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World War II Honor List

The End of World War II in Images

Taken on August 14, 1945, the following images taken in downtown Salt Lake City are from the Salt Lake Tribune Collection housed at the Utah State Historical Society. Gathered by Ron Fox, these photos capture the emotion felt as Japan surrendered.

Click here for Utah’s World War II “Honor List of Dead and Missing,” which was published by the War Department in June 1946. This report also lists each Utahn casualty by name, according to their county of residence.

 

National Register Nominations | September 2014

In October 2014, the Board of State History, for the Utah Division of State History, will review five (5) nominations to the National Register. These nominations are:

John & Margaret Price House in Salt Lake City


Murray City Diesel Power Plant in Murray


Rawsel & Jane Bradford House in Murray


James & Mary Jane Miller House in Murray


John & Sarah Jane Wayman House in Centerville


The Board of State History meets on October 17, 2014. These meetings are public. To view or print the meeting agenda, please visit the Board of State History on this web site. Please note: agenda for October 2014 may be delayed due to the production of the sixty-second annual Utah State History conference.

Utah’s Latest Additions to the National Register

Check out the latest historic properties in Utah listed on the National Register of Historic Places: the Smithfield Tabernacle, Smithfield, Cache County; the Thomas Clark & Millie Callister House, Fillmore, Millard County; and the J.M. Wilbur & Company Blacksmith Shop, Eden, Weber County.


Smithfield Tabernacle
Smithfield, Cache County

Statement of Significance: The Smithfield Tabernacle/Youth Recreation Center, located in Smithfield, Cache County, was constructed in 1902 (construction commenced in 1883) and renovated in 1955.  The building is locally significant under Criteria A in the areas of Religion and Community Planning and Development, as well as the areas of Social History and Entertainment/Recreation.  In the area of Religion, the building is significant as it was the primary place of worship for the Latter-day Saint (LDS or Mormon) community in Smithfield for many decades. The Smithfield Tabernacle was financed and constructed by the local Smithfield Ward congregation which was unusual for a small congregation to construct such a large edifice. The vast majority of LDS tabernacles were constructed by and for multiple Latter-day Saint congregations to meet together in a larger congregation called a Stake.  It should be noted that this falls under Criteria Consideration A as the Smithfield Tabernacle was originally a religious-use building.  However, the building is also significant for reasons other than religious use.  In the area of Community Planning and Development it is significant for its association with the planning and development of Smithfield City, specifically in the development and use of public space.  Typical of early Mormon settlements in the Great Basin region, this large edifice was constructed on the public square to serve as the community center and to establish a feeling of permanence.  In the areas of Social History and Entertainment/Recreation the building is significant as an important gathering place for community and recreational purposes. From the time of its construction the Smithfield Tabernacle was the largest building in Smithfield and was the symbolic center of the community.  As such it was used for all large community gatherings including plays, concerts, graduation ceremonies, and political and agricultural meetings, in addition to religious services. When the local LDS congregation outgrew the Smithfield Tabernacle in 1942, out of concern for the deterioration of the unused building, which had been an icon the community, residents found a new purpose for the building as a much-needed youth recreation center. It served as the only public recreation facility in Smithfield from 1955 until the construction of a new recreation center in 2000.  Although the Smithfield Tabernacle had significant architectural changes when remodeled as the Youth Recreation Center, the building remains a strong representation of the development and use of public space in the Smithfield City as well as a social and recreational facility at the heart of the community. Although some architectural details are altered or were removed, the building still clearly reflects its original use as a place of worship, while accommodating the more recent use as a recreation facility. The period of significance is from the time of construction in 1902 to the end of the historic period in 1966.

Read the full nomination:
ut_cache-county_smithfield-tabernacle


Thomas Clark & Millie Callister House
Fillmore, Millard County

Statement of Significance: The Thomas Clark and Millie Callister House, constructed 1896 in Fillmore, Millard County, is locally significant under Criteria A and B.  Under Criterion A the house is significant in the area of Communication. The Callister House served as the main office of the Millard County Telegraph and Telephone Company for 15 years. The main switchboard was operated by Mildred “Millie” Callister, wife of Thomas Clark Callister. This was the first telephone switchboard in the county and provided phone service for the entire county. Under Criterion B the house is significant in the area of Politics and Government. Thomas Clark Callister lived here while serving as mayor for two terms from 1917 to 1920. As one of Fillmore’s most influential mayors, he was a well-known engineer who spearheaded much of Millard County’s water and irrigation infrastructure during his time in office. His work as county surveyor and engineer was attributed to controlling flood and erosion of the Fillmore Mountains. Thomas Clark also was a prominent businessman, who owned the Millard County Telegraph and Telephone Company and was chairman to several committees in his lifetime, including the Library Loan and American Red Cross.  The period of significance is 1907 to c.1922. This covers the period the house was purchased by the Callisters and the telephone switchboard was installed until the operation was moved to another building, c.1922. This also includes the two terms Clark Callister served as Mayor of Fillmore, from 1917-1920.

Read the full nomination:
ut_millard-county_thomas-millie-callister-house


J.M. Wilbur Company Blacksmith Shop
Eden, Weber County

Statement of Significance: The J.M.Wilbur Company Blacksmith Shop, built in 1895 and rehabilitated 2011-2014, is a brick, one-part block commercial building with a stepped gable parapet and Late Victorian Commercial details. The building is historically significant under Criteria A. The period of significance dates from 1895, when it was built by Jesse Wilbur, to1951, when Jesse passed away. Jesse partnered with his son Glenn in 1924, and they used this building as a commercial outlet providing primarily blacksmithing and other related services to local farmers and the surrounding communities. Following Jesse’s death, Glenn carried on the business for two more decades. It is significant under Criterion A in the areas of Industry and Commerce because it provided essential services in a developing community and played a vital role in the development and success of the village of Eden, Utah and surrounding Ogden Valley.  The building was originally designed and constructed to facilitate the needs of the blacksmithing industry—a once very common and necessary business in frontier life—and is the only known continuously functioning blacksmith shop remaining in the region. Following a recent careful rehabilitation, the building continues to operate as a blacksmith shop today.

Read the full nomination:
ut_weber-county_jm-wilbur-co-blacksmith-shop


The National Register of Historic Places is the official federal list of properties that are significant in American history, architecture, archaeology, or engineering.

How can I get a house or building listed? (and other frequently asked questions)

 

National Register Nominations | January 2017

On January 19, 2017, the State Historic Preservation Review Board, for the Utah Division of State History, will review two nominations for the National Register of Historic Places. These are:

ut_grand-county_ballard-sego-coal-mine-hd, Ballard-Sego Coal Mine Historic District
Thompson vicinity, Grand County
ut_cache-co_-river-heights-sinclair-service-station, River Heights Sinclair Station
River Heights, Cache County

The State Historic Preservation Review Board will meet on Thursday, January 19, 2017, at 1:00 pm, in the Board Room of the historic Rio Grande Depot building, 300 S. Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City, to review the NRHP nominations. These meetings are public. To view or print the meeting agenda, please visit the Board of State History on this web site.

Call for Entries Open for “DesignArts Utah ’14” – 19 May 2014

Utah Arts & Museums announces the call for entries for “DesignArts Utah ’14,” a juried exhibition highlighting the work of professional and student designers in any design field who currently live in Utah. Ellen Lupton, senior curator of contemporary design at the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Museum in New York, is this year’s juror. All entries must be submitted by June 27, 2014.

This exhibition of selected designs opens Friday, August 29 and runs through Friday, October 17, 2014, culminating with a closing reception in conjunction with Salt Lake Design Week and Salt Lake Gallery Stroll. The exhibition will be inside the Rio Grande Depot in the Rio Gallery, located at 300 South Rio Grande (455 West) in Salt Lake City. The designer selected as the Juror’s Award Winner will receive a $3,000 recognition and thank-you award for the achievement and contribution to Utah.

Juror Ellen Lupton is senior curator of contemporary design at the Smithsonian’s Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum in New York City. Recent museum projects include “Graphic Design — Now in Production,” an exhibition on national tour through 2014, co-organized by Cooper-Hewitt and the Walker Art Center. Lupton also serves as director of the graphic design MFA program at MICA (Maryland Institute College of Art), where she has authored numerous books on design processes, including Thinking with Type, Graphic Design Thinking, and Graphic Design: The New Basics.

DesignArts annual exhibitions feature selections of designs, prototypes, and produced samples by designers in Utah’s various design fields. Designers may submit produced work or conceptual, pre-production documentation. All Utah designers are invited to participate, including those in the fields of architecture (landscape or structural and community planning and design — urban and rural), as well as those in brand/packaging, display, fashion, furniture, graphic, industrial, interior, lighting, theatre or film set, transportation, web design or other design fields. Entries may be submitted online or via CD/DVD to the Utah Division of Arts and Museums, Design Arts Program, 300 S. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City, UT 84101 by 5:00 p.m. on June 27, 2014.

Further information, including entry forms and instructions, is available online at www.designartsutah.org. If you have questions, contact Jim Glenn at jglenn@utah.gov or 801.245.7271.

Utah State History Announces Grants to Certified Local Governments

For immediate release

April 30, 2014

Contact:
Geoffrey Fattah, 801.245.7205
Communications Director, Utah Dept. of Heritage and Arts

For Technical Information:  Alycia Aldrich, 801.245-7226

 

Utah State History Announces Grants to Certified Local Governments

 

Salt Lake City – Utah State History has awarded over $147,000 in matching grants to 14 Certified Local Governments (CLGs) for the 2014-2015 grant year. CLG grants assist local governments in documenting and preserving historic buildings and archaeological sites.  The grants, which consist of federal and state funds, require a 50/50 match of local funds or donated services.  For more information on the Certified Local Government program, visit http://history.utah.gov.

Centerville – $9,950 for rehabilitation work on the National Register-listed Thomas and Sara Whitaker house, to conduct a selective reconnaissance level survey, prepare a National Register nomination, to attend the Utah Preservation Conference, and to publish a walking tour booklet of historic Centerville City homes.

Draper – $10,000 for rehabilitation work on the National Register-listed Joseph & Celestia Smith House or another National Register-listed home, attend a preservation conference, and to publish a historic walking tour brochure.

Emery County – $6,000 for rehabilitation work on the National Register-listed San Rafael Bridge.

Heber – $10,000 for rehabilitation work on the National Register-listed Heber City Amusement Hall.

Hurricane – $6,000 for rehabilitation work on the National Register-listed Bradshaw House/Hotel.

Leeds – $10,000 for rehabilitation work on the National Register-listed Leeds CCC Camp Historic District and the National Register-listed Wells Fargo and Company Express Building.

Manti – $7,000 for rehabilitation work on the National Register-listed Manti City Hall.

Rockville – $2,500 for rehabilitation work on the National Register-listed Russell Home in the Grafton Historic District, and to publish walking tour brochures.

Salt Lake City – $24,948 to hire a professional consultant to complete a standard reconnaissance level survey of the University Neighborhood Historic District, to host an onsite training seminar related to historic preservation, and to send members of the historic preservation commission to a national, regional, or local conference related to historic preservation.

Salt Lake County – $16,000 for rehabilitation work on the National Register-listed Henry J. Wheeler Farm, and to hire a professional consultant to prepare a multiple property National Register nomination for buildings within the Millcreek Township area.

Sandy – $10,000 to hire a licensed architect with previous experience in historic preservation to plan the preservation work for restoration of the National Register-listed Crescent Elementary School, and to publish walking tour booklets and brochures.

South Jordan – $7,500 to hire a professional financial consultant to complete a Market Demand Analysis and a Pro Forma Financial Analysis to help identify a highest and best use of the National Register-listed Samuel E. Holt Farmstead.

St. George – $10,000 to hire a consultant to conduct an archaeological survey of approximately 800 acres in the city boundaries, to update and publish the third edition of the Landmark & Historic Sites book, and to attend the Utah Preservation Conference.

Tooele County – $17,800 for rehabilitation work on the National Register-listed Benson Grist Mill, and tohire a licensed architect with previous experience in historic preservation to plan the preservation work for restoration of the historic Wendover Officer’s Club at Wendover Air Force Base.

 

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Utah Archaeology Week Open House

DIG INTO UTAH’S PAST
COME SEE HOW ARCHAEOLOGY TELLS THE STORY OF UTAH’S ANCIENT PEOPLE
What: Utah Archaeology Week Open House
When: Saturday, May 3, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Where: Rio Grande Depot, 300 South Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City

SALT LAKE CITY – Find out more about Utah’s incredible past during Utah Archaeology Week, May 3-10, 2014. Archaeological themed events will be held throughout the state to educate the public about Utah’s fabulous archaeological heritage.

On May 3, the Utah Division of State History will host the Archaeology Week Open House from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Participants will be able to throw a special spear called an atlatl, grind corn using stone tools, make Fremont figurines, see how projectile points are made, buy Indian tacos, and much more. The event is free and open to the public.

“Archaeology Week gives the community a chance to connect to Utah’s unique past,” says Brad Westwood, Director, Utah State History. “It helps people realize that we have 13,000 plus years of human activity in Utah. Archaeology is our heritage and should be celebrated.”

Organizations throughout Utah will be hosting additional special events during Utah Archaeology Week. For a complete listing of statewide events, please visit history.utah.gov/archaeology-week or call Deb Miller at 801-245-7249 or email damiller@utah.gov.

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Find more about us online at heritage.utah.gov
State History serves the citizens of Utah by helping to make history accessible, exciting, and relevant-and integral to the economy and culture of the state. State History is a division of the Department of Heritage and Arts.

Download the Press Release in PDF form

2017 State History Conference

Call for Papers

Local Matters

The Utah State Historical Society invites the public, scholars, students, policymakers, and organizations to submit proposals for papers, panels, or multimedia presentations on the theme Local Matters. This is both a call for papers and a call for the participation of community organizations such as museums, preservation groups, and historical societies. Sessions for the 65th annual Utah State History Conference will be held on October 12, 2017, at the Utah Cultural Celebration Center.

Local can be broadly conceived. We encourage submissions examining the many strands that create the fabric of communities—such as interpersonal networks, long-standing festivals, neighborhood structures, churches, schools, or the arts—or that focus more narrowly on a family or a home. And community may also be interpreted broadly as communities of faith, advocacy, hobbies, politics, and so forth. Submissions might also consider the historical roots of the recent vogue for things local: farm-to-table eating, urban redevelopment, public markets, or local music.

Separately, we welcome papers and panels that discuss the uses and historiography of local history and the application of sophisticated methodology to personal, family, and community history. How do communities go about compiling their histories? What role do organizations play in preserving local history? How does community history intersect with broader historical themes?

Submissions on other aspects of Utah history will also be considered. We welcome a range of formats, from the traditional panels and sessions to more innovative formats. We encourage full session or panel submissions, though we will make every effort to match single paper proposals with other panels and papers.

Each proposal must include:

  • Each paper proposal, whether individual or in a session, should include a 1,000-word abstract detailing the presentation and its significance. Submissions for entire sessions or panels should include a session title and a 1000 word session abstract that outlines the purpose of the session, along with a confirmed chair and/or commentator, if applicable.
  • Brief bio (50-word limit) and accompanying c.v. with address, phone, and email for each participant
  • Audio-visual requirements
  • Your permission, if selected, for media interviews, session audio/visual recordings, and electronic sessions or podcasts during or in advance of the conference. The Historical Society will use these recording in its effort to meet its history-related mission.

We will accept submissions until April 15, 2017.

Click here to submit a individual paper proposal

Click here to submit a panel or multiple presenter session proposal

Please direct questions regarding submissions to Dr. George or Dr. Rogers at uhq@utah.gov.

For general conference information, please contact Alycia Rowley at 801-245-7226 or aaldrich@utah.gov.

2017 Utah State History Conference home page

Helen Z. Papanikolas Award for Best Student Paper on Utah Women’s History

Utah State History sponsors the Papanikolas Award to encourage new scholarly research in the area of Utah women’s history at colleges and universities.  The award is named for Helen Z. Papanikolas (1917-2004), a former member of the Utah State Board of History who was most noted for her research and writing on Utah and ethnic history, but also wrote fiction, as well as women’s history.

Submission Guidelines

  • Papers must address some historical aspect of women’s lives in Utah.
  • The author must be enrolled at a college or university.
  • Papers need not be published.
  • Papers should include original research that includes primary sources.  The paper must be footnoted.
  • Papers must be received by June 1, 2014.
  • Please call or E-mail us on June 1, 2014 if you have not heard directly from us that we received your paper.

The winner receives a monetary award as well as being honored at Utah State History’s annual meeting held September 25-27, 2014 in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Submit papers to:

Linda Thatcher
(801) 534-0911
thatcher0911@msn.com