie Petheram: The Jordan River Then and Now: From Rural Resource to Urban Resource
  • Jessica F. Montcalm: Echoes from the Camp: Sego as a Case Study in Identifying and Industrial Landscape

New Methods, Historical Innovation

  • Gregory C. Thompson (chair)
  • Justin Sorensen: Exploring Utah’s Nuclear History through the Downwinders of Utah Archive
  • Cami Ann Dilg: The past that was differs little from the past that was not”: Pictographs and Petroglyphs in Cormac McCarthy’s Blood Meridian or the Evening Redness in the West
  • Kenneth P. Cannon: Across the Desert: The Archaeology of the Chinese Railroad Workers, Box Elder County, Utah

The Personal and the Political

  • Colleen Whitley (chair)
  • Devan Jensen and Kenneth L. Alford: Cynthia Park Stowell: Wife of a Utah War POW
  • Walter R. Jones: A Tragic Set of Events in Early-Twentieth-Century Rural Uinta County, Wyoming
  • Kenneth L. Cannon II: Frank Cannon, the Salt Lake Tribune, and the Alta Club

Voices from the Desert: Rural Issues in Southeastern Utah

  • Panel: Robert S. McPherson (moderator and panelist), Winston Hurst, Rick Eldredge, Mike Noel

Participants will address the loss and acquisition of land by Native Americans; the use and abuse of Ancestral Puebloan sites and artifacts; the multifaceted issues of law enforcement in a complex, disputed environment; and the impact of the Grand-Staircase Monument on residents twenty years after its inception. Moving from past to present, panelists will share views on how history has shaped contemporary issues.

World War I in Rural Utah

  • Robert S. Voyles (chair)
  • Kerry William Bate: Kanarraville Women Fight World War I
  • Robert S. McPherson: Native American Reaction to World War I
  • Allan Kent Powell: World War I in Castle Valley: The Impact of the War on Carbon and Emery Counties

2016 State History Conference Schedule

Online registration is now closed.  Walk in registrations will be accepted as space allows. 

Friday, Sept. 30th, 2016
Utah Cultural Celebration Center

Printable conference program

**Conference At A Glance

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Plenary Session (Great Hall)

Panel: Gregory Smoak (moderator), Leisl Carr Childers, and Jay Taylor

Historical Perspectives on the Public Lands Debate in the American West

Leisl Carr Childers photoLeisl Carr Childers is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Northern Iowa where she coordinates the Public History program and teaches the American West. She earned her doctorate at the University of Nevada Las Vegas, where she worked as the Assistant Director of the Nevada Test Site Oral History Project. She garnered several awards for her research on the Great Basin, including UNLV’s prestigious President’s Fellowship, UNI’s Faculty Summer Fellowship, and the Charles Redd Center for Western Studies Summer and Publication Awards. Her experiences collecting oral histories from those who worked at the test site or were affected by nuclear testing in addition to her own recreational activities on public lands provided the foundation for her project. Her first book, The Size of the Risk: Histories of Multiple Use in the Great Basin, received a Spur Award from the Western Writers of America and has garnered praise from reviewers in journals diverse as Montana The Magazine of Western History and the American Historical Review.

Jay Taylor photoJoseph E. Taylor III is a professor of history at Simon Fraser University. He has written broadly about gentrification and the struggles to control access to natural resources, including Making Salmon, about the fisheries crisis in the Pacific Northwest, and Pilgrims of the Vertical, about the cultural and environmental stakes of modern rock climbing. His current research focuses on the legislative history of Progressive Era and New Deal conservation, and he is mapping the history of transfer payments to western counties for activities occurring on federal lands.


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World War I in Rural Utah (Room 101 and 102)

  • Robert S. Voyles (chair)
  • Kerry William Bate: Kanarraville Women Fight World War I
  • Robert S. McPherson: Native American Reaction to World War I
  • Allan Kent Powell: World War I in Castle Valley: The Impact of the War on Carbon and Emery Counties

Early Rural Utah in the Uinta Basin (Room 104)

  • Lee Kreutzer (chair)
  • Elizabeth Hora-Cook: Public Spaces and Private Places: The Construction of Social Landscapes in Jones Hole Canyon, Utah
  • Judson Byrd Finley: The Fremont Archaeology of Dinosaur National Monument: Fifty Years after Breternitz

Evaluating The Awkward State of Utah (Great Hall East)

  • Panel: Brad Westwood (moderator), Jay H. Buckley, Brian Q. Cannon, Matthew Godfrey, Lisa Olsen Tait, John Sillito

Accessing Statewide Heritage Resources (Room105)

  • Panel: Roger Roper (moderator), Jennifer Ortiz, Megan Van Frank, Janell Tuttle, Ray Matthews

Representatives from several agencies and organizations will describe the programs (including grants) they have for assisting communities with history-related projects.

Bringing the Art of Decorative Paper Cutting into the Twenty-first Century (Board Room)

  • Susannah Nilsson, Cindy Bean

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Lunch Program

12:10 p.m. Welcome
Dina Blaes, Chair, Board of State History

12:15 p.m. Update on Division of State History
Brad Westwood, Director, Division of State History

12:20 p.m. 2016 Annual Utah State History Awards
Dina Blaes, Chair, Board of State History

12:35 p.m. Introduction of Dr. Patty Limerick
Dina Blaes, Chair, Board of State History

12:40 p.m. Keynote

Quicksand, Cactus, and the Power of History in Polarized Times:

Bringing Juanita Brooks and Dale L. Morgan Back into Our Conversation

Dr. Patty Limerick, Faculty Director and Chair of the Board of the Center of the American West

As chroniclers tracking the journeys of human beings through the terrain of time, today’s historians stand in an unsettled relationship with their own predecessors and forebears. It is not uncommon for historians to treat the work of the historical writers of the past as outmoded and irrelevant, even as they lament the public’s failure to pay proper respect to the importance of the past! And yet, as this talk will reveal, intense feelings and attitudes—impatience to inspiration, vexation to affectionswirl and surge just beneath the surface of one of the world’s dreariest terms:  “the historiography of the American West.” Seizing the welcome opportunity to speak at the Utah State History Conference in 2016, Patty Limerick will explore the examples set by Utah historians, Juanita Brooks and Dale L. Morgan. How can the work, conduct, and character of those two close friends guide us today in the strenuous work of applying historical perspective to the dilemmas of the contemporary West? Leaving a legacy of guidance for her successors in Western American history, Juanita Brooks recorded the advice that her cowboy father gave her:

I’ve learned that if I ride in the herd, I am lost—totally helpless. One who rides counter to [the herd] is trampled and killed. One who only trails behind means little, because he leaves all responsibility to others. It is the cowboy who rides the edge of the herd, who sings and calls and makes himself heard who helps direct the course. . . . So don’t lose yourself, and don’t ride away and desert the outfit. Ride the edge of the herd and be alert, but know your directions, and call out loud and clear. Chances are, you won’t make any difference, but on the other hand, you just might.

It may not be an everyday custom for Western American historians to embrace a life lesson offered by Western American cowboys, but on September 30, 2016, Patty Limerick will give this a try.

 

Patty Limerick is the Faculty Director and Chair of the Board of the Center of the American West at the University of Colorado, where she is also a Professor of History. Limerick received her Ph.D. in American Studies from Yale University in Yale University in 1980, and from 1980 to 1984 she was an Assistant Professor of History at Harvard. In 1985 she published Desert Passages, followed in 1987 by her best-known work, The Legacy of Conquest, an overview and reinterpretation of Western American history that has stirred up a great deal of both academic and public debate. In 2012 she published A Ditch in Time: The City, the West, and Water, a history of water in Denver. Limerick is also a prolific essayist.

Limerick has received a number of awards and honors recognizing the impact of her scholarship and her commitment to teaching, including the MacArthur Fellowship (1995 to 2000) and the Hazel Barnes Prize, the University of Colorado’s highest award for teaching and research (2001). She has chaired the 2011 Pulitzer jury in History.

Limerick has served as President of the Organization of American Historians, American Studies Association, the Western History Association, and the Society of American Historians, and as the Vice President of the Teaching Division of the American Historical Association. She is currently the President of the Organization of American Historians.

In 1986, Limerick co-founded the Center of the American West, and since 1995 it has been her primary point of affiliation. During her tenure, the Center has published a number of books, including the influential Atlas of the New West (1997), and a series of lively, balanced, and to-the-point reports on compelling Western issues.

The Center of the American West serves as a forum committed to the civil, respectful, problem-solving exploration of important, often contentious, public issues.


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What Role Do Historians Play in Public Land and Water Policy? (Rooms 101 & 102)

  • Panel: Patty Limerick, Joseph E. Taylor III, Leisl Carr Childers, and Jedediah Rogers (moderator)

The conference theme provides a forum for historians and scholars to apply their methodology and discipline to questions that have contemporary—and, frequently, political—resonance. But what role, precisely, does the historian play in contributing to sensitive, political issues over public lands, water, and environmental conflict? The discussion will focus not so much on public lands and water as on the boundaries, limitations, and strengths of the discipline of history to pressing contemporary western issues.

New Methods, Historical Innovation (Room 104)

  • Gregory C. Thompson (chair)
  • Justin Sorensen: Exploring Utah’s Nuclear History through the Downwinders of Utah Archive
  • Cami Ann Dilg: The past that was differs little from the past that was not”: Pictographs and Petroglyphs in Cormac McCarthy’s Blood Meridian or the Evening Redness in the West
  • Kenneth P. Cannon: Across the Desert: The Archaeology of the Chinese Railroad Workers, Box Elder County, Utah

Evolving Small Towns (Room 105)

  • Dina Blaes (chair)
  • Linda Thatcher: J. C. Penney Stores and How They Changed Rural Main Streets in Utah
  • Michael Hansen: Plat for the City of Zion: Past, Present, and Future
  • Shannon Ellsworth: Handcarts, Homesteads, and Hipsters: What Millennials Have in Common with Mormon Pioneers

The Personal and the Political (Great Hall – west)

  • Colleen Whitley (chair)
  • Devan Jensen and Kenneth L. Alford: Cynthia Park Stowell: Wife of a Utah War POW
  • Walter R. Jones: A Tragic Set of Events in Early-Twentieth-Century Rural Uinta County, Wyoming
  • Kenneth L. Cannon II: Frank Cannon, the Salt Lake Tribune, and the Alta Club

Lark, Utah: A Public History Event (Great Hall – east)

  • Chris Merritt, Utah State History, Antiquities Section
  • Dr. Ted Moore, Salt Lake Community College
  • Jessica Montcalm, Division of Oil, Gas, and Mining
  • Steve Richarson and Ren Willie, Lark Residents
  • Betsey Welland, Marriott Library, University of Utah
  • Margaret Benson, Marriott Library

In 1978, retirees, immigrants, mine workers, and others were displaced from their homes at Lark by mine expansion. Over the last three years, archaeologists and historians with the Utah Division of State History, Salt Lake Community College, University of Utah, and Utah State University have worked with former Lark residents, or their descendants, to tell their story again. Session will include formal presentations on the town’s history.  In the Board Room, an oral history booth, a document scanning table and more will be available.

Lark Oral Histories (Board Room)


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Rural Utah, National Destinations: Developing Utah’s National Parks (Rooms 101 & 102)

  • Leighton M. Quarles (chair and moderator)
  • Susan Rhoades Neel: National Park Expansion in Utah during the New Deal
  • Paula Mitchell: The Grand Circle Tour: Early Tourism in Zion, Bryce, North Rim, and Cedar Breaks
  • Michael Shamo: Creating Canyonlands: Southeastern Utah’s Bid to Benefit from Federal Lands

This hybrid paper session/panel discussion explores the dynamics of national park development in Utah with an emphasis on interaction with and impact on surrounding communities. Following the presentations a brief panel discussion will address the ongoing relevance of these overlapping histories.

Voices from the Desert: Rural Issues in Southeastern Utah (Room 104)

  • Panel: Robert S. McPherson (moderator and panelist), Winston Hurst, Rick Eldredge, Mike Noel

Participants will address the loss and acquisition of land by Native Americans; the use and abuse of Ancestral Puebloan sites and artifacts; the multifaceted issues of law enforcement in a complex, disputed environment; and the impact of the Grand-Staircase Monument on residents twenty years after its inception. Moving from past to present, panelists will share views on how history has shaped contemporary issues.

Land Stewardship in Northern Utah (Room 105)

  • Dave Whittekiend (chair)
  • Charles Condrat: Watersheds and Historic Properties: Environmental Rehabilitation and Resulting Affects to Historic Character
  • Carol Majeske: Collaborative Efforts and Successful Reforestation, a History of the Salt Lake Forest Reserve
  • Rachelle Handley: The Legacy of Recreation and Historic Buildings: Preservation and Adaptive Re-Use on the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest
  • Scott Bushman: John Fell Squires and the Creation of the Logan Forest Reserve

Industrial and Natural Landscapes (Great Hall – west)

  • Nelson Knight (chair)
  • Mark Karpinski: Utah Coal Company Towns: Rural Towns Created to Fuel Western Urbanization
  • Susie Petheram: The Jordan River Then and Now: From Rural Resource to Urban Resource
  • Jessica F. Montcalm: Echoes from the Camp: Sego as a Case Study in Identifying an Industrial Landscape

Lark, Utah: A Public History Event (continued) (Great Hall – east)

In 1978, retirees, immigrants, mine workers, and others were displaced from their homes at Lark by mine expansion. Over the last three years, archaeologists and historians with the Utah Division of State History, Salt Lake Community College, University of Utah, and Utah State University have worked with former Lark residents, or their descendants, to tell their story again. Session will include formal presentations on the town’s history, an oral history booth, a document scanning table and more.

Lark Oral Histories (continued) (Board Room)

Thank you to our conference sponsors:

American Institute of Architects (Utah chapter), American Planning Association (Utah chapter), American West Center (U of U), Ames Construction, Charles Redd Center for Western Studies (BYU), Chevron, Fort Douglas Military Museum, Governor’s Office of Economic Development, J. Willard Marriott Library (U of U), LDS Church History Department, National Park Service, Resonance Printing Solutions, U of U History Department, USU History Department, Utah Cultural Celebration Center, Utah Humanities, Utah Westerners.

Online registration is now closed. Walk in registrations will be accepted as space allows.