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NHPA 50 Year Anniversary

Join the nationwide celebration for the 50th Anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) in 2016. This Act transformed the face of communities throughout the United States and Utah by establishing a framework and incentives to preserve historic buildings, landscapes, and archaeological sites.  Coordinated through Preservation50.org, the nationwide celebration is designed to inform and engage all ages and backgrounds in this significant law’s effects on local communities and history. Since 1966, the NHPA has shaped preservation efforts on America’s history and culture while generating positive social and economic impacts. In 2015, the Utah State Historic Preservation Office (formed in 1973) gathered stakeholders to organize a year of events and to gather engaging stories and media for the celebration.

This website is a portal to a year of events and activities that cover all corners of Utah.

Events Calendar     Media     Preservation Apps     Links     Partners

shipwreckgsl

Shipwreck at the Great Salt Lake

 

Utah Drawn: An Exhibition of Rare Maps

We are pleased to announce an exhibition of forty rare historical maps depicting the region that became Utah from its earliest imaginings by European cartographers to the modern state’s boundaries.

Original maps shown are from the private collection of Salt Lake City businessman Stephen Boulay, with additional contributions from the Utah State Historical Society, LDS Church History Department, L. Tom Perry Special Collections at Brigham Young University, Special Collections at the J. Willard Marriott Library, and the American West Center at the University of Utah.

The exhibition is curated by Travis Ross and Stephen Boulay. Exhibition designer is Kerry Shaw. See here for other contributors and exhibition partners.

Additional selected maps from various institutions and private collectors will be offered as a “show and tell” event in the center of the State Capitol Rotunda on January 27, noon to 2 p.m.

The exhibition will run through late summer 2017.

For an online interactive map detailing the shifting political and cultural boundaries of Utah, see Contested Boundaries: Creating Utah’s State Lines.


UHQ Digital Exhibition

The six maps reproduced below are part of Utah Drawn: An Exhibition of Rare Maps displayed in the Utah Capitol Building fourth floor beginning January 27, 2017.

Maps serve many purposes. They represent physical geographies, recording landmarks, routes, and boundaries. But they also reflect varying perceptions, imaginations, values, and aspirations. This is certainly true of the maps presented here. Over five centuries, empires and explorers along with printers and publishers worked first to trace the outline of a continent that was new to Europeans and then, eventually, to fill in its vast middle. These maps show the steady increase of geographic knowledge of the Americas, but they also demonstrate the economic and political interests that produced that knowledge and the individuals who benefited from it. They hint at what map makers and their sponsors determined was worth documenting, identifying, and, in some cases, possessing. They often erase, obscure, and distort. Put simply: maps are more than cartographic representations of known or imagined physical features on the landscape. As you examine these maps, try to determine the purposes for which they were made and any mistruths, omissions, and distortions they may contain.


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Title: America Septentrionalis

Creator: Jan Jansson (1588-1664)

Published in: Nouveau Theatre du Monde ou Nouvel Atlas

Place: Amsterdam

Date: 1641

This striking hand-colored map by the Dutch cartographer Jan Jansson (1588-1664) was the first atlas map to treat North America on its own page, separate from the rest of the western hemisphere. Jansson produced this definitive synthesis of the best cartographic knowledge then available. In the process, he helped to canonize both true and false details about North America’s geography for generations. This was not the first map to depict California as an island, for instance, but its widespread distribution helped to popularize that misconception. The eastern seaboard illustrates the French presence along the St. Lawrence River, the English in New England and Virginia, and the Dutch in what is labeled “Novum Belgium.” Though the lake feeding the Rio Del Norte might look familiar to modern Utahns, the Great Salt Lake did not enter the written record until the Timpanogos Utes related its existence to the Dominguez-Escalanté Expedition of 1776.


 

miera-plano-geografico-de-los-descumbimientos

Title: “Plano Geografico de los Descumbimientos”

Creator: Bernardo de Miera y Pacheco (1713-1785)

Manuscript (Original at Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University)

Date: 1778 (Facsimile, 1970)

Bernardo de Miera y Pacheco (1713-1785) traveled with the Dominguez-Escalante Expedition of 1776-1777 and drew this map as a record of the journey. The party served the Spanish interest in establishing an overland route connecting Mexico to Alta California, which remained an overseas colony of New Spain in spite of its relative geographic proximity well into the next century. In this map, Miera depicted the Rio Colorado with new clarity. This map depicted “Laguna de los Timpanogos” (Utah Lake) for the first time. It also illustrates the “Great River of the West,” a mythical river that tantalized those hoping to find a water passage to Asia for nearly two hundred years. Contrary to later maps, this conflation of Utah’s modern Green River and Sevier River terminated in a lake within the Great Basin. Miera named it Laguna de Miera after himself, but modern Utahns will know it as Sevier Lake.


 

vandermaelen-partie-du-mexique-full

Title: “Partie du Mexique”

Creator: Philippe Vandermaelen (1795-1869)

Published in: Atlas Universel de Géographie Physique, Politique, Statistique Et Minéralogique

Date: 1827

Drawn by the Belgian cartographer Philippe Marie Vandermaelen (1795-1869), this map depicted the region from Lake Timpanogos (Utah Lake) to present day Colorado and Wyoming. It appeared in Vandermaelen’s six-volume Atlas Universel, published in 1827. As the first atlas to depict the entire globe with a large, consistent scale (26 miles to the inch), the individual maps in this atlas could be combined on a globe approximately 7.75 meters in diameter. The Princeton University Library’s has rendered the resulting globe digitally. The fourth volume focused on North America, he illustrated the Trans-Mississippi West in about twenty sheets.


 

UTA_Garrett_00333, Mon Oct 08, 2007, 1:57:07 PM, 8C, 8424x7804, (1998+2895), 150%, bent 6 stops, 1/25 s, R70.7, G66.9, B86.1

UTA_Garrett_00333, Mon Oct 08, 2007, 1:57:07 PM, 8C, 8424x7804, (1998+2895), 150%, bent 6 stops, 1/25 s, R70.7, G66.9, B86.1

Title: “Neueste Karte von Mexico … 1850”

Creator: Carl Christian Franz Radefeld (1788-1874)

Published in: Joseph Meyer (1796-1856), Grosser Hand-Atlas

Place: Hildburghausen

Date: 1850

Even if the U.S. government never recognized the expansive state of Deseret, the prolific mapmakers at Meyer’s publishing company Bibliographisches Institut in Hildburghausen, Germany did, if only briefly. Like Young’s map of Deseret in Mitchell’s Universal Atlas, Meyer’s Grosser Hand-Atlas published a rare map of Deseret as originally proposed. That was not a coincidence. Meyer and his cartographer Radefeld relied on Mitchell’s atlas to produce their 1850-1854 editions of the Hand-Atlas.


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Title: “Map of the United States of America”

Creator: James H. Young (1792-18??)

Published in: Samuel Augustus Mitchell (1792-1868), A New Universal Atlas

Place: Philadelphia

Date: 1850

Fueled by emerging mass-market interest, atlases experienced a resurgence in popularity in the 1840s and 1850s. Produced for S. Augustus Mitchell’s contribution to that market by his longtime engraver and associate James H. Young, this map captured the territorial expansion of the newly-continental United States in progress. While the eastern United States might look relatively familiar—save the lack of West Virginia as a distinct state—the western territories bear only a vague similarity to the familiar state boundaries that would eventually settle. This map captured an already-reduced Utah Territory that stretched from roughly the Sierra Nevada range to the continental divide.

Note that the map erroneously called that territory by its then-defunct name of Deseret. This particular mid-1850 edition of the atlas had two U.S. maps, with each identifying the new territory by its alternate names. The United States never recognized an entity called “Deseret.” Western political events moved rather quickly at times, so it is understandable that a map prepared in early 1850 and published at the end of the year would not be able to keep up. Nonetheless, the territory which should have been labeled Utah Territory never looked like this. [link to the GIS site]


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Title: “California, Oregon, Washington, Utah, New Mexico”

Creator: Samuel Augustus Mitchell (1792-1868)

Published in: A New Universal Atlas

Publisher: Charles Desilver

Place: Philadelphia

Date: 1857

Selling atlases in the mass market was a race as often as it was a contest over accuracy and comprehensiveness. Produced rapidly for Mitchell’s Atlas Universal in 1850 by adding new boundaries to an existing base map from the previous decade, this was one of the first maps to show the new state of California. It had little else going for it. Its intellectual debt to the 1840s meant that Frémont practically authored the Great Basin. The map even identified it as the Fremont Basin to at least the 1855 edition. Over the 1850s, Mitchell updated the map, adding in subsequent editions the cities and counties that had been conspicuously absent in the rushed earlier versions.

 


 

 

 

Day at the Utah Capitol Dedicated to History in Action

ush-6695-1SALT LAKE CITY — The Utah Division of State History invites lovers of Utah history to attend Utah History Day on the Hill, Friday, January 27, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the State Capitol Rotunda.

This public event showcases history in Utah from the classroom to the archives. Learn more about hands-on history education through Utah’s National History Day program, and view a selection of prized historic maps of Utah from the 1500s to statehood. Continue reading

Utah History Day On The Hill

On Friday, January 27, thirty middle- and high-school students from Logan, Price, Layton, Salt Lake, Alpine, Orem, Beaver, and Montezuma Creek will be the featured guests at Utah History Day on the Hill. The Division of State History is thrilled to host these exceptional young people, who are participants in Utah’s National History Day program.

These youth have done extensive historical research on important topics, presenting their work in the form of exhibits, documentaries, performances, websites, or papers. They were members of Utah’s National History Day delegation this past June, traveling to Washington, D.C., to compete in this prestigious academic event.

Projects on display at the Capitol will include:

St. Eustatius: The Exploration, Encounter, and Exchange that Won the Revolution, by Jacob Simmons, Albion Middle School

Long Walk of the Navajo: The 1864 Encounter at Hwéeldi and its Impacts on Dinétah,
by Kami Atcitty, Kaia Jay, and Esperanza Lee, Albert R. Lyman Middle School

George Catlin’s Native American Encounters: A Gift of Artistic Preservation, by Maren Burgess –8th Place, Senior Individual Exhibit, National History Day 2016

The Greatest Treasure Hunt in History, by Saige Hinds, Eliza Lewis, and Daniela Meneses

The Rebirth of Literature: Shakespeare’s Encounter, Exploration, and Exchange of Ideas, by Tessa Atwood, Katie Snow, Mercedez Clifford, Zoey Kourianos, Tyler Pierce, Carbon High School

Helen Foster Snow: American Journalist in the Chinese Revolution, by Daniel Nelson and Spencer Standing, Lakeridge Junior High. 5th Place, Junior Individual Website, National History Day 2016

Utah History Day Registration

REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN

1. CHOOSE THE CORRECT CONTEST. Scroll down, looking carefully at the options below. You must select the registration link for the regional contest nearest to where you live.

2. TEACHERS complete one Teacher Registration form per school.

3. STUDENTS complete one Student Registration form per entry. This means that a group project should only be registered one time, and all members of the group must be included in that registration.

4. Remember, registration is free for History Day contests in Utah.

REGIONAL CONTESTS

Cache Regional (Cache & Box Elder Counties):

Castle Country Regional (Carbon & Emery Counties):

Central Utah Regional (Sanpete County);

Duchesne-Uintah Regional (Duchesne & Uintah Counties):

Salt Lake Regional (Salt Lake & Summit Counties):

San Juan Regional (San Juan County):

South-Central Regional (Beaver & Iron Counties):

Utah Valley Regional (Utah County):

Washington County Regional:

Weber Regional (Weber & Davis Counties)**

Davis County School District:

Ogden School District: 

Questions?  

Contact us at UtahHistoryDay@gmail.com. We will be happy to assist you!

Registration Tips

  • Registration closing dates vary. Be sure you register before the deadline for your contest.
  • Website and Historical Paper entries are due before the competition. If you are competing in either of those categories, pay attention to those deadlines. Look them up HERE.
  • If you are not sure which contest serves you, please contact us: utahhistoryday@gmail.com

Instructions for Website Students

  • You need to provide the Weebly URL for your website during registration. It should look like this: https://12345678.nhd.weebly.com.
  • If your URL has words instead of numbers, you’ll need to convert it to NHD Weebly before you register. It’s simple: Go to nhd.weebly.com  and login using your Weebly username and password. Click “Convert” and write down your new URL. If you experience issues converting your website contact nhdsupport@weebly.com.
  • Websites will lock for judging on the date specified for your contest. You will not be able to access your site during the judging period.
  • Websites will unlock after the competition, allowing you time to make revisions before the next competition.

Instructions for Historical Paper Students

  • Judges will read Historical Papers before the day of the contest.
  • You will need to mail four (4) hard copies of your paper to your contest coordinator by the due date listed for your contest in the Registration Schedule.  Please email your regional coordinator if you need their mailing address.
  • Then, plan to attend your regional competition prepared for a 5-minute judges interview about your project.

 

Utah on the National Register

NRHPBook_Page_01The National Register of Historic Places only exists because of its association with the federal National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), and it is turning 50 years old in 2016.

This book is a small selection of Utah’s contribution to historic preservation work.

Utah History Day Annual Theme

 397-096_2017_NHD_Theme_Logo_web_FNL-180x180

* Download the 2017 Theme Summary (6 pages, a good handout)
* Download the 2017 Theme Book (expanded content includes lesson plans, classroom activities, and more)
* Go to Topic Ideas

Theme Summary:

For National History Day students, the 2016-2017 academic year will be filled with research related to the theme Taking a Stand in History. The theme is broad to encourage participants to delve into history, whether it be a topic from the ancient world or the history of their own city. Students need to begin research with secondary sources to gain a broader context, then progress to finding primary sources, and finally make an argument about the effects of a topic in history.

What does it mean to take a stand? To take a stand, one must take a firm position on an issue. Historically, people have taken a stand in support of an issue, such as the demonstrators in Tiananmen Square who protested for greater freedom in China. Sometimes taking a stand involves opposing the status quo—for example, Martin Luther’s act of nailing his Ninety-Five Theses to the door of the All Saints’ Church in Wittenberg, Germany. Taking a stand could even involve fighting against a powerful movement, such as Queen Liliuokalani’s fight against annexation to maintain Hawaiian independence. These examples show well-known individuals taking a stand. How did these people defend their position?

When looking at different individuals and groups who took a stand, there are examples of those who used force, words, and economic power to make their voices heard. These people are remembered because they had an impact on history and inspired others to follow them. Remember that there is a difference between opposition and truly taking a stand. What do you think has to happen to move from opposition to taking a stand?

Can a group of people take a stand? Yes. Think back to how the Indian National Congress protested to end British Control of India. Or look even further into the past at the Magna Carta, considered one of the world’s most important documents. It would never have been written if it were not for a group of rebellious English barons who took a stand against an all-powerful King John in 1215. How did American colonists, many of them women, take a stand against King George III? In the more recent past, numerous nations came together to stand up for the rights of individuals after World War II. Why and how did the United Nations agree to the Declaration of Human Rights in 1948? What can be accomplished when nations come together to stand up for individual rights? Perhaps you could explore these questions and more by writing a paper.

Grassroots movements can become something more through the dedication of followers. Think of the Temperance Movement during the Progressive Era. Although the movement for temperance began much earlier, the Progressive Era sparked a revival that led to the 18th Amendment and a 13-year prohibition of alcohol. Why was this issue brought back into the spotlight by the Progressive Era?

Why was this movement successful? As historians, you must look at the lasting legacy of the actions of individuals and groups. What 5 Taking a Stand in History happened because of their stand? What changes occurred in the short-term? How about the long-term? Did they leave the world, their country, or their town better or worse?

Many times those who take a stand emerge as great historical leaders. George Washington was a gifted leader who influenced the lives of many. He took numerous stands throughout his military and political career. Yes, he led the Continental Army in the American Revolution, but Washington also took a stand against disease by inoculating his army against smallpox during a time when many questioned the validity of this procedure. Why did he decide to go against the mindset of the time? How do you think this has shaped his lasting legacy?

Often those who take a stand have to overcome opposition. Like the soldiers of George Washington’s time, many Americans feared Jonas Salk’s polio vaccine in the twentieth century. How did Salk seek to prove the validity of his medicine?

How did his stand help shape the future of medicine? Times of crisis and war often lead to conflicts between the rights of the people and those of the government. Consider the Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798, the suspension of the writ of habeus corpus during the U.S. Civil War, or the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. Often these situations led to court cases where an individual or group challenged the right of the government to restrict liberties. There are many case studies of people standing up to protect liberties. John Peter Zenger, Lucy Stone, William Lloyd Garrison, Eugene V. Debs, and John Lewis all took stands. How does the judicial process provide an avenue to take a stand?

One of the most visible ways to take a stand is related to military action. Alexander the Great, Charlemagne, Joan of Arc, Napoleon I, and Douglas MacArthur are just a few who have led armies in taking a stand. In contrast, you might consider why an individual might take a stand against military action. For example, how did Siegfried Sassoon, a British soldier in World War I, use poetry to take a stand? What consequences did he face as a result?

Taking a stand does not necessarily need to involve military force or a political enemy. In the late 1800s, a group of French artists rebelled against the Salons, a popular venue for artists to display their work. They felt rejected and unwanted so they put on their own shows and were later known as the Impressionists. What legacy did these artists leave? Do you think the Impressionist Movement inspired later artists and other movements? You might decide to tackle those questions by creating an exhibit or a documentary.

Sometimes the best way to take a stand is to walk away. Russia has always had a wonderful reverence for the ballet world, but the ballet dancers of the Soviet Era felt limited by government policies that restricted creative expression. As a result, some dancers, including Rudolf Nureyev and Mikhail Baryshnikov, defected to other countries. How did their stand influence artist expression? How were they affected as individuals? Perhaps you want to explore this topic through a performance.

Many women have taken a powerful stand in history. Consider Queen Elizabeth I’s stand against marriage or Catherine the Great’s efforts to bring Enlightenment ideas to the Russian Empire. Alice Paul took a stand to push the women’s suffrage movement into the national spotlight in the early twentieth century. How was she able to garner so much attention? How did Eleanor Roosevelt respond when the Daughters of the American Revolution refused to let Marian Anderson perform in their concert hall? Can you think of other examples of women taking a stand throughout history?

What happens when taking a stand fails to result in an immediate change? Often many people and groups must take a stand to bring change to a society. Any movement for social and political change can require years. Ending slavery, establishing child labor laws, and fighting against Jim Crow segregation laws and prohibition took many attempts at change. What part has the media played in such instances? How can a failure later become a success?

Sometimes failure is temporary. In 1892, the People’s Party, or Populist Party, articulated its goals in a document known as the Omaha Platform. While none of its goals (a graduated income tax, direct election of senators) were achieved in 1892, many of the ideas were carried on by Progressive Reformers and enacted in the next 50 years. Looking back through history, are there similar examples where a group might have failed initially?

What happens when someone fails to take a stand? Diplomatic history includes many examples of nations that refused to get involved in events outside their borders. Nations must face challenging decisions of when to intervene in another country’s affairs, and when to be isolationists and stay out.

When deciding on a topic for your NHD project, it is helpful to think outside the box. One way to find such a topic is to look at a well-known historical event, such as the Boston Tea Party, and dig a little deeper. Most of us know about the Boston Tea Party and that the Sons of Liberty were a part of its planning and execution, but have you heard of Ebenezer Stevens? How did he play a role in the rebellion? What were the consequences of his actions? Perhaps you might want to explore this topic by creating a website.

Another way to find a new spin on an old topic is to look to your own backyard. Many of us know that Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King, Jr. played significant roles in the civil rights movement, but are there individuals from your hometown who played a role? How do you think the small town movements influenced these movements at a national level? By digging beneath the surface of many famous historical events, researchers can find a treasure trove of fascinating stories of people and groups who took a stand in history.

Using these questions, students can choose a topic that interests them and has a strong connection to the Taking a Stand in History theme. Happy researching!

 

Next Year’s Theme:  Conflict and Compromise in History

Welcome!

What is Utah History Day?

Utah History Day is Utah’s official National History Day affiliate. Formerly called Utah History Fair, this program has operated continuously in Utah since 1980.  Last year, more than 5,000 Utah students in 4th through 12th grade participated in History Day, learning how to conduct real historical research and then create a final project that showcases their work.  Students present their projects in a series of contests beginning at the school or district level and advancing through regional and state competitions. Utah’s top entries qualify to compete at the National History Day competition in Washington, D.C., each June.

Why History Day?

UHD Home Page PictureHistory Day brings history to life for students as they discover the past by choosing a topic from local, national, or world history, conducting their own research, and drawing reasoned conclusions based on historical evidence. Students who participate in History Day do much more than memorize facts from a textbook, they develop their abilities in reading, writing, critical thinking, and creative presentation. History Day builds a host of college and career ready skills while inspiring students to strive for excellence. 

Learn more about students’ great experiences!   

Utah History Day is operated by the Utah Division of State History at the historic Rio Grande Depot in Salt Lake City, home of the State History Research Center and Collections, the Utah State Historical Society, the Utah Historical Quarterly, and the Utah State Archives. We appreciate your excitement, commitment, and passion for this program! 

UHD Get Started Final 2spaceContact Us: 
Utah History Day
Division of State History
300 S. Rio Grande Street
Salt Lake City, UT 84101
Phone: 801.245.7253
Email: UtahHistoryDay@gmail.com

Thank You to our Statewide Partners!

UHD slcc_logo_color_original UHD- Civic and Character education UHD- Utah Humanities Logo
UHD- Utah State Logo.svg UHD- UVU Logo UHD- Weber State Logo
UHDusu eastern fixed UHD- Snow College

 

National History Day (NHD) is a non-profit education organization that offers year-long academic programs to students around the world. Students enter research-based projects into contests at the local and affiliate levels, where the top student projects have the opportunity to advance to the National Contest at the University of Maryland at College Park.UHD- NHD Logo

Utah History Day in the News!

Utah Students Excel at National History Day Competition, KCSG Television, 17 June 2016. http://www.kcsg.com/view/full_story/27211225/article-Utah-students-excel-at-National-History-Day-competition?

St. George Students Head to National History Competition, St. George Daily Spectrum, 26 May, 2016.  http://www.thespectrum.com/story/news/2016/05/26/st-george-students-head-national-history-competition/84945114/

Utah History Day Showcases student research and presentations, The Pyramid, 14 April, 2016
http://www.heraldextra.com/sanpete-county/news/utah-history-day-showcases-student-research-and-presentations/article_b8c90892-1b8b-5f17-a0dc-b0dea2c6dd63.html

Seven Local Historians Qualify for National Competition, ETV10 News, 26 April, 2016
http://etv10news.com/seven-local-historians-qualify-for-national-competition/ Eight

Carbon High Students Compete at National History Fair, ETV10 News, July 21, 2015
http://etv10news.com/eight-carbon-high-students-compete-at-national-history-fair/

Two Catholic Students Advance to National History Day 
Competition, Intermountain Catholic, May 8, 2015
http://www.icatholic.org/article/two-catholic-students-advance-to-national-history-day-0117806

Layton Students Headed to National History Fair, Ogden Standard Examiner, May 6, 2015
http://www.standard.net/Education/2015/05/08/Students-Headed-to-National-History-Fair.html

Legacy and Leadership at History Fair, 
San Juan Record, March 25, 2015
http://www.sjrnews.com/view/full_story/26539375/article-Legacy-and-Leadership-at-History-Fair?instance=home_news_1st_right

Carbon, Emery, and Grand Students Compete in History Day Fair, ETV10 News, March 19, 2015
http://etv10news.com/carbon-emery-and-grand-students-compete-in-history-day-fair/

Students Ponder Leadership and Legacy in History at Utah History Day Contest in Price, ETV10 News, March 6, 2015
http://etv10news.com/students-ponder-leadership-and-legacy-in-history-at-utah-history-day-contest-in-price/

Local Students Learn, Compete, and Explore at National History Day, ETV10 News, July 1, 2014
http://etv10news.com/local-students-learn-compete-and-explore-at-national-history-day/

Student Competition Takes Historical Look at Rights and Responsibilities, Deseret News, April 24, 2014
http://www.deseretnews.com/article/865601664/Student-competition-takes-historical-look-at-rights-and-responsibilities.html?pg=2

Kaysville Sixth Graders Headed to National History Contest,
Standard Examiner, May 7, 2014
http://www.standard.net/Education/2014/05/12/Kaysville-sixth-graders-headed-to-national-history-contest.html

Utah Students Do Well at National History Day, June 20, 2013
http://www.usu.edu/ust/index.cfm?article=52483

Olivia Baird Selected to Participate in US Freedom Pavilion Grand Opening
Deseret News, March 5, 2013
http://www.deseretnews.com/article/865574930/Orem-ninth-grader-Olivia-Baird-chosen-to-participate-in-US-Freedom-Pavilion-grand-opening.html

Utah History Day on KBYU Eleven Community Connection
Utah History Day is honored to appear on KBYU Eleven Community Connection.  Click here to see the interview.

Utah History Fair Receives Official Citation from the Utah State Legislature
March 8, 2012
http://www.usu.edu/ust/index.cfm?article=50876

Hannah  Anderson takes 1st at the Kenneth E. Behring NHD Contest,  2011
http://news.hjnews.com/news/article_06710dca-9af2-11e0-b04e-001cc4c002e0.html

Mayra Payne takes 9th at the Kenneth E. Behring NHD 
Contest, 2011

http://www.heraldextra.com/news/local/north/alpine/article_8fd85cc0-0cc0-53bf-999c-30281ff4101b.html

Helper Junior High students participate in the Kenneth E. Behring NHD Contest, 2011
http://www.sunad.com/index.php?tier=1&article_id=22152

Midvale Middle School prepares for the Kenneth E. Behring NHD Contest, 2011
http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/news/51933681-78/competition-courtney-eighth-hansen.html.csp#disqus_thread

History of the Utah History Fair via the Utah Humanities Council’s Beehive Archive, 2011
http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/founding-utah-history-fair/id307267067?i=89201907

Great work Natalie Howe and Sadie Topham, 2010
http://www.usu.edu/ust/index.cfm?article=47847

The Utah History Fair and Nicholas Demas receives the Utah Humanities Council’s Human Ties Award, 2010
http://www.usu.edu/ust/index.cfm?article=47108