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World War II Honor List

The End of World War II in Images

Taken on August 14, 1945, the following images taken in downtown Salt Lake City are from the Salt Lake Tribune Collection housed at the Utah State Historical Society. Gathered by Ron Fox, these photos capture the emotion felt as Japan surrendered.

Click here for Utah’s World War II “Honor List of Dead and Missing,” which was published by the War Department in June 1946. This report also lists each Utahn casualty by name, according to their county of residence.

 

National Register Nominations | September 2014

In October 2014, the Board of State History, for the Utah Division of State History, will review five (5) nominations to the National Register. These nominations are:

John & Margaret Price House in Salt Lake City


Murray City Diesel Power Plant in Murray


Rawsel & Jane Bradford House in Murray


James & Mary Jane Miller House in Murray


John & Sarah Jane Wayman House in Centerville


The Board of State History meets on October 17, 2014. These meetings are public. To view or print the meeting agenda, please visit the Board of State History on this web site. Please note: agenda for October 2014 may be delayed due to the production of the sixty-second annual Utah State History conference.

Utah’s Latest Additions to the National Register

Check out the latest historic properties in Utah listed on the National Register of Historic Places: The Coal Bed Village Site, San Juan County; Ron’s Phillips 66 Service State, Centerville: The Great Hunt Panel, Carbon County; Oregon Short Line RR Station, Layton; Salt Lake SE and NW Base Monuments, Davis County; Robert Gardner, Jr., House, Millcreek; and the Thomas & Elizabeth Coddington House, James & Emily Herbert House, Robert & Mary Ann Singleton House, and the Thomas & Eliza Jane Singleton House, all in American Fork.


Coal Bed Village Site
San Juan County

Statement of Significance: Coal Bed Village Site is one of the most unique Ancestral Puebloan archaeological sites anywhere in the United States because of its size, architectural patterns, and wealth of
archaeological data potential. Possibly ranging from the Basketmaker III period, and ending at or soon after the Pueblo III period, the site was likely occupied for over 500 years between A.D. 700 and A.D. 1300. This site is also likely an early Chacoan outlier of the San Juan Region similar to the National Register-listed Carhart Pueblo (NRIS #15000401). This site illustrates the cultural development of the Ancestral Puebloan peoples in the Montezuma Canyon and San Juan region, with clear expressions of community planning, development, and succession. Coal Bed Village is connected to a broader regional pattern of prehistoric settlement and growth throughout the American Southwest and is associated with the spread of Ancestral Puebloan cultural traditions into modern-day Utah. Thus, the site is eligible for the National Register of Historic Places at a national level and has a period of significance between A.D. 700 and A.D. 1300. Because of its clear association with the broad patterns of human occupation and settlement of San Juan County and the growth of Ancestral Puebloan populations, the site is eligible under Criterion A for the area of Ethnic Heritage, Community Planning and Development, and Religion. Criterion Consideration A also applies because of the use of the site for religious purposes. However, as noted, the site is also significant in areas other than religion. Given the complexity of long-term temporal range of the occupations, the site is an excellent resource for understanding the development of communities in the PI through PIII era, under the Community Planning and Development area of Criteria C. Finally, under Criterion D the site is significant under the area of Prehistoric Archeology and Religion and has the potential to provide information important for our understanding of national, regional, and local adaptions to community establishment, architectural construction techniques, subsistence, economics, religion, and settlement patterning during the most significant 400 years of San Juan County’s prehistoric past. Further, the site has a significant amount of intact subsurface deposits and physically extensive middens that will yield important data for understanding high, medium, and low order research questions for many years.

Read the full nomination:
Coal Bed Village Site


Ron’s Phillips 66 Service Station
Centerville, Davis County

Statement of Significance: Ron’s Phillips 66 Service Station, built in 1960, is locally significant under Criterion C as an early and architecturally significant example of the Phillips Petroleum Company’s “New Look” service station designs in the 1960s.  It is also significant as the only example of a modern style service station that retains historic integrity in Centerville. Ron’s Service Station is significant in the area of Architecture for its association with the distinctive designs produced by the Phillips 66 Company in the 1960s.  Construction on the building was completed just a few months after a wind storm destroyed the Randalls’ first Phillips 66 station at the same location.  The Phillips Petroleum Company provided the design for the new service station, the prototype for Phillips 66’s “New Look” based on designs produced by the company’s architect, Clarence Reinhardt.  All of Reinhardt’s variations included an upwardly canted triangular canopy, a design influenced by the fins found on automobiles and rockets of the time period.  Ron’s Service Station, built in the spring of 1960, appears to have been one of the earliest examples.  Although the Phillips 66 Company built over 3,000 similar service stations in the 1960s, Ron’s Service Station in Centerville is distinguished by its rare footprint, historic integrity, continuous usage, and the extant original pumps.  The period of significance spans the original construction in 1960 to 1967, the current cut-off date for National Register eligibility.  Ron’s Phillips 66 Service Station is a distinctive landmark building on Centerville’s Main Street and represents the contributions of the Randall family to the community of Centerville.

Read the full nomination:
Ron’s Phillips 66 Service Station


The Great Hunt Panel
Nine Mile Canyon, Carbon County

Statement of Significance: The Great Hunt Panel Site (42Cb239) is a nationally significant representation of prehistoric rock art, located in Nine Mile Canyon. One of the five panels, the Great Hunt Panel, has been used in publications across the globe and is a nationally-recognizable prehistoric artistic expression of prehistoric life. The site is eligible under Criteria A, C, and D as established under the “West Tavaputs Adaptation” and “Rock Art” contexts under the “Historic and Prehistoric Resources of Nine Mile Canyon” Multiple Property Submission.. Under Criteria Consideration A, the site was likely used for religious purposes by Native peoples in the past; however, it is significant in other areas as well.  Criteria A is applicable in the areas of Religion and Ethnic Heritage-Native American, as the site displays religious behavior and hunting behavior for our understanding of “Food Procurement” in the Nine Mile Canyon (Spangler 2009: E-20). The site is also significant in the area of Social History for its representation of “Social Structure” (Spangler 2009:E25-E26), and overall community use of the Canyon. Under Criteria C in the area of Art, the rock art panels, specifically the Great Hunt Panel demonstrate the work of a master through excellent use of decorative and graphical elements and their overall composition. The art is also indicative of a period and style, dating to the Archaic and Fremont periods. The Fremont Complex refers to a Formative-period human culture that were both farmers and foragers who heavily depended on maize agriculture as represented in their rock art, and also hunters of bighorn sheep, deer, elk, bison, and antelope (which are represented in their rock art). Finally, Reagan’s 1931 excavations, coupled with further research potential from analyzing the rock art itself, the site has yielded and will still yield significant information regarding prehistory of Nine Mile Canyon and beyond under Criteria D. Innovative research into the style, composition, location, and socio-cultural meaning of prehistoric rock art is a robust academic field, and this site has high integrity to convey important information of past lifeways, local landscape use, and a cosmological understanding of past and contemporary Native peoples.  Artistic motifs range from the Archaic through the Fremont-period, thus the period of significance is 8000 BP to 700 BP. There are no significant historic inscriptions at these panels, thus the period of significance ends at the end of the Fremont period.

Read the full nomination:
Great Hunt Panel


Oregon Short Line RR Station
Layton, Davis County

Statement of Significance: The Oregon Short Line Railroad Station in Layton, Utah, is significant as one of only a handful of surviving historic stations and depots built by the Oregon Short Line Railroad in Utah in the early part of the twentieth century.  The building is locally significant as the only surviving example of railroad architecture in the city of Layton.  The dual-purpose passenger depot and freight house is eligible under Criterion A in the areas of Transportation and Commerce for its association with the history of the Oregon Short Line Railroad and its relationship to Layton’s historic business district. The period of significance spans sixty years, from the initial construction in 1912 to 1965, when the Oregon Short Line ceased operations in Layton.  The Layton station was built by John H. Marshall of Salt Lake City.  The property is eligible under Criterion Consideration B for moved properties. Although the building was moved in 1972, the station is still oriented to the same historic rail corridor only 1500 feet further south.  The new setting is adjacent to a commuter rail platform in Layton’s business district giving it the same general environment as the original location. Furthermore, the Layton station is the only surviving example in Davis County of a frame station house built from standardized plans provided to local contractors by the Oregon Short Line Railroad.  The Layton Oregon Short Line Railroad Station contributes to the history of Layton’s Main Street business district.

Read the full nomination:
Layton OSL RR Station


Salt Lake SE and NW Base Monuments
Layton & West Point, Davis County

Statement of Significance: The Salt Lake South East Base and North West Base Monuments were built in 1896 by William Eimbeck, Assistant, U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. The two discontiguous monuments are locally significant under Criterion A because they embody several important Areas of Significance in the history of the United States. Areas of Significance include Exploration/Settlement, Invention, and Science. Eimbeck was inventing new instrumentation, testing new engineering methods, testing scientific theories, and discovering new science with his observations.  All the while he and his men were exploring areas that were only known to a few individuals. The period of significance for the two monuments is 1896—the year they were constructed and implemented in the testing.

In the area of Exploration/Settlement the Salt Lake South East and North West Base Monuments are part of and represent the undertaking and completion of a larger effort to map the United States along the 39th parallel. Between 1879 and 1895 the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey conducted measurements between the Washington D.C. and San Francisco areas.  The monuments demark the Salt Lake Base Line which was used to anchor the Nevada Net both vertically and horizontally (elevation, latitude and longitude) for the purposes of distance for coast to coast, elevation and location of locations and physical features. The information collected was important in providing exact locational information making possible the connection of place to place. This survey assigned latitude/ longitude designations to physical locations for the first time. He also recorded magnetic measurements and curvature of the earth, neither of which had been widely completed before.

In the area of Invention, the monuments are significant for their part in Eimbeck’s invention and successful testing of the Duplex Base Apparatus (Bars no. 15 and 16), a new instrument at this location using the Salt Lake South East and North West Base Monuments. This instrument helped shoot straight lines necessary for mapping exact coordinates and determining elevation of the locations on the Nevada Net.  His invention was also important because it was more accurate and time efficient.

In the area of Science, the invention and successful testing of the Duplex Base Apparatus contributed to the development of technology and the understanding of metal conductivity which improved the field of survey engineering. Eimbeck’s overall survey and recordation helped delineate the exact location of magnetic north and the curvature of the earth (its size).

Read the full nomination:
Salt Lake Base Monuments


Robert Gardner, Jr., House
Millcreek, Salt Lake County

Statement of Significance: The Robert Gardner, Jr. House, constructed in 1848, in Millcreek, Utah has statewide significance under Criterion D in the area of non-aboriginal historic archaeology for its potential ability to provide archaeological evidence of both its unique construction and the cultural history of its occupants. The Robert Gardner, Jr. House, although its integrity has been compromised, is architecturally and historically significant as the earliest remaining example of the hall-parlor house type, earliest extant example of adobe residential construction, and one of the earliest extant buildings in the State of Utah. The Utah Statewide Historic Preservation Plan has identified adobe houses as an important unique cultural resource in the state. The original property is the location of the first working saw mill and second grist mill constructed shortly after the Mormon pioneers arrived in Utah. Archaeological examination of the original adobe construction and the circa 1850 room addition has a high potential to further our knowledge in the understudied area of historic archaeology and the origins and implementation of adobe construction, first adopted by the LDS pioneers upon their arrival in Utah. In addition, archaeological study of the building structure also has the potential to identify architectural adaptations made to accommodate the practice of polygamy. Finally, archaeological study of the surrounding property, a portion of the original homestead, has a high potential for intact subsurface archaeological deposits associated with the Gardner family and has the unique ability to further our information and understanding of several themes in Utah’s under-explored field of historical archaeology.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saint pioneer settlers arrived in Utah in the fall of 1847 and camped in a temporary fort in Salt Lake City for the winter. Robert and his brother Archibald Gardner were among the first settlers allowed to move out in the early spring of 1848, expressly directed by church leaders to develop a sawmill in the Salt Lake Valley to facilitate building construction in Salt Lake City. The Gardner families chose Mill Creek, immediately built the first saw mill in the Salt Lake Valley, established a farm, and constructed adobe rather than timber houses by the express direction of the Great Salt Lake Municipal High Council. In 1849, the Gardner brothers constructed a more substantial grist mill on the site, which was the second built in Utah.

The Robert Gardner, Jr. House retains integrity of location, setting, design, materials, workmanship, and association; only its façade has been compromised. The period of significance—1848 through 1871—was determined based on the duration of active mill operations directly associated with the house.

Read the full nomination:
Robert Gardner Jr House


Thomas & Elizabeth Coddington House
American Fork, Utah County

Statement of Significance: The Thomas and Elizabeth Coddington House, constructed in 1898 in American Fork, Utah County, Utah has local significance under Criteria A and C. The Thomas and Elizabeth Coddington House is significant under Criterion C for its elaborate Victorian Eclectic architecture, exterior decoration and also as an early and unusual example of a T-shaped cross-wing with a third parallel gable. The inclusion of a third gabled-roof element in T- or L-shaped cross-wing houses is very unusual in early Utah architecture, but there are several examples found among remaining American Fork cross-wing residences constructed in the two decades surrounding 1900. The Thomas and Elizabeth Coddington House is also significant under Criterion A for its association with the agricultural and social history of American Fork, Utah especially during the “Post-Railroad Growth, Maturation of Municipal Institutions, 1880-1911” category of the Historic and Architectural Resources of American Fork, Utah, Multiple Property Submission. A sheep rancher, Thomas Coddington exemplified the successful development of agriculture in American Fork from its founding in 1850 until World War I, culminating around the turn of the Twentieth Century in a prosperous and successful town. He was also involved in local government, with a term as American Fork Mayor, and as a Director of the Bank of American Fork. The house, constructed in 1898, is a representative example of the home of a successful rancher and civic leader in American Fork during this period of agricultural expansion. Thomas Coddington purchased this parcel from its original title holder, George and Eliza Robinson on October 17, 1898 when he and his wife Elizabeth constructed the house. The period of significance spans from when Thomas Coddington built and resided in the house from its completion in 1898 until his sudden death on April 24, 1931. The Thomas and Elizabeth Coddington house retains its architectural integrity and is a contributing historic resource in American Fork..

Read the full nomination:
Coddington Thomas and Elizabeth House


James & Emily Herbert House
American Fork, Utah County

Statement of Significance: The James and Emily Herbert House, constructed in 1899 in American Fork, Utah County, Utah has local significance under Criterion C. The James and Emily Herbert House is significant under Criterion C in the area of Architecture as the only identified example of Victorian Romanesque Revival residential architecture in American Fork and as a late and unusual example of an L-shaped cross-wing with a third smaller parallel side gable in front of the side wing. The inclusion of a third gabled-roof element in T- or L-shaped cross-wing houses is very unusual in early Utah architecture, but there are several examples found among remaining American Fork cross-wing residences constructed in the two decades surrounding 1900. The house is associated the “Post-Railroad Growth, Maturation of Municipal Institutions, 1880-1911” category of the Historic and Architectural Resources of American Fork, Utah, Multiple Property Submission. The Herbert House is a representative example of the residence of a successful businessman and civic leader during this period of successful mining, agriculture and commercial development of American Fork. In 1920, a large bungalow-style porch was added to the main façade, changing the overall appearance and ending the period of significance. Although the porch augments the original Romanesque Revival appearance, it blends well with the existing architecture and is significant in its own right. The James and Emily Herbert House retains food architectural integrity and is a contributing historic resource in American Fork.

Read the full nomination:
Herbert James and Emily House


Robert & Mary Ann Singleton House
American Fork, Utah County

Statement of Significance: The Robert and Mary Ann Singleton House, constructed circa 1897 in American Fork, Utah County, Utah has local significance under Criteria A and C. The Robert and Mary Ann Singleton House is significant under Criterion C for its elaborate Victorian Eclectic architecture, decorative brickwork, and also as an early and unusual example of a T-shaped cross-wing with a third rear-facing parallel gable. The period of significance begins the year of construction, 1897. These complex crosswing houses exhibit more elaborate construction and Victorian decoration than the typical local crosswing house, and were clearly the houses of more affluent citizens. Around the turn of the twentieth century in American Fork, those wealthy citizens were farmers, ranchers and miners. The Robert and Mary Ann Singleton House is also significant under Criterion A for its association with the agricultural history of American Fork, Utah especially during the “Post-Railroad Growth, Maturation of Municipal Institutions, 1880-1911” category of the Historic and Architectural Resources of American Fork, Utah, Multiple Property Submission. Robert Singleton was a wealthy second generation resident of American Fork and a farmer and rancher who owned and farmed 88 acres worth $1,600 in 1900, as well as grazing his livestock in the local canyons. Robert Singleton was a founding member of the Deer Creek Land and Livestock Company, and sat on the board for six years.The Robert and Mary Ann Singleton house retains its architectural integrity and is a contributing resource in American Fork

Read the full nomination:
Singleton Robert and Mary Ann House


Thomas & Eliza Jane Singleton House
American Fork, Utah County

Statement of Significance: The Thomas and Eliza Jane Singleton House, constructed in 1897 in American Fork, Utah County, Utah has local significance under Criteria A and C. The Thomas Singleton House is significant under Criterion C as an architecturally unique example of an unusual double cross-wing and a one-of-a-kind hybrid of the Victorian, Second Empire Mansard and Eastlake styles. The house represents the prosperous second-generation residents of American Fork who built and occupied stately Victorian homes on small farms outside of the American Fork town limits around the turn of the twentieth century. Under Criterion A it is significant for its association with the agricultural history of American Fork, Utah, especially during the “Post-Railroad Growth, Maturation of Municipal Institutions, 1880-1911” category of the Historic and Architectural Resources of American Fork, Utah, Multiple Property Submission. Thomas Singleton farmed 34 acres around American Fork, was one of the largest cattle and sheep raisers in American Fork, and was a horse breeder and trainer who provided work teams for projects throughout the area. As a farmer and rancher, Thomas Singleton exemplified the successful development of agriculture and prosperity that occurred in American Fork from its founding in 1850 until World War I, culminating around the turn of the Twentieth Century in a prosperous and successful town. Thomas and Eliza Jane Singleton were deeded the two-and-a-half acre parcel where the house is located in early 1898 from Hannah Binns Singleton, the second and polygamist wife of John Singleton, who received the official deed to the property in 1874. The Singletons used this property as a farm as early as the 1850s in conjunction with another property southeast of American Fork where she, Thomas and Eliza Jane Singleton resided. The Thomas Singleton family owned and resided in the house at 778 East 50 South from its completion in 1897, the beginning of the period of significance, until Eliza Jane’s death on September 12, 1931, ending the period of significance.The Thomas Singleton house retains its architectural integrity and is a contributing resource in American Fork and Utah County

Read the full nomination:
Singleton Thomas and Eliza Jane House



The National Register of Historic Places is the official federal list of properties that are significant in American history, architecture, archaeology, or engineering.

How can I get a house or building listed? (and other frequently asked questions)

 

National Register Nominations | August 2018

On August 2, 2018, the State Historic Preservation Review Board, for the Utah Division of State History, will review 5 nominations. Three of those are part of the “Historic Resources of Draper” Multiple Property Submission. The noinations are:

Individual Buildings

UT_Salt Lake County_Draper MPS_Nielsen-Sanderson House, Nielsen-Sanderson House, Draper, Salt Lake County

UT_Salt Lake County_Draper MPS_Tuft-House-Brunham Granary, Tuft House & Burnham Granary, Draper, Salt Lake County

UT_Salt Lake County_Draper MPS_Young-Cottrell House, Young-Cottrell House, Draper, Salt Lake County

UT_Salt Lake County_Parrish House, Lowell & Emily Parrish House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County

UT_Salt Lake County_Sandy MPS_James A and Janet Muir House, James & Janet Muir House, Sandy, Salt Lake County

The State Historic Preservation Review Board will meet on Thursday, August 2, 2018, at 1:00 pm, in the Board Room of the historic Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City, to review the NRHP nominations. These meetings are public. To view or print the meeting agenda, please visit the Board of State History on this web site.

Call for Entries Open for “DesignArts Utah ’14” – 19 May 2014

Utah Arts & Museums announces the call for entries for “DesignArts Utah ’14,” a juried exhibition highlighting the work of professional and student designers in any design field who currently live in Utah. Ellen Lupton, senior curator of contemporary design at the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Museum in New York, is this year’s juror. All entries must be submitted by June 27, 2014.

This exhibition of selected designs opens Friday, August 29 and runs through Friday, October 17, 2014, culminating with a closing reception in conjunction with Salt Lake Design Week and Salt Lake Gallery Stroll. The exhibition will be inside the Rio Grande Depot in the Rio Gallery, located at 300 South Rio Grande (455 West) in Salt Lake City. The designer selected as the Juror’s Award Winner will receive a $3,000 recognition and thank-you award for the achievement and contribution to Utah.

Juror Ellen Lupton is senior curator of contemporary design at the Smithsonian’s Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum in New York City. Recent museum projects include “Graphic Design — Now in Production,” an exhibition on national tour through 2014, co-organized by Cooper-Hewitt and the Walker Art Center. Lupton also serves as director of the graphic design MFA program at MICA (Maryland Institute College of Art), where she has authored numerous books on design processes, including Thinking with Type, Graphic Design Thinking, and Graphic Design: The New Basics.

DesignArts annual exhibitions feature selections of designs, prototypes, and produced samples by designers in Utah’s various design fields. Designers may submit produced work or conceptual, pre-production documentation. All Utah designers are invited to participate, including those in the fields of architecture (landscape or structural and community planning and design — urban and rural), as well as those in brand/packaging, display, fashion, furniture, graphic, industrial, interior, lighting, theatre or film set, transportation, web design or other design fields. Entries may be submitted online or via CD/DVD to the Utah Division of Arts and Museums, Design Arts Program, 300 S. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City, UT 84101 by 5:00 p.m. on June 27, 2014.

Further information, including entry forms and instructions, is available online at www.designartsutah.org. If you have questions, contact Jim Glenn at jglenn@utah.gov or 801.245.7271.

Utah State History Announces Grants to Certified Local Governments

For immediate release

April 30, 2014

Contact:
Geoffrey Fattah, 801.245.7205
Communications Director, Utah Dept. of Heritage and Arts

For Technical Information:  Alycia Aldrich, 801.245-7226

 

Utah State History Announces Grants to Certified Local Governments

 

Salt Lake City – Utah State History has awarded over $147,000 in matching grants to 14 Certified Local Governments (CLGs) for the 2014-2015 grant year. CLG grants assist local governments in documenting and preserving historic buildings and archaeological sites.  The grants, which consist of federal and state funds, require a 50/50 match of local funds or donated services.  For more information on the Certified Local Government program, visit http://history.utah.gov.

Centerville – $9,950 for rehabilitation work on the National Register-listed Thomas and Sara Whitaker house, to conduct a selective reconnaissance level survey, prepare a National Register nomination, to attend the Utah Preservation Conference, and to publish a walking tour booklet of historic Centerville City homes.

Draper – $10,000 for rehabilitation work on the National Register-listed Joseph & Celestia Smith House or another National Register-listed home, attend a preservation conference, and to publish a historic walking tour brochure.

Emery County – $6,000 for rehabilitation work on the National Register-listed San Rafael Bridge.

Heber – $10,000 for rehabilitation work on the National Register-listed Heber City Amusement Hall.

Hurricane – $6,000 for rehabilitation work on the National Register-listed Bradshaw House/Hotel.

Leeds – $10,000 for rehabilitation work on the National Register-listed Leeds CCC Camp Historic District and the National Register-listed Wells Fargo and Company Express Building.

Manti – $7,000 for rehabilitation work on the National Register-listed Manti City Hall.

Rockville – $2,500 for rehabilitation work on the National Register-listed Russell Home in the Grafton Historic District, and to publish walking tour brochures.

Salt Lake City – $24,948 to hire a professional consultant to complete a standard reconnaissance level survey of the University Neighborhood Historic District, to host an onsite training seminar related to historic preservation, and to send members of the historic preservation commission to a national, regional, or local conference related to historic preservation.

Salt Lake County – $16,000 for rehabilitation work on the National Register-listed Henry J. Wheeler Farm, and to hire a professional consultant to prepare a multiple property National Register nomination for buildings within the Millcreek Township area.

Sandy – $10,000 to hire a licensed architect with previous experience in historic preservation to plan the preservation work for restoration of the National Register-listed Crescent Elementary School, and to publish walking tour booklets and brochures.

South Jordan – $7,500 to hire a professional financial consultant to complete a Market Demand Analysis and a Pro Forma Financial Analysis to help identify a highest and best use of the National Register-listed Samuel E. Holt Farmstead.

St. George – $10,000 to hire a consultant to conduct an archaeological survey of approximately 800 acres in the city boundaries, to update and publish the third edition of the Landmark & Historic Sites book, and to attend the Utah Preservation Conference.

Tooele County – $17,800 for rehabilitation work on the National Register-listed Benson Grist Mill, and tohire a licensed architect with previous experience in historic preservation to plan the preservation work for restoration of the historic Wendover Officer’s Club at Wendover Air Force Base.

 

# # #

Utah Archaeology Week Open House

DIG INTO UTAH’S PAST
COME SEE HOW ARCHAEOLOGY TELLS THE STORY OF UTAH’S ANCIENT PEOPLE
What: Utah Archaeology Week Open House
When: Saturday, May 3, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Where: Rio Grande Depot, 300 South Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City

SALT LAKE CITY – Find out more about Utah’s incredible past during Utah Archaeology Week, May 3-10, 2014. Archaeological themed events will be held throughout the state to educate the public about Utah’s fabulous archaeological heritage.

On May 3, the Utah Division of State History will host the Archaeology Week Open House from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Participants will be able to throw a special spear called an atlatl, grind corn using stone tools, make Fremont figurines, see how projectile points are made, buy Indian tacos, and much more. The event is free and open to the public.

“Archaeology Week gives the community a chance to connect to Utah’s unique past,” says Brad Westwood, Director, Utah State History. “It helps people realize that we have 13,000 plus years of human activity in Utah. Archaeology is our heritage and should be celebrated.”

Organizations throughout Utah will be hosting additional special events during Utah Archaeology Week. For a complete listing of statewide events, please visit history.utah.gov/archaeology-week or call Deb Miller at 801-245-7249 or email damiller@utah.gov.

# # #

Find more about us online at heritage.utah.gov
State History serves the citizens of Utah by helping to make history accessible, exciting, and relevant-and integral to the economy and culture of the state. State History is a division of the Department of Heritage and Arts.

Download the Press Release in PDF form

Helen Z. Papanikolas Award for Best Student Paper on Utah Women’s History

Utah State History sponsors the Papanikolas Award to encourage new scholarly research in the area of Utah women’s history at colleges and universities.  The award is named for Helen Z. Papanikolas (1917-2004), a former member of the Utah State Board of History who was most noted for her research and writing on Utah and ethnic history, but also wrote fiction, as well as women’s history.

Submission Guidelines

  • Papers must address some historical aspect of women’s lives in Utah.
  • The author must be enrolled at a college or university.
  • Papers need not be published.
  • Papers should include original research that includes primary sources.  The paper must be footnoted.
  • Papers must be received by June 1, 2014.
  • Please call or E-mail us on June 1, 2014 if you have not heard directly from us that we received your paper.

The winner receives a monetary award as well as being honored at Utah State History’s annual meeting held September 25-27, 2014 in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Submit papers to:

Linda Thatcher
(801) 534-0911
thatcher0911@msn.com

Creating Positive Impacts in FY2013

VisualHighlights

Visual Division Highlights Report FY2013

In FY2013, the Utah Division of State History aimed to positively impact communities throughout Utah by assisting developers, agencies, communities, architects, archaeologists, researchers, genealogists, law enforcement, Certified Local Governments, homeowners, teachers, students, and the general public.

These reports show the impact of State History’s services on communities throughout Utah, on the economy, and on the general state of heritage and history in the state of Utah. State History’s programs–Antiquities, Historic Preservation, Library & Collections, and Public History seek to positively impact the communities and constituents they serve through free or easily-accessible services, and looks forward to another year of providing the services our communities need to thrive.

texthighlights

Text Only Division Highlights Report FY2013

  Please feel free to download this report in a text-only format, or a more compact, visual format.

Please note that both reports are .pdf documents and you will need Adobe Reader to download and read these reports. To get a free copy of Adobe Reader, click here.