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Utah Drawn: An Exhibition of Rare Maps

We are pleased to announce an exhibition of forty rare historical maps depicting the region that became Utah from its earliest imaginings by European cartographers to the modern state’s boundaries.

Original maps shown are from the private collection of Salt Lake City businessman Stephen Boulay, with additional contributions from the Utah State Historical Society, LDS Church History Department, L. Tom Perry Special Collections at Brigham Young University, Special Collections at the J. Willard Marriott Library, and the American West Center at the University of Utah.

The exhibition is curated by Travis Ross and Stephen Boulay. Exhibition designer is Kerry Shaw. See here for other contributors and exhibition partners.

The exhibition will run through mid October 2017.

For an online interactive map detailing the shifting political and cultural boundaries of Utah, see Contested Boundaries: Creating Utah’s State Lines.

Educational Aids are available for teachers and their students to enjoy and learn from the exhibit.

Here is an introductory lesson to help students to observe the features on each map. You can use the maps available below for this exercise.

A visit to the Capitol for the second lesson, which can include the Scavenger Hunt activity to help students be engaged with the maps.

The final lesson entails students presenting what they have learned during the exercises. You can find more resources on map analysis from the Library of Congress. We also provide a brief description of the Public Land Survey System used to divide up land ownership in the Utah.


UHQ Digital Exhibition

The six maps reproduced below are part of Utah Drawn: An Exhibition of Rare Maps displayed in the Utah Capitol Building fourth floor beginning January 27, 2017.

Maps serve many purposes. They represent physical geographies, recording landmarks, routes, and boundaries. But they also reflect varying perceptions, imaginations, values, and aspirations. This is certainly true of the maps presented here. Over five centuries, empires and explorers along with printers and publishers worked first to trace the outline of a continent that was new to Europeans and then, eventually, to fill in its vast middle. These maps show the steady increase of geographic knowledge of the Americas, but they also demonstrate the economic and political interests that produced that knowledge and the individuals who benefited from it. They hint at what map makers and their sponsors determined was worth documenting, identifying, and, in some cases, possessing. They often erase, obscure, and distort. Put simply: maps are more than cartographic representations of known or imagined physical features on the landscape. As you examine these maps, try to determine the purposes for which they were made and any mistruths, omissions, and distortions they may contain.


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Title: America Septentrionalis

Creator: Jan Jansson (1588-1664)

Published in: Nouveau Theatre du Monde ou Nouvel Atlas

Place: Amsterdam

Date: 1641

This striking hand-colored map by the Dutch cartographer Jan Jansson (1588-1664) was the first atlas map to treat North America on its own page, separate from the rest of the western hemisphere. Jansson produced this definitive synthesis of the best cartographic knowledge then available. In the process, he helped to canonize both true and false details about North America’s geography for generations. This was not the first map to depict California as an island, for instance, but its widespread distribution helped to popularize that misconception. The eastern seaboard illustrates the French presence along the St. Lawrence River, the English in New England and Virginia, and the Dutch in what is labeled “Novum Belgium.” Though the lake feeding the Rio Del Norte might look familiar to modern Utahns, the Great Salt Lake did not enter the written record until the Timpanogos Utes related its existence to the Dominguez-Escalanté Expedition of 1776.


 

miera-plano-geografico-de-los-descumbimientos

Title: “Plano Geografico de los Descumbimientos”

Creator: Bernardo de Miera y Pacheco (1713-1785)

Manuscript (Original at Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University)

Date: 1778 (Facsimile, 1970)

Bernardo de Miera y Pacheco (1713-1785) traveled with the Dominguez-Escalante Expedition of 1776-1777 and drew this map as a record of the journey. The party served the Spanish interest in establishing an overland route connecting Mexico to Alta California, which remained an overseas colony of New Spain in spite of its relative geographic proximity well into the next century. In this map, Miera depicted the Rio Colorado with new clarity. This map depicted “Laguna de los Timpanogos” (Utah Lake) for the first time. It also illustrates the “Great River of the West,” a mythical river that tantalized those hoping to find a water passage to Asia for nearly two hundred years. Contrary to later maps, this conflation of Utah’s modern Green River and Sevier River terminated in a lake within the Great Basin. Miera named it Laguna de Miera after himself, but modern Utahns will know it as Sevier Lake.


 

vandermaelen-partie-du-mexique-full

Title: “Partie du Mexique”

Creator: Philippe Vandermaelen (1795-1869)

Published in: Atlas Universel de Géographie Physique, Politique, Statistique Et Minéralogique

Date: 1827

Drawn by the Belgian cartographer Philippe Marie Vandermaelen (1795-1869), this map depicted the region from Lake Timpanogos (Utah Lake) to present day Colorado and Wyoming. It appeared in Vandermaelen’s six-volume Atlas Universel, published in 1827. As the first atlas to depict the entire globe with a large, consistent scale (26 miles to the inch), the individual maps in this atlas could be combined on a globe approximately 7.75 meters in diameter. The Princeton University Library’s has rendered the resulting globe digitally. The fourth volume focused on North America, he illustrated the Trans-Mississippi West in about twenty sheets.


 

UTA_Garrett_00333, Mon Oct 08, 2007, 1:57:07 PM, 8C, 8424x7804, (1998+2895), 150%, bent 6 stops, 1/25 s, R70.7, G66.9, B86.1

UTA_Garrett_00333, Mon Oct 08, 2007, 1:57:07 PM, 8C, 8424x7804, (1998+2895), 150%, bent 6 stops, 1/25 s, R70.7, G66.9, B86.1

Title: “Neueste Karte von Mexico … 1850”

Creator: Carl Christian Franz Radefeld (1788-1874)

Published in: Joseph Meyer (1796-1856), Grosser Hand-Atlas

Place: Hildburghausen

Date: 1850

Even if the U.S. government never recognized the expansive state of Deseret, the prolific mapmakers at Meyer’s publishing company Bibliographisches Institut in Hildburghausen, Germany did, if only briefly. Like Young’s map of Deseret in Mitchell’s Universal Atlas, Meyer’s Grosser Hand-Atlas published a rare map of Deseret as originally proposed. That was not a coincidence. Meyer and his cartographer Radefeld relied on Mitchell’s atlas to produce their 1850-1854 editions of the Hand-Atlas.


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Title: “Map of the United States of America”

Creator: James H. Young (1792-18??)

Published in: Samuel Augustus Mitchell (1792-1868), A New Universal Atlas

Place: Philadelphia

Date: 1850

Fueled by emerging mass-market interest, atlases experienced a resurgence in popularity in the 1840s and 1850s. Produced for S. Augustus Mitchell’s contribution to that market by his longtime engraver and associate James H. Young, this map captured the territorial expansion of the newly-continental United States in progress. While the eastern United States might look relatively familiar—save the lack of West Virginia as a distinct state—the western territories bear only a vague similarity to the familiar state boundaries that would eventually settle. This map captured an already-reduced Utah Territory that stretched from roughly the Sierra Nevada range to the continental divide.

Note that the map erroneously called that territory by its then-defunct name of Deseret. This particular mid-1850 edition of the atlas had two U.S. maps, with each identifying the new territory by its alternate names. The United States never recognized an entity called “Deseret.” Western political events moved rather quickly at times, so it is understandable that a map prepared in early 1850 and published at the end of the year would not be able to keep up. Nonetheless, the territory which should have been labeled Utah Territory never looked like this.


mitchell-oregon-and-upper-california-full

 

mitchell-oregon-and-upper-california-inset

Title: “California, Oregon, Washington, Utah, New Mexico”

Creator: Samuel Augustus Mitchell (1792-1868)

Published in: A New Universal Atlas

Publisher: Charles Desilver

Place: Philadelphia

Date: 1857

Selling atlases in the mass market was a race as often as it was a contest over accuracy and comprehensiveness. Produced rapidly for Mitchell’s Atlas Universal in 1850 by adding new boundaries to an existing base map from the previous decade, this was one of the first maps to show the new state of California. It had little else going for it. Its intellectual debt to the 1840s meant that Frémont practically authored the Great Basin. The map even identified it as the Fremont Basin to at least the 1855 edition. Over the 1850s, Mitchell updated the map, adding in subsequent editions the cities and counties that had been conspicuously absent in the rushed earlier versions.

 


 

 

 

Waterpocket Fold and Greater Capitol Reef

The Waterpocket Fold and Greater Capitol Reef
Friday, November 20, 4:00 p.m.
The Downtown City Library, 4th Floor, Room 4
210 East 400 South, Salt Lake City, Utah

WaterpocketFoldThe Waterpocket Fold stretches like a reptilian spine across one hundred miles of broken desert lands along the western edge of the Colorado Plateau. This event will reflect on this landmark geologic formation—centerpiece of Capitol Reef National Park—its history, and the broader landscape surrounding the Fold.

Ralph Becker, currently mayor Salt Lake City, completed a 176-mile hike along the entire length of the Fold as a young man. Since then, he has explored by vehicle, bike, boat, and foot the region around Capitol Reef National Park—including the treasures of Boulder Mountain, the Henry Mountains, Thousand Lakes Mountain, the side canyons of the Dirty Devil River, and the wilderness of the Escalante. In this presentation, he will tell the story of his Waterpocket Fold trek and look back on changes in the Capitol Reef region in the intervening years. Becker’s diary of his Waterpocket Fold trek appears in the fall 2015 issue of the Utah Historical Quarterly.

Stephen Trimble, writer, photographer and naturalist, was a ranger at Capitol Reef in 1975 and has been writing and photographing in the park and surrounding canyon country ever since. He’ll place Becker’s journal in the context of our creative response to the Waterpocket Fold over 150 years. Trimble has published twenty-two books on western landscape and native peoples. He’s beginning to gather pieces for “The Capitol Reef Reader,” which he’ll edit for the University of Utah Press. Trimble makes his home in Salt Lake City and in Torrey, Utah.

Free and Open to the Public

Part of a regular series of lectures highlighting the work and scholarship of Utah Historical Quarterly, Utah’s official historical journal. This is part of a continuing series of interviews and events featuring current state leaders in their intersections with Utah history.

Mignon Barker Richmond Audio Links

Introduction to Mignon Barker Richmond

After graduating from Utah State University

Richmond’s giving spirit

Work with the Central City Community Center

2015 Annual Utah State History Conference

Deep Roots, Many Voices: Exploring Utah’s Multicultural Past

Utah is – and always has been – an eclectic mix of peoples and communities. Join us on October 2nd at the Utah Cultural Celebration Center for a free conference full of workshops, history sessions, panels and documentaries on the theme of multicultural diversity. Lunch is included on October 2nd.  Workshops and tours will also be held in conjunction with the conference (please see below for details and dates).

Utah’s history is enriched by the study of a host of peoples, experiences, and voices. The histories of ethnicity, gender, work, and family, from the perspective of ordinary people, do more than pepper diversity in Utah history: they fundamentally change and enhance our understanding of the state and its past. These histories are ones of empowerment, creativity, and survival, as well as conquest, dispossession, and prejudice.

Sorry, conference registration is now closed.  Walk-ins will be accepted as space allows.  We will be recording many of the sessions, which will be available on our website in mid October.

Tour registrations are still being accepted (see links below)

Conference Overview Schedule

October 1, 2015
Workshops (click here for schedule)
Rio Grande Depot
300 S. Rio Grande Street
Salt Lake City, UT
October 2, 2015
History Sessions (click here for schedule)
Lunch and Keynote
Utah Cultural Celebration Center
1355 West 3100 South
West Valley City, UT
 .
October 3, 2105
Tour of Iosepa (click here for schedule)
Separate paid registration is required!
Registration is now available!
October 10, 2015
Tour of Topaz (click here for schedule)
Separate paid registration is required!
Registration is now available!

 

For questions, please contact Alycia Aldrich at statehistory.utah.gov or 801-245-7226

Thank you to our conference sponsors:  W.W. Clyde and Co., American West Center, Ames Construction, Chevron, Charles Redd Center for Western Studies, Fort Douglas Military Museum, J. Willard Marriott Library, Utah Westerners, Utah Humanities, University of Utah Department of History, National Park Service, and Utah Department of Heritage & Arts.

October 2, 2105 12:00 Lunch and Awards Program
Keynote Speaker Pamela S. Perlich, “Utah’s Hidden Diversity: Decoding Evidence from the Census”

September 2015 Brown Bags
Please join us at Utah State Archives for five fascinating discussions in September as we prepare for our annual conference (“Deep Roots, Many Voices: Exploring Utah’s Multicultural Past”) on October 2nd. The first four brown bags begin at 12 noon. (ONLY the Sept. 30th will begin at 1 p.m.)  Bring your friends and your lunch!

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October 2, 2015

Registration 7:45 – 8:45 am

8:45 am – 5:00 p.m. History Sessions

12:00 Lunch Program – History Awards and Keynote

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Conference at a Glance

Paper abstracts and presenter biographies can be accessed by clicking on the session below.

8:45 – 10:15 a.m. 10:30 – 11:45 a.m. 1:45 – 3:15 p.m. 3:30 – 5:00 p.m.
The Breadth of Regional History: The Case of Southeastern Utah (panel) (Room 101) Rediscovering Utah’s Native Voices (Room 101) Paiutes and the Circleville Massacre after 150 Years (panel) (Room 101) Religion and Race: Evaluating Religion of a Different Color: Race and the Mormon Struggle for Whiteness (panel) (Room 101)
What Paleontological, Perishable, and Coprolite Remains Tell Us About Past Cultures (Room 102) Under-documented Communities in Utah: Iosepa & Chinese Railroad Workers (panel) (Room 102) Pitching Tents and Breaking Trail: Three Historians Afield with the Utah War (Room 102) Diversity and Sport (Room 102)
Engaging Minorities and Making Room (Room 104) Disability Rights Movement in Utah and the Nation (panel) (Room 104) Immigration in Early Twentieth-Century Utah (Room 104) Two Changing Faces of Fundamentalist Mormonism (Room 104)
Politics and Religious Authority (Room 105) Documenting the Topaz Experience (Room 105) Many Voices in Utah History (Room 105) Native-White Interaction in Nineteenth-Century Utah (Room 105)
The Power of Oral History: Uncovering the Stories of Latino/as in Utah (panel) (Suite A) Latino Voices in Cache Valley (panel) (Suite A) Exploring Utah’s Multicultural Past through Oral History (panel) (Suite A)
Magna: An American Story (documentary) (Suite B) Splinters of a Nation: The Story of German Prisoners of War in Utah (documentary/panel) (Suite B) 1:45-3:15 — The Twelve Left Behind (documentary)
Speaking with Bishop John Wester (documentary)(Suite B)
Utah’s Polynesian History (panel) (Suite B)

Conference Session Descriptions

8:45 a.m. – 10:15 a.m. Track

The Breadth of Regional History: The Case of Southeastern Utah (Room 101)

  • Panel: Robert McPherson (chair), Floyd O’Neill, Allan Kent Powell, and Gary Topping

What Paleontological, Perishable, and Coprolite Remains Tell Us About Past Cultures (Room 102)

  • Lori Hunsaker (chair)
  • Daniel King: Jurassic Jones: The Archaeology of Paleontology
  • Joseph Bryce: Marks in the Clay: Impressions and What They Tell Us
  • Madison N. M. Pearce: Prehistoric Diets and Medicines of the Utah Great Basin: Using Ethnohistory to Explore Botanical Remains From Spotten Cave Human Coprolites

Engaging Minorities and Making Room (Room 104)

  • Elizabeth Heath (chair)
  • Lloyd S. Pendleton: Utah’s Ten Year Plan to End Chronic Homelessness
  • Gerrit van Dyk and Jeremy Ingersoll: Their Hispanic Heritage: The Preservation of Different Cultures in LDS Spanish-speaking Congregations

Politics and Religious Authority (Room 105)

  • Greg Thompson (chair)
  • Gary Bergera: Ezra Taft Benson Meets Nikita Khrushchev, 1959: Memory Embellished
  • Kenneth L Cannon II and Geoffrey E. Cannon: Separation of Prophet and State? The 1914 Reelection of Reed Smoot
  • Jason Friedman: “Unless the ‘Saints’ decorate my personage with plumage and ‘something to make it stick’”: Duncan McMillan and the fight for Wasatch Academy

Magna: An American Story (documentary) (Suite B)

  • Patricia Hull (chair) and Robert K. Avery

10:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. Track

Rediscovering Utah’s Native Voices (Room 101) AWC_50th_Logo_Color

  • Panel: Shirlee Silversmith (chair), Richard Turley, Brent Rogers, Gregory Smoak, Shoshone and Ute Native speakers

 

Under-documented Communities in Utah: Iosepa and Chinese Railroad Workers (Room 102) 

  • Panel: Benjamin Pykles (moderator), Anne Oliver, Sheri Murray-Ellis, and Ken Cannonadmin-ajax1
  • This session is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service

 

Disability Rights Movement in Utah and the Nation (Room 104)

  • Panel: Claire Mantonya (chair), Marilyn Bown, Sherry L. Repscher, and Barbara Toomer

Documenting the Topaz Experience (Room 105)

  • Kimberly M. Jew (chair)
    Scotti Hill: When Words Weren’t Enough: Curating the Topaz Museum’s Inaugural Art Exhibition
  • Jane Beckwith: A Founders View, Topaz Museum
  • Christian Heimburger: “We Have Come to Understand Them, and We Admit We Need Them”: Japanese American Laborers in the Interior West, 1942-1944

The Power of Oral History: Uncovering the Stories of Latino/as in Utah (Suite A) Redd Logo

  • Panel: Matt Basso (chair), Jennifer Macias, Juan Jose Garcia, Andrea Garavito Martinez

 

 

Splinters of a Nation: The Story of German Prisoners of War in Utah (documentary/panel) (Suite B)

  • Panel: Scott Porter, Allan Kent Powell

12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Lunch Program

Welcome: Gregory C. Thompson, Chair, Board of State History

Update on Division of State History: Brad Westwood, Director, Division of State History

2015 Annual Utah State History Awards: Gregory C. Thompson and Brad Westwood

Introduction of Dr. Pam Perlich: Dina Blaes, Vice-Chair, Board of State History

Keynote: Dr. Pam Perlich: Utah’s Hidden Diversity: Decoding Evidence from the Census

1:45 p.m. – 3:15 p.m. Track

Paiutes and the Circleville Massacre after 150 Years (Room 101) Westerners

  • Panel: Richard E. Turley Jr. (chair), Suzanne Catharine, Edward Leo Lyman, Albert Winkler

 

Pitching Tents and Breaking Trail: Three Historians Afield with the Utah War (Room 102) 

  • Ken Gallacher (chair)
  • Kenneth L. Alford (paper to be presented by William P. MacKinnon): “And a Bitter Experience It fortudougWas”: The Utah War and the 1858 Move South
  • James F. Martin: “Sibleys amongst the Snow”: Locating Old Camp Scott
  • William P. MacKinnon: Summing Up the Utah War: One Historian’s Twenty-first Century Conclusions

Immigration in Early Twentieth-Century Utah (Room 104)

  • John Sillito (chair)
  • Brian Whitney and Lorrie Rands: Immigrants at the Crossroads: An Oral History of Immigration into Ogden, Utah
  • Eileen Hallet Stone: Utah’s Jewish Agrarian Pioneers
  • Rochelle Kaplan: Jews in Utah: Not an Oxymoron!

Many Voices in Utah History (Room 105)

  • Colleen Whitley (chair)
  • Allen Dale Roberts: British Influence on Pioneer Utah’s Greek and Gothic Revival
  • David A. Hales and Sandra Dawn Brimhall: You’re a Woman. You Can’t Be a Certified Public Accountant: The Trials and Struggles of Hannah Claire Haines, Utah’s First Woman CPA and Prominent Business Woman
  • J. Seth Anderson:  “We’re Here, We’re Queer, We’re Fabulous, Get Used to Us!”: Queer Nation Utah, 1991-1992

Latino Voices in Cache Valley (Suite A)

  • Panel: Brad Cole (chair), Randy Williams, Eduardo Ortiz, Maria Luisa Spicer-Escalante

The Twelve Left Behind (documentary)
Speaking with Bishop John Wester (documentary) (Suite B)

  • Desk Top History’s film short “The Twelve Left Behind,” the story of Italian prisoners of war during World War II, produced by Kelly Nelson

3:30 – 5:00 p.m.

Religion and Race: Evaluating Religion of a Different Color: Race and the Mormon Struggle for Whiteness (Room 101)

  • Panel: Brad Westwood (chair), Martha Evans Bradley, David Rich Lewis, W. Paul Reeve, and LaShawn Williams-Schultz

Diversity and Sport (Room 102)

  • Richard Kimball (chair)
  • Joseph Soderborg: Wicket Mormons and Cricket Gentiles: Cultural Imperialism in Utah’s Sporting Past
  • Intermountain Cricket League Exhibition

Two Changing Faces of Fundamentalist Mormonism (Room 104)

  • Newell G. Bringhurst: The Transformation of Rulon Timpson Jeffs: From Devout Mormon to FLDS Prophet
  • Craig L. Foster: “Proclamations and Prophecies from a Prison Cell: How Warren Jeffs Continues to Control the FLDS

Native-White Interaction in Nineteenth-Century Utah (Room 105)

  • David Grua (chair)
  • Wendy Simmons Johnson: An Underground Store, the Skull Valley Goshute, and Red Ink: Contact Period in Rush Valley
  • Hadyn B. Call: Kidnapped and Purchased: Piecing Together the Story of Ruth Piede Call Davids—a Paiute Indian
  • Jim Keyes: Showdown in the Canyons: History of Interaction between Early Cattle Ranchers and Native Americans in Southeastern Utah.

Exploring Utah’s Multicultural Past through Oral History (Suite A)

  • Jodi Graham (chair)
  • Randy Williams: Cache Valley Refugee Voices
  • Deborah M. George: Root Sounds: The Utah African American Experience in Ogden
  • Sarah Singh: Twenty-fifth Street: The City That Never Slept

Utah’s Polynesian History (Suite B)

  • Panel: Philip Notarianni (chair), Jake Fitisemanu Jr., Ulysses Thomas Tongaoneval, Susi Feitch-Malohifo’ou, and others

Utah Archaeology Week Open House

DIG INTO UTAH’S PAST
COME SEE HOW ARCHAEOLOGY TELLS THE STORY OF UTAH’S ANCIENT PEOPLE
What: Utah Archaeology Week Open House
When: Saturday, May 3, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Where: Rio Grande Depot, 300 South Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City

SALT LAKE CITY – Find out more about Utah’s incredible past during Utah Archaeology Week, May 3-10, 2014. Archaeological themed events will be held throughout the state to educate the public about Utah’s fabulous archaeological heritage.

On May 3, the Utah Division of State History will host the Archaeology Week Open House from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Participants will be able to throw a special spear called an atlatl, grind corn using stone tools, make Fremont figurines, see how projectile points are made, buy Indian tacos, and much more. The event is free and open to the public.

“Archaeology Week gives the community a chance to connect to Utah’s unique past,” says Brad Westwood, Director, Utah State History. “It helps people realize that we have 13,000 plus years of human activity in Utah. Archaeology is our heritage and should be celebrated.”

Organizations throughout Utah will be hosting additional special events during Utah Archaeology Week. For a complete listing of statewide events, please visit history.utah.gov/archaeology-week or call Deb Miller at 801-245-7249 or email damiller@utah.gov.

# # #

Find more about us online at heritage.utah.gov
State History serves the citizens of Utah by helping to make history accessible, exciting, and relevant-and integral to the economy and culture of the state. State History is a division of the Department of Heritage and Arts.

Download the Press Release in PDF form

Research Center: Special Hours

Did you know? The Downtown Farmer’s Market is coming to the Rio Grande Depot every other Saturday during the winter. In conjunction with these events, the Research Center will be open from 10am – 2pm on the following Saturdays:

  • November 9th, 2013
  • November 23rd, 2013
  • December 7th, 2013
  • December 21st, 2013

Take advantage of these extended hours to get your holiday research projects done!

Read more about the services offered at the Research Center here.