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Category Archives: Annual Conference

2017 Utah State History Conference

Local Matters:
Interweaving historical threads of community

October 10–11, 2017

In 2017, we’re focusing on Local Matters—and local can be broadly defined.

Our annual conference will examine the many strands that create the fabric of communities, such as festivals, buildings, schools, or the arts.

We’ll also discuss the uses of local history and the application of sophisticated methodology to personal, family, and community history.

Workshops will focus on strategies for local organizations, oral history, historic preservation, and community histories.


CONFERENCE SCHEDULE OVERVIEW

Tuesday, October 10th
9:00 am–5:00 pm
Workshops
Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City
State Archives Building, 346 South Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City

Wednesday, October 11th
8:00 am–5:00 pm
Plenary, lunchtime keynote and awards presentation, history and panel sessions
Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 West 3100 South, West Valley

 



DETAILED CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

Tuesday, October 10th
9:00 am–5:00 pm
Workshops
Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City
State Archives Building, 346 South Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City

Introduction to Oral History
Megan van Frank and Jedediah Rogers
9 am–noon, Tuesday, October 10, 2017
Zephyr Room, Rio Grande Depot
300 S. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City

Oral history is a powerful tool for people to understand their family stories and community history. Whether used for scholarly research, finding community stories, or fleshing out one’s family history, oral history provides unusual access to stories not otherwise known or in danger of being lost. This workshop will provide a focused introduction to the art and craft of oral history: to the philosophical underpinnings of the discipline—what it can, and cannot, tell us about the past—and to the nuts and bolts of executing successful oral history projects. An orientation to the Utah Humanities and Utah Division of State History joint oral history program will also be provided.

Megan van Frank directs community history and museums programming for Utah Humanities.

Jedediah Rogers is a Senior State Historian at the Utah Division of State History and co-managing editor of the Utah Historical Quarterly.

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Community Preservation
Presented by SHPO staff at Division of State History
8:30 am–noon, Tuesday, October 10, 2017
Archives Training Room, State Archives Building
346 S. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City

This workshop will provide the tools and techniques for running successful local historic preservation programs, including incentives, guidelines and regulations, planning tools, partnerships, public education, and grants and tax credits. Find out whether your community is taking advantage of all resources available to it.

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Family History Meets History
Holly George
1:00 – 3:30 pm, Tuesday, October 10, 2017
Board Room, Rio Grande Depot
300 S. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City

The world of family history has much to offer—both tools and stories—to the writers of history. At the same time, historical writing and genealogical work are not always the same thing.

This workshop will address
1) How to use the tools of family history research in historical writing
2) How to craft family stories into articles for journals such as Utah Historical Quarterly

Holly George is a Senior State Historian at the Utah Division of State History and co-managing editor of the Utah Historical Quarterly.

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National Historic Trails and the BLM: How Historic Trails Can Connect the Public to the Past Rob Sweeten
1:00–2:30 pm, Tuesday, October 10, 2017
Archives Training Room, State Archives Building
346 S. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City

Rob Sweeten is BLM National Trail Administrator for the Old Spanish National Historic Trail and Historic Trails lead for BLM-Utah.

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BLM-Utah’s Cultural Resource Program: Organization, Goals, and Highlights
Nate Thomas
3:00–4:00 pm, Tuesday, October 10, 2017
Archives Training Room, State Archives Building
346 S. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City

Nate Thomas is State Archaeologist and Cultural Resource Program Lead for BLM-Utah



Wednesday, October 11th

8:00 am–5:00 pm
Plenary, lunchtime keynote and awards presentation, history and panel sessions
Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 West 3100 South, West Valley

Schedule at a Glance

Room 101 & 102 Room 104 Room 105 Great Hall I Great Hall II
9:00-10:15am
Great Hall 1
Plenary Session — Peril, Conflict, and Storytelling in Community History.
Speakers: David Rich Lewis (moderator), Gregory Smoak, Ben Pykles
10:30-11:45am Familiar Places: Glimpses of Home and Community National Institutions, Local Crises Territorial History and Its Records The Impact of Independent Film on Local Communities
Noon-1:30pm
Great Hall 1
Lunch (free for registered attendees)

Keynote
Ken Verdoia
I’m not a Historian, But I Played One On TV

2017 Outstanding Achievement Awards Program
Dina Blaes, Chair, Board of State History

1:45-3:00pm Food and Culture: Daily Life in Northern Utah

 

Pedagogy in the Digital Era Historic Preservation in Salt Lake City Knowledge is Power: Education in Utah Writing Regional History: Gary Topping’s Utah Historians and the Reconstruction of Western History
3:15-4:30 Cache Valley Utah Drug Court Oral History Project: A Community-Driven Effort Religion and the Community Cooperation and the Preservation of Historic Places Joe Hill Project Understanding 20th-Century Utah: James Allen’s Still the Right Place: Utah’s Second Half-Century of Statehood, 1945-1995

 


Click here for detailed session and speaker information

 

2016 State History Conference Sessions

Missed out on the 2016 State History Conference “Rural Utah, Western Issues”? Below are some select sessions that were recorded.

Historical Perspectives on the Public Lands Debate in the American West

  • Leisl Carr Childers is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Northern Iowa where she coordinates the Public History program and teaches the American West.
  • Joseph E. Taylor III is a professor of history at Simon Fraser University. He has written broadly about gentrification and the struggles to control access to natural resources. He is currently mapping the history of transfer payments to western counties for activities occurring on federal lands.

Early Rural Utah in the Uinta Basin

  • Lee Kreutzer (chair)
  • Elizabeth Hora-Cook: Public Spaces and Private Places: The Construction of Social Landscapes in Jones Hole Canyon, Utah
  • Judson Byrd Finley: The Fremont Archaeology of Dinosaur National Monument: Fifty Years after Breternitz

Industrial and Natural Landscapes

  • Nelson Knight (chair)
  • Mark Karpinski: Utah Coal Company Towns: Rural Towns Created to Fuel Western Urbanization
  • Susie Petheram: The Jordan River Then and Now: From Rural Resource to Urban Resource
  • Jessica F. Montcalm: Echoes from the Camp: Sego as a Case Study in Identifying and Industrial Landscape

New Methods, Historical Innovation

  • Gregory C. Thompson (chair)
  • Justin Sorensen: Exploring Utah’s Nuclear History through the Downwinders of Utah Archive
  • Cami Ann Dilg: The past that was differs little from the past that was not”: Pictographs and Petroglyphs in Cormac McCarthy’s Blood Meridian or the Evening Redness in the West
  • Kenneth P. Cannon: Across the Desert: The Archaeology of the Chinese Railroad Workers, Box Elder County, Utah

The Personal and the Political

  • Colleen Whitley (chair)
  • Devan Jensen and Kenneth L. Alford: Cynthia Park Stowell: Wife of a Utah War POW
  • Walter R. Jones: A Tragic Set of Events in Early-Twentieth-Century Rural Uinta County, Wyoming
  • Kenneth L. Cannon II: Frank Cannon, the Salt Lake Tribune, and the Alta Club

Voices from the Desert: Rural Issues in Southeastern Utah

  • Panel: Robert S. McPherson (moderator and panelist), Winston Hurst, Rick Eldredge, Mike Noel

Participants will address the loss and acquisition of land by Native Americans; the use and abuse of Ancestral Puebloan sites and artifacts; the multifaceted issues of law enforcement in a complex, disputed environment; and the impact of the Grand-Staircase Monument on residents twenty years after its inception. Moving from past to present, panelists will share views on how history has shaped contemporary issues.

World War I in Rural Utah

  • Robert S. Voyles (chair)
  • Kerry William Bate: Kanarraville Women Fight World War I
  • Robert S. McPherson: Native American Reaction to World War I
  • Allan Kent Powell: World War I in Castle Valley: The Impact of the War on Carbon and Emery Counties

2016 State History Conference Schedule

Online registration is now closed.  Walk in registrations will be accepted as space allows. 

Friday, Sept. 30th, 2016
Utah Cultural Celebration Center

Printable conference program

**Conference At A Glance

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Plenary Session (Great Hall)

Panel: Gregory Smoak (moderator), Leisl Carr Childers, and Jay Taylor

Historical Perspectives on the Public Lands Debate in the American West

Leisl Carr Childers photoLeisl Carr Childers is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Northern Iowa where she coordinates the Public History program and teaches the American West. She earned her doctorate at the University of Nevada Las Vegas, where she worked as the Assistant Director of the Nevada Test Site Oral History Project. She garnered several awards for her research on the Great Basin, including UNLV’s prestigious President’s Fellowship, UNI’s Faculty Summer Fellowship, and the Charles Redd Center for Western Studies Summer and Publication Awards. Her experiences collecting oral histories from those who worked at the test site or were affected by nuclear testing in addition to her own recreational activities on public lands provided the foundation for her project. Her first book, The Size of the Risk: Histories of Multiple Use in the Great Basin, received a Spur Award from the Western Writers of America and has garnered praise from reviewers in journals diverse as Montana The Magazine of Western History and the American Historical Review.

Jay Taylor photoJoseph E. Taylor III is a professor of history at Simon Fraser University. He has written broadly about gentrification and the struggles to control access to natural resources, including Making Salmon, about the fisheries crisis in the Pacific Northwest, and Pilgrims of the Vertical, about the cultural and environmental stakes of modern rock climbing. His current research focuses on the legislative history of Progressive Era and New Deal conservation, and he is mapping the history of transfer payments to western counties for activities occurring on federal lands.


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World War I in Rural Utah (Room 101 and 102)

  • Robert S. Voyles (chair)
  • Kerry William Bate: Kanarraville Women Fight World War I
  • Robert S. McPherson: Native American Reaction to World War I
  • Allan Kent Powell: World War I in Castle Valley: The Impact of the War on Carbon and Emery Counties

Early Rural Utah in the Uinta Basin (Room 104)

  • Lee Kreutzer (chair)
  • Elizabeth Hora-Cook: Public Spaces and Private Places: The Construction of Social Landscapes in Jones Hole Canyon, Utah
  • Judson Byrd Finley: The Fremont Archaeology of Dinosaur National Monument: Fifty Years after Breternitz

Evaluating The Awkward State of Utah (Great Hall East)

  • Panel: Brad Westwood (moderator), Jay H. Buckley, Brian Q. Cannon, Matthew Godfrey, Lisa Olsen Tait, John Sillito

Accessing Statewide Heritage Resources (Room105)

  • Panel: Roger Roper (moderator), Jennifer Ortiz, Megan Van Frank, Janell Tuttle, Ray Matthews

Representatives from several agencies and organizations will describe the programs (including grants) they have for assisting communities with history-related projects.

Bringing the Art of Decorative Paper Cutting into the Twenty-first Century (Board Room)

  • Susannah Nilsson, Cindy Bean

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Lunch Program

12:10 p.m. Welcome
Dina Blaes, Chair, Board of State History

12:15 p.m. Update on Division of State History
Brad Westwood, Director, Division of State History

12:20 p.m. 2016 Annual Utah State History Awards
Dina Blaes, Chair, Board of State History

12:35 p.m. Introduction of Dr. Patty Limerick
Dina Blaes, Chair, Board of State History

12:40 p.m. Keynote

Quicksand, Cactus, and the Power of History in Polarized Times:

Bringing Juanita Brooks and Dale L. Morgan Back into Our Conversation

Dr. Patty Limerick, Faculty Director and Chair of the Board of the Center of the American West

As chroniclers tracking the journeys of human beings through the terrain of time, today’s historians stand in an unsettled relationship with their own predecessors and forebears. It is not uncommon for historians to treat the work of the historical writers of the past as outmoded and irrelevant, even as they lament the public’s failure to pay proper respect to the importance of the past! And yet, as this talk will reveal, intense feelings and attitudes—impatience to inspiration, vexation to affectionswirl and surge just beneath the surface of one of the world’s dreariest terms:  “the historiography of the American West.” Seizing the welcome opportunity to speak at the Utah State History Conference in 2016, Patty Limerick will explore the examples set by Utah historians, Juanita Brooks and Dale L. Morgan. How can the work, conduct, and character of those two close friends guide us today in the strenuous work of applying historical perspective to the dilemmas of the contemporary West? Leaving a legacy of guidance for her successors in Western American history, Juanita Brooks recorded the advice that her cowboy father gave her:

I’ve learned that if I ride in the herd, I am lost—totally helpless. One who rides counter to [the herd] is trampled and killed. One who only trails behind means little, because he leaves all responsibility to others. It is the cowboy who rides the edge of the herd, who sings and calls and makes himself heard who helps direct the course. . . . So don’t lose yourself, and don’t ride away and desert the outfit. Ride the edge of the herd and be alert, but know your directions, and call out loud and clear. Chances are, you won’t make any difference, but on the other hand, you just might.

It may not be an everyday custom for Western American historians to embrace a life lesson offered by Western American cowboys, but on September 30, 2016, Patty Limerick will give this a try.

 

Patty Limerick is the Faculty Director and Chair of the Board of the Center of the American West at the University of Colorado, where she is also a Professor of History. Limerick received her Ph.D. in American Studies from Yale University in Yale University in 1980, and from 1980 to 1984 she was an Assistant Professor of History at Harvard. In 1985 she published Desert Passages, followed in 1987 by her best-known work, The Legacy of Conquest, an overview and reinterpretation of Western American history that has stirred up a great deal of both academic and public debate. In 2012 she published A Ditch in Time: The City, the West, and Water, a history of water in Denver. Limerick is also a prolific essayist.

Limerick has received a number of awards and honors recognizing the impact of her scholarship and her commitment to teaching, including the MacArthur Fellowship (1995 to 2000) and the Hazel Barnes Prize, the University of Colorado’s highest award for teaching and research (2001). She has chaired the 2011 Pulitzer jury in History.

Limerick has served as President of the Organization of American Historians, American Studies Association, the Western History Association, and the Society of American Historians, and as the Vice President of the Teaching Division of the American Historical Association. She is currently the President of the Organization of American Historians.

In 1986, Limerick co-founded the Center of the American West, and since 1995 it has been her primary point of affiliation. During her tenure, the Center has published a number of books, including the influential Atlas of the New West (1997), and a series of lively, balanced, and to-the-point reports on compelling Western issues.

The Center of the American West serves as a forum committed to the civil, respectful, problem-solving exploration of important, often contentious, public issues.


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What Role Do Historians Play in Public Land and Water Policy? (Rooms 101 & 102)

  • Panel: Patty Limerick, Joseph E. Taylor III, Leisl Carr Childers, and Jedediah Rogers (moderator)

The conference theme provides a forum for historians and scholars to apply their methodology and discipline to questions that have contemporary—and, frequently, political—resonance. But what role, precisely, does the historian play in contributing to sensitive, political issues over public lands, water, and environmental conflict? The discussion will focus not so much on public lands and water as on the boundaries, limitations, and strengths of the discipline of history to pressing contemporary western issues.

New Methods, Historical Innovation (Room 104)

  • Gregory C. Thompson (chair)
  • Justin Sorensen: Exploring Utah’s Nuclear History through the Downwinders of Utah Archive
  • Cami Ann Dilg: The past that was differs little from the past that was not”: Pictographs and Petroglyphs in Cormac McCarthy’s Blood Meridian or the Evening Redness in the West
  • Kenneth P. Cannon: Across the Desert: The Archaeology of the Chinese Railroad Workers, Box Elder County, Utah

Evolving Small Towns (Room 105)

  • Dina Blaes (chair)
  • Linda Thatcher: J. C. Penney Stores and How They Changed Rural Main Streets in Utah
  • Michael Hansen: Plat for the City of Zion: Past, Present, and Future
  • Shannon Ellsworth: Handcarts, Homesteads, and Hipsters: What Millennials Have in Common with Mormon Pioneers

The Personal and the Political (Great Hall – west)

  • Colleen Whitley (chair)
  • Devan Jensen and Kenneth L. Alford: Cynthia Park Stowell: Wife of a Utah War POW
  • Walter R. Jones: A Tragic Set of Events in Early-Twentieth-Century Rural Uinta County, Wyoming
  • Kenneth L. Cannon II: Frank Cannon, the Salt Lake Tribune, and the Alta Club

Lark, Utah: A Public History Event (Great Hall – east)

  • Chris Merritt, Utah State History, Antiquities Section
  • Dr. Ted Moore, Salt Lake Community College
  • Jessica Montcalm, Division of Oil, Gas, and Mining
  • Steve Richarson and Ren Willie, Lark Residents
  • Betsey Welland, Marriott Library, University of Utah
  • Margaret Benson, Marriott Library

In 1978, retirees, immigrants, mine workers, and others were displaced from their homes at Lark by mine expansion. Over the last three years, archaeologists and historians with the Utah Division of State History, Salt Lake Community College, University of Utah, and Utah State University have worked with former Lark residents, or their descendants, to tell their story again. Session will include formal presentations on the town’s history.  In the Board Room, an oral history booth, a document scanning table and more will be available.

Lark Oral Histories (Board Room)


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Rural Utah, National Destinations: Developing Utah’s National Parks (Rooms 101 & 102)

  • Leighton M. Quarles (chair and moderator)
  • Susan Rhoades Neel: National Park Expansion in Utah during the New Deal
  • Paula Mitchell: The Grand Circle Tour: Early Tourism in Zion, Bryce, North Rim, and Cedar Breaks
  • Michael Shamo: Creating Canyonlands: Southeastern Utah’s Bid to Benefit from Federal Lands

This hybrid paper session/panel discussion explores the dynamics of national park development in Utah with an emphasis on interaction with and impact on surrounding communities. Following the presentations a brief panel discussion will address the ongoing relevance of these overlapping histories.

Voices from the Desert: Rural Issues in Southeastern Utah (Room 104)

  • Panel: Robert S. McPherson (moderator and panelist), Winston Hurst, Rick Eldredge, Mike Noel

Participants will address the loss and acquisition of land by Native Americans; the use and abuse of Ancestral Puebloan sites and artifacts; the multifaceted issues of law enforcement in a complex, disputed environment; and the impact of the Grand-Staircase Monument on residents twenty years after its inception. Moving from past to present, panelists will share views on how history has shaped contemporary issues.

Land Stewardship in Northern Utah (Room 105)

  • Dave Whittekiend (chair)
  • Charles Condrat: Watersheds and Historic Properties: Environmental Rehabilitation and Resulting Affects to Historic Character
  • Carol Majeske: Collaborative Efforts and Successful Reforestation, a History of the Salt Lake Forest Reserve
  • Rachelle Handley: The Legacy of Recreation and Historic Buildings: Preservation and Adaptive Re-Use on the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest
  • Scott Bushman: John Fell Squires and the Creation of the Logan Forest Reserve

Industrial and Natural Landscapes (Great Hall – west)

  • Nelson Knight (chair)
  • Mark Karpinski: Utah Coal Company Towns: Rural Towns Created to Fuel Western Urbanization
  • Susie Petheram: The Jordan River Then and Now: From Rural Resource to Urban Resource
  • Jessica F. Montcalm: Echoes from the Camp: Sego as a Case Study in Identifying an Industrial Landscape

Lark, Utah: A Public History Event (continued) (Great Hall – east)

In 1978, retirees, immigrants, mine workers, and others were displaced from their homes at Lark by mine expansion. Over the last three years, archaeologists and historians with the Utah Division of State History, Salt Lake Community College, University of Utah, and Utah State University have worked with former Lark residents, or their descendants, to tell their story again. Session will include formal presentations on the town’s history, an oral history booth, a document scanning table and more.

Lark Oral Histories (continued) (Board Room)

Thank you to our conference sponsors:

American Institute of Architects (Utah chapter), American Planning Association (Utah chapter), American West Center (U of U), Ames Construction, Charles Redd Center for Western Studies (BYU), Chevron, Fort Douglas Military Museum, Governor’s Office of Economic Development, J. Willard Marriott Library (U of U), LDS Church History Department, National Park Service, Resonance Printing Solutions, U of U History Department, USU History Department, Utah Cultural Celebration Center, Utah Humanities, Utah Westerners.

Online registration is now closed. Walk in registrations will be accepted as space allows.

2016 State History Conference Workshop Schedule

Online registration is now closed.

**Conference At A Glance

Thursday, Sept. 29th, 2016
Conference Workshops/Seminars
Rio Grande Depot

 

9:00 am – noon

 

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Seminar (Zephyr Room)  (SEMINAR IS FULL)
Megan van Frank and Jedediah Rogers

Oral history is a powerful tool for people to understand their family stories and community history. Whether used for scholarly research, finding community stories, or fleshing out one’s family history, oral history provides unusual access to stories not otherwise known or in danger of being lost. This workshop will provide a focused introduction to the art and craft of oral history: to the philosophical underpinnings of the discipline—what it can, and cannot, tell us about the past—and to the nuts and bolts of executing successful oral history projects. Participants will learn how to make pre-interview preparations, interact with interviewees, conduct interviews, and transcribe and archive recorded interviews. They will receive experiential practice preparing probing questions, conducting an interview, and editing an oral history transcript. An orientation to the Utah Humanities and Utah Division of State History joint oral history program will also be provided.

Megan van Frank directs community history and museums programming for Utah Humanities.
Jedediah Rogers is a Senior State Historian at the Utah Division of State History and co-managing editor of the Utah Historical Quarterly.

Co-sponsored by Utah Humanities.


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Workshop (West Lecture Room) (WORKSHOP IS FULL)
Roger Roper and Cory Jensen

This workshop session will address the basic components—and many of the nuances—of evaluating historic buildings. It will cover assessments of historic integrity, evaluations of significance (National Register eligibility), the affects of additions and alterations, and appropriate and inappropriate rehabilitation work. The wide-ranging discussion should be of interest to cultural resource professionals as well as amateur old-building aficionados.

Part I, Historic Building Evaluations, will address a wide variety of issues and examples related to the following:

  • Assessing the historic integrity of buildings and structures, including the effect of alterations and additions. Can “really significant” properties absorb more changes without losing their integrity? How can the “seven aspects of integrity” be applied most effectively? What other tools and cues can be used to make valid assessments?
  • Evaluating the National Register eligibility of historic properties. How much information is needed to make an appropriate evaluation? Does the evaluation process vary depending on which criteria you are trying to use? How “final” are evaluations? Under what circumstances can evaluations be changed?
  • Assessing “effects” of undertakings for Section 106 purposes. What types of impacts trigger “adverse effects”? Do those same types of impacts affect a property’s historic integrity or National Register eligibility? Would any of those impacts ever be allowed on a certified rehabilitation tax credit project?
  • Using “phased documentation” to assess historic properties incrementally, as funding and other needs dictate. When is it appropriate to “make a call” on integrity and eligibility without full documentation? Are there legal ramifications or procedural improprieties in doing so?

Part II, “What’s New with the Old National Register,” goes beyond the basics of conducting historic building surveys and preparing National Register nominations. It focuses more on some of the nuances involved in both processes, things that can either trip you up or smooth your path to project completion. It also addresses recent issues and trends that have emerged either nationally or statewide, including using online resources for conducting “digital surveys” and conducting historical research.

Roger Roper is a Deputy SHPO and historic preservation program coordinator for the Utah Division of State History (Utah SHPO).

Cory Jensen is the National Register and architectural survey coordinator for the Utah Division of State History (Utah SHPO)..


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Seminar (Utah State Archives Training Room 346 S. Rio Grande St) (SEMINAR IS FULL)

Christina Epperson and Tessie Burningham

We will show you how to find our historical data-sets and map gallery, both available online. Participants will learn about different online resources for historical aerial imagery and learn steps to overlay a historical map onto Google Earth. Then we will give a brief introduction to a free mapping program called ArcGIS online and review the capabilities and resources available for historians.

Christina Epperson is GIS Analyst, Utah Division of State History
Tessie Burningham is Records Assistant with the Antiquities Section, Utah Division of State History


4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

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Workshop (Zephyr Room)
Elizabeth Hora-Cook and Deb Miller

The Utah Division of State History (UDSH) announces a new teacher training workshop as a part of the Utah State History Conference. This workshop will present a complete module that introduces students to Utah prehistory, develops evidence-based critical thinking skills, and embodies an important message about archaeological stewardship. As a part of UDSH’s mission to preserve and share the past, we designed a 90 minute module that can articulate with 4th and 7th grade social studies curriculums. The workshop will introduce teachers to Utah prehistory and provide instruction for how to use the teaching module. We will offer free materials during the training and direct educators to other online teaching resources.

Elizabeth Hora-Cook is Cultural Compliance Reviewer with the Antiquities Section, Utah Division of State History.
Deb Miller is GIS Specialist and Assistant Archaeology Records Manager, Utah Division of State History.

Rural Utah, Western Issues – 64th Annual Utah State History Conference Program

Online registration is now closed.  Walk in registrations will be accepted as space allows. 

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Conference at a Glance

Conference Workshops, Seminars
Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016
9:00 a.m. – noon
4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Rio Grande Depot
300 S. Rio Grande Street
Salt Lake City, UT

9:00 a.m. –  noon Introduction to Oral History (Zephyr Room) (WORKSHOP IS FULL)
(Co-sponsored by Utah Humanities)
9:00 a.m. –  noon Historic Preservation Workshop (West Lecture Room) (WORKSHOP IS FULL)
9:00 a.m. – noon Well, isn’t that Spatial?”: GIS, Mapping Historical and Cultural Resources (Utah State Archives Training Room – 346 S. Rio Grande Street) (WORKSHOP IS FULL)
4:00 p.m – 6:00 p.m. Teacher Training Prehistory Workshop (Zephyr Room)

 

Conference Panels, Sessions
Friday, Sept. 30, 2016
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Utah Cultural Celebration Center
1355 West 3100 South
West Valley, UT

9:00 – 10:15 a.m. Plenary Session: Historical Perspectives on the Public Lands Debate in the American WestDr. Gregory Smoak, Dr. Leisl Carr Childers, Dr. Joseph E. Taylor III (Great Hall)
10:30 – 11:45 a.m. World War I in Utah (Room 101)
Early Rural Utah in the Uinta Basin (Room 102)
  Evaluating The Awkward State of Utah (Room 104)
  Accessing Statewide Heritage Resources (Room 105)
  Bringing the Art of Decorative Paper Cutting into the Twenty-first Century (Board Room)
12 – 1:30 p.m. Keynote: Quicksand, Cactus, and the Power of History in Polarized Times: Bringing Juanita Brooks and Dale L. Morgan Back into Our ConversationDr. Patty Limerick (Great Hall)
1:45 – 3:00 p.m. What Role Do Historians Play in Public Land and Water Policy? (Rooms 101 & 102)
  New Methods, Historical Innovation (Room 104)
  Evolving Small Towns (Room 105)
  The Personal and the Political (Great Hall – west)
  Lark Public Event (Great Hall – east)
  Lark Oral Histories (Board Room)
3:15 – 4:30 p.m. Rural Utah, National Destinations (Rooms 101 & 102)
  Voices from the Desert: Rural Issues in Southeastern Utah (Room 104)
  Land Stewardship in Northern Utah (Room 105)
  Industrial and Natural Landscapes (Great Hall – west)
  Lark Public Event (Great Hall – east)
  Lark Oral Histories (Board Room)

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Conference Tour (TOUR IS FULL)
Saturday, Oct. 1, 2016
9:00 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Hosted by Fort Douglas Military Museum.   Battle or massacre? Historians still debate the events of that cold winter day in January 1863 when soldiers from Camp Douglas attacked a village of Shoshone on the Bear River near the Utah-Idaho border. Follow the route of the soldiers as the marched north from Camp Doulas and walk the site of the actual battle. An informative and thought provoking day exploring Utah’s historic past.

Cost:     $65 per person (includes transportation, lunch and field trip booklet)

**Please note that a separate paid registration is required for this tour and is not part of the free conference.  Please call 801-581-1251 or email admin@fortdouglas.org to register. (TOUR IS FULL, NO MORE REGISTRATIONS ARE BEING ACCEPTED)


Thank you to our conference sponsors:

American Institute of Architects (Utah chapter), American Planning Association (Utah chapter), American West Center (U of U), Ames Construction, Charles Redd Center for Western Studies (BYU), Chevron, Fort Douglas Military Museum, Governor’s Office of Economic Development, J. Willard Marriott Library (U of U), LDS Church History Department, National Park Service, Resonance Printing Solutions, U of U History Department, USU History Department, Utah Cultural Celebration Center, Utah Humanities, Utah Westerners.

Utah State Historical Society Best Book and Article Nominations

Published in 2015, awarded at 2016 Annual Meeting

 

Nominations for the Francis Armstrong Madsen Best Utah History Book Award

Thomas Carter, Building Zion: The Material World of Mormon Settlement (University of Minnesota Press)

Richard Francaviglia, The Mapmakers of New Zion: A Cartographic History of Mormonism (University of Utah Press)

Dave Hall, A Faded Legacy: Amy Brown Lyman and Mormon Women’s Activism, 1872-1959 (University of Utah Press)

Michael Hicks, The Mormon Tabernacle Choir: A Biography (University of Illinois Press)

Robert S. McPherson, Life in a Corner: Cultural Episodes in Southeastern Utah, 1880-1950 (University of Oklahoma)

Charles S. Peterson and Brian Q. Cannon, The Awkward State of Utah: Coming of Age in the Nation, 1896-1945 (University of Utah Press)

Paul Reeve, Religion of a Different Color: Race and the Mormon Struggle for Whiteness (Oxford University Press)

 

Nominations for Best Utah Historical Quarterly Article Awards (Dale L. Morgan Award for Best Scholarly Article and Charles Redd Center for Western Studies Award for Best General Interest Article)

Winter 2015

Robert E. Parson, “Neither Poet nor Prophet: S. George Ellsworth and the History of Utah”

Douglas H. Page Jr., Sarah E. Page, Thomas J. Straka, and Nathan D. Thomas, “Charcoal and Its Role in Utah Mining History”

Kathryn L. MacKay, “The Chocolate Dippers’ Strike of 1910”

Emma Louise Penrod, “Tooele, Touch Typing, and the Catholic Saint Marguerite-Marie Alacoque”

Gary Topping, “Transformation of the Cathedral: An Interview with Gregory Glenn”

Spring 2015

Bruce W. Worthen, “‘Zachary Taylor Is Dead and in Hell and I Am Glad of It!’: The Political Intrigues of Almon Babbitt”

Steve Siporin, “A Bear and a Bandit”

Chase Chamberlain and Robert S. McPherson, “Desert Cold Warriors: Southeastern Utah’s Fight against Communism, 1951–1981”

Summer 2015

Marshall E. Bowen, “The Russian Molokans of Park Valley”

Kathryn L. MacKay, “The Uncompahgre Reservation and the Hill Creek Extension”

Christine Cooper-Rompato, “Women Inventors in Utah Territory”

Fall 2015

Alexander L. Baugh, “John C. Frémont’s 1843–44 Western Expedition and Its Influence on Mormon Settlement in Utah”

Ephriam D. Dickson III, “‘Shadowy Figures about Whom Little Is Known’: Artists of the Simpson Expedition, 1858–59”

Susan Rhoades Neel, “Love among the Fossils: Earl and Pearl Douglass at Dinosaur National Monument”

 

Nominations for Best Article on Utah History Not Published in the Utah Historical Quarterly (Suitter Axland Award)

Thomas Alexander, “Brigham Young and the Transformation of Utah Wilderness, 1847–58,” Journal of Mormon History 41, no. 1 (2015): 103–24.

Nancy Stowe Kadar, “The Young Democrats and Hugh Nibley at BYU,” Journal of Mormon History 41, no. 4 (2015): 43–73.

David Rich Lewis, “Skull Valley Goshutes and the Politics of Place, Identity, and Sovereignty in Rural Utah,” in David B. Danbom, ed., Bridging the Distance: Common Issues of the Rural West (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 2015), 239–76.

Benjamin Lindquist, “Testimony of the Senses: Latter-day Saints and the Civilized Soundscape,” Western Historical Quarterly 46, no. 1 (2015): 53–74.

Michael R. Polk, “Interpreting Chinese Worker Camps on the Transcontinental Railroad at Promontory Summit, Utah,” Historical Archaeology 49, no. 1 (2015).

Samuel A. Smith, “The Cities of Zion? Mormon and non-Mormon town plans in the U.S. Mountain West, 1847–1930,” Journal of Historical Geography (October 2015).

 

State History – Annual Themes

Bingham_Canyon_UtahThese annual statewide themes are vetted two years in advanced by the Utah Division of State History, the Utah State Historical Society, and the editorial staff of the Utah Historical Quarterly. If you would like to recommend an annual theme, please do so by writing to statehistory@utah.gov.

The annual theme is used for our annual statewide history conference (usually held in the fall).

Themes are based on noteworthy Utah anniversaries, public history trends, and new and emerging areas of historical interest. State History highly encourages that county, local and regional historical agencies, programs, repositories and societies join us in offering conferences and programs that follow these annual themes. “Preservation and Antiquities” month events also align with the annual themes.

2016 – Rural Utah and Western Issues

2017 – Local Matters

2018 – Transportation and the Utah Landscape (We will celebrate the 150th anniversaries of both the transcontinental railroad and John Wesley Powell’s exploration of the Colorado River.)

2019 – Utah’s Archaeological Past

2020 – Water and the Utah Environment

2015 State History Conference Podcasts

Missed out on the 2015 State History Conference “Deep Roots, Many Voices”? Below are sessions that were recorded.

Documenting the Topaz Experience

  • Kimberly M. Jew (chair)
    Scotti Hill: When Words Weren’t Enough: Curating the Topaz Museum’s Inaugural Art Exhibition
  • Jane Beckwith: A Founders View, Topaz Museum
  • Christian Heimburger: “We Have Come to Understand Them, and We Admit We Need Them”: Japanese American Laborers in the Interior West, 1942-1944

Exploring Utah’s Multicultural Past through Oral History

  • Jodi Graham (chair)
  • Randy Williams: Cache Valley Refugee Voices
  • Deborah M. George: Root Sounds: The Utah African American Experience in Ogden
  • Sarah Singh: Twenty-fifth Street: The City That Never Slept

Immigration in Early Twentieth-Century Utah

  • John Sillito (chair)
  • Brian Whitney and Lorrie Rands: Immigrants at the Crossroads: An Oral History of Immigration into Ogden, Utah
  • Eileen Hallet Stone: Utah’s Jewish Agrarian Pioneers
  • Rochelle Kaplan: Jews in Utah: Not an Oxymoron!

Paiutes and the Circleville Massacre after 150 Years

  • Panel: Richard Turley (chair), Suzanne Catharine, Dorina Martineau, Sue Jensen Weeks, and Albert Winkler

Politics and Religious Authority

  • Greg Thompson (chair)
  • Gary Bergera: Ezra Taft Benson Meets Nikita Khrushchev, 1959: Memory Embellished
  • Kenneth L Cannon II and Geoffrey E. Cannon: Separation of Prophet and State? The 1914 Reelection of Reed Smoot
  • Jason Friedman: “Unless the ‘Saints’ decorate my personage with plumage and ‘something to make it stick’”: Duncan McMillan and the fight for Wasatch Academy

The Power of Oral History: Uncovering the Stories of Latino/as in Utah

  • Panel: Matt Basso (chair), Jennifer Macias, Juan Jose Garcia, Andrea Garavito Martinez

Two Changing Faces of Fundamentalist Mormonism: Rulon and Warren Jeffs

  • Craig L. Foster and Newell G. Bringhurst: Two Changing Faces of Fundamentalist Mormonism: Rulon and Warren Jeffs

 

2016 Annual State History Conference

Rural Utah, Western Issues

September 29 – October 1, 2016

Although Utah and the American West are highly urbanized—principally a product of arid geography—some of their defining characteristics are open spaces and sparse populations. Outside of its urban corridors, the West is a region of small towns and scattered homes amid a big landscape. Its history is a mosaic of agriculture, ranching, manufacturing, community life, and culture. Unfortunately, it is also sometimes ignored in the wider histories.

One of the biggest and most recognizable of western landscapes is Utah’s—the expansive range of the Great Basin, the peaks of the Central Rockies, and the canyons of the Colorado Plateau. Approximately 97 percent of Utah’s land area is considered rural. But this is not an unpeopled and unstoried landscape. About one in ten Utahns lives in towns of 2,500 people or less.

Rural Utahns have grappled with economic development, the dynamics of in-migration, rural gentrification, and the retention of rural culture and identity. Land and resource issues—federal ownership of vast tracts of locally used land, scarcity of water, and energy development among them—are also common, as they are in the histories of other western states. This conference seeks to examine the historical dimensions of these issues, highlighting new, revised, or heretofore unknown histories of rural and western life for a twenty-first century public.

Online registration is now closed.  Walk-in registrations will be accepted as space allows. 

CONFERENCE SCHEDULE OVERVIEW

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Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016
8:00 am – 6:00 pm
Workshops
Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City

Friday, Sept. 30, 2016
8:00 am – 5:00 pm
Plenary, lunchtime keynote and awards presentation, history and panel sessions
Keynote by Dr. Patty Limerick, Faculty Director and Chair of the Board of the Center of the American West at the University of Colorado, where she is also a Professor of History.
Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 West 3100 South, West Valley

Saturday, October 1, 2016
9:00 am – 6:30 pm
Tour to Bear River Massacre Site (TOUR IS FULL)
Tour sponsored by the Fort Douglas Military Museum
** Please note that a separate paid registration fee of $65.00 is required for this conference tour.  Registration is available at 801-581-1251 or fortdouglas.org.

Thank you to our conference sponsors:

American Institute of Architects (Utah chapter), American Planning Association (Utah chapter), American West Center (U of U), Ames Construction, Charles Redd Center for Western Studies (BYU), Chevron, Fort Douglas Military Museum, Governor’s Office of Economic Development, J. Willard Marriott Library (U of U), LDS Church History Department, National Park Service, Resonance Printing Solutions, U of U History Department, USU History Department, Utah Cultural Celebration Center, Utah Humanities, Utah Westerners.

 Nominations for USHS Best Utah History Book and Article Awards

2015 Annual Utah State History Conference

Deep Roots, Many Voices: Exploring Utah’s Multicultural Past

Utah is – and always has been – an eclectic mix of peoples and communities. Join us on October 2nd at the Utah Cultural Celebration Center for a free conference full of workshops, history sessions, panels and documentaries on the theme of multicultural diversity. Lunch is included on October 2nd.  Workshops and tours will also be held in conjunction with the conference (please see below for details and dates).

Utah’s history is enriched by the study of a host of peoples, experiences, and voices. The histories of ethnicity, gender, work, and family, from the perspective of ordinary people, do more than pepper diversity in Utah history: they fundamentally change and enhance our understanding of the state and its past. These histories are ones of empowerment, creativity, and survival, as well as conquest, dispossession, and prejudice.

Sorry, conference registration is now closed.  Walk-ins will be accepted as space allows.  We will be recording many of the sessions, which will be available on our website in mid October.

Tour registrations are still being accepted (see links below)

Conference Overview Schedule

October 1, 2015
Workshops (click here for schedule)
Rio Grande Depot
300 S. Rio Grande Street
Salt Lake City, UT
October 2, 2015
History Sessions (click here for schedule)
Lunch and Keynote
Utah Cultural Celebration Center
1355 West 3100 South
West Valley City, UT
 .
October 3, 2105
Tour of Iosepa (click here for schedule)
Separate paid registration is required!
Registration is now available!
October 10, 2015
Tour of Topaz (click here for schedule)
Separate paid registration is required!
Registration is now available!

 

For questions, please contact Alycia Aldrich at statehistory.utah.gov or 801-245-7226

Thank you to our conference sponsors:  W.W. Clyde and Co., American West Center, Ames Construction, Chevron, Charles Redd Center for Western Studies, Fort Douglas Military Museum, J. Willard Marriott Library, Utah Westerners, Utah Humanities, University of Utah Department of History, National Park Service, and Utah Department of Heritage & Arts.

October 2, 2105 12:00 Lunch and Awards Program
Keynote Speaker Pamela S. Perlich, “Utah’s Hidden Diversity: Decoding Evidence from the Census”

September 2015 Brown Bags
Please join us at Utah State Archives for five fascinating discussions in September as we prepare for our annual conference (“Deep Roots, Many Voices: Exploring Utah’s Multicultural Past”) on October 2nd. The first four brown bags begin at 12 noon. (ONLY the Sept. 30th will begin at 1 p.m.)  Bring your friends and your lunch!

______________

October 2, 2015

Registration 7:45 – 8:45 am

8:45 am – 5:00 p.m. History Sessions

12:00 Lunch Program – History Awards and Keynote

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Conference at a Glance

Paper abstracts and presenter biographies can be accessed by clicking on the session below.

8:45 – 10:15 a.m. 10:30 – 11:45 a.m. 1:45 – 3:15 p.m. 3:30 – 5:00 p.m.
The Breadth of Regional History: The Case of Southeastern Utah (panel) (Room 101) Rediscovering Utah’s Native Voices (Room 101) Paiutes and the Circleville Massacre after 150 Years (panel) (Room 101) Religion and Race: Evaluating Religion of a Different Color: Race and the Mormon Struggle for Whiteness (panel) (Room 101)
What Paleontological, Perishable, and Coprolite Remains Tell Us About Past Cultures (Room 102) Under-documented Communities in Utah: Iosepa & Chinese Railroad Workers (panel) (Room 102) Pitching Tents and Breaking Trail: Three Historians Afield with the Utah War (Room 102) Diversity and Sport (Room 102)
Engaging Minorities and Making Room (Room 104) Disability Rights Movement in Utah and the Nation (panel) (Room 104) Immigration in Early Twentieth-Century Utah (Room 104) Two Changing Faces of Fundamentalist Mormonism (Room 104)
Politics and Religious Authority (Room 105) Documenting the Topaz Experience (Room 105) Many Voices in Utah History (Room 105) Native-White Interaction in Nineteenth-Century Utah (Room 105)
The Power of Oral History: Uncovering the Stories of Latino/as in Utah (panel) (Suite A) Latino Voices in Cache Valley (panel) (Suite A) Exploring Utah’s Multicultural Past through Oral History (panel) (Suite A)
Magna: An American Story (documentary) (Suite B) Splinters of a Nation: The Story of German Prisoners of War in Utah (documentary/panel) (Suite B) 1:45-3:15 — The Twelve Left Behind (documentary)
Speaking with Bishop John Wester (documentary)(Suite B)
Utah’s Polynesian History (panel) (Suite B)

Conference Session Descriptions

8:45 a.m. – 10:15 a.m. Track

The Breadth of Regional History: The Case of Southeastern Utah (Room 101)

  • Panel: Robert McPherson (chair), Floyd O’Neill, Allan Kent Powell, and Gary Topping

What Paleontological, Perishable, and Coprolite Remains Tell Us About Past Cultures (Room 102)

  • Lori Hunsaker (chair)
  • Daniel King: Jurassic Jones: The Archaeology of Paleontology
  • Joseph Bryce: Marks in the Clay: Impressions and What They Tell Us
  • Madison N. M. Pearce: Prehistoric Diets and Medicines of the Utah Great Basin: Using Ethnohistory to Explore Botanical Remains From Spotten Cave Human Coprolites

Engaging Minorities and Making Room (Room 104)

  • Elizabeth Heath (chair)
  • Lloyd S. Pendleton: Utah’s Ten Year Plan to End Chronic Homelessness
  • Gerrit van Dyk and Jeremy Ingersoll: Their Hispanic Heritage: The Preservation of Different Cultures in LDS Spanish-speaking Congregations

Politics and Religious Authority (Room 105)

  • Greg Thompson (chair)
  • Gary Bergera: Ezra Taft Benson Meets Nikita Khrushchev, 1959: Memory Embellished
  • Kenneth L Cannon II and Geoffrey E. Cannon: Separation of Prophet and State? The 1914 Reelection of Reed Smoot
  • Jason Friedman: “Unless the ‘Saints’ decorate my personage with plumage and ‘something to make it stick’”: Duncan McMillan and the fight for Wasatch Academy

Magna: An American Story (documentary) (Suite B)

  • Patricia Hull (chair) and Robert K. Avery

10:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. Track

Rediscovering Utah’s Native Voices (Room 101) AWC_50th_Logo_Color

  • Panel: Shirlee Silversmith (chair), Richard Turley, Brent Rogers, Gregory Smoak, Shoshone and Ute Native speakers

 

Under-documented Communities in Utah: Iosepa and Chinese Railroad Workers (Room 102) 

  • Panel: Benjamin Pykles (moderator), Anne Oliver, Sheri Murray-Ellis, and Ken Cannonadmin-ajax1
  • This session is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service

 

Disability Rights Movement in Utah and the Nation (Room 104)

  • Panel: Claire Mantonya (chair), Marilyn Bown, Sherry L. Repscher, and Barbara Toomer

Documenting the Topaz Experience (Room 105)

  • Kimberly M. Jew (chair)
    Scotti Hill: When Words Weren’t Enough: Curating the Topaz Museum’s Inaugural Art Exhibition
  • Jane Beckwith: A Founders View, Topaz Museum
  • Christian Heimburger: “We Have Come to Understand Them, and We Admit We Need Them”: Japanese American Laborers in the Interior West, 1942-1944

The Power of Oral History: Uncovering the Stories of Latino/as in Utah (Suite A) Redd Logo

  • Panel: Matt Basso (chair), Jennifer Macias, Juan Jose Garcia, Andrea Garavito Martinez

 

 

Splinters of a Nation: The Story of German Prisoners of War in Utah (documentary/panel) (Suite B)

  • Panel: Scott Porter, Allan Kent Powell

12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Lunch Program

Welcome: Gregory C. Thompson, Chair, Board of State History

Update on Division of State History: Brad Westwood, Director, Division of State History

2015 Annual Utah State History Awards: Gregory C. Thompson and Brad Westwood

Introduction of Dr. Pam Perlich: Dina Blaes, Vice-Chair, Board of State History

Keynote: Dr. Pam Perlich: Utah’s Hidden Diversity: Decoding Evidence from the Census

1:45 p.m. – 3:15 p.m. Track

Paiutes and the Circleville Massacre after 150 Years (Room 101) Westerners

  • Panel: Richard E. Turley Jr. (chair), Suzanne Catharine, Edward Leo Lyman, Albert Winkler

 

Pitching Tents and Breaking Trail: Three Historians Afield with the Utah War (Room 102) 

  • Ken Gallacher (chair)
  • Kenneth L. Alford (paper to be presented by William P. MacKinnon): “And a Bitter Experience It fortudougWas”: The Utah War and the 1858 Move South
  • James F. Martin: “Sibleys amongst the Snow”: Locating Old Camp Scott
  • William P. MacKinnon: Summing Up the Utah War: One Historian’s Twenty-first Century Conclusions

Immigration in Early Twentieth-Century Utah (Room 104)

  • John Sillito (chair)
  • Brian Whitney and Lorrie Rands: Immigrants at the Crossroads: An Oral History of Immigration into Ogden, Utah
  • Eileen Hallet Stone: Utah’s Jewish Agrarian Pioneers
  • Rochelle Kaplan: Jews in Utah: Not an Oxymoron!

Many Voices in Utah History (Room 105)

  • Colleen Whitley (chair)
  • Allen Dale Roberts: British Influence on Pioneer Utah’s Greek and Gothic Revival
  • David A. Hales and Sandra Dawn Brimhall: You’re a Woman. You Can’t Be a Certified Public Accountant: The Trials and Struggles of Hannah Claire Haines, Utah’s First Woman CPA and Prominent Business Woman
  • J. Seth Anderson:  “We’re Here, We’re Queer, We’re Fabulous, Get Used to Us!”: Queer Nation Utah, 1991-1992

Latino Voices in Cache Valley (Suite A)

  • Panel: Brad Cole (chair), Randy Williams, Eduardo Ortiz, Maria Luisa Spicer-Escalante

The Twelve Left Behind (documentary)
Speaking with Bishop John Wester (documentary) (Suite B)

  • Desk Top History’s film short “The Twelve Left Behind,” the story of Italian prisoners of war during World War II, produced by Kelly Nelson

3:30 – 5:00 p.m.

Religion and Race: Evaluating Religion of a Different Color: Race and the Mormon Struggle for Whiteness (Room 101)

  • Panel: Brad Westwood (chair), Martha Evans Bradley, David Rich Lewis, W. Paul Reeve, and LaShawn Williams-Schultz

Diversity and Sport (Room 102)

  • Richard Kimball (chair)
  • Joseph Soderborg: Wicket Mormons and Cricket Gentiles: Cultural Imperialism in Utah’s Sporting Past
  • Intermountain Cricket League Exhibition

Two Changing Faces of Fundamentalist Mormonism (Room 104)

  • Newell G. Bringhurst: The Transformation of Rulon Timpson Jeffs: From Devout Mormon to FLDS Prophet
  • Craig L. Foster: “Proclamations and Prophecies from a Prison Cell: How Warren Jeffs Continues to Control the FLDS

Native-White Interaction in Nineteenth-Century Utah (Room 105)

  • David Grua (chair)
  • Wendy Simmons Johnson: An Underground Store, the Skull Valley Goshute, and Red Ink: Contact Period in Rush Valley
  • Hadyn B. Call: Kidnapped and Purchased: Piecing Together the Story of Ruth Piede Call Davids—a Paiute Indian
  • Jim Keyes: Showdown in the Canyons: History of Interaction between Early Cattle Ranchers and Native Americans in Southeastern Utah.

Exploring Utah’s Multicultural Past through Oral History (Suite A)

  • Jodi Graham (chair)
  • Randy Williams: Cache Valley Refugee Voices
  • Deborah M. George: Root Sounds: The Utah African American Experience in Ogden
  • Sarah Singh: Twenty-fifth Street: The City That Never Slept

Utah’s Polynesian History (Suite B)

  • Panel: Philip Notarianni (chair), Jake Fitisemanu Jr., Ulysses Thomas Tongaoneval, Susi Feitch-Malohifo’ou, and others