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Utah Historical Quarterly Current Issue


Volume 84, Number 4 (Fall 2016 Issue):


Published since 1928, the Utah Historical Quarterly is the state’s premier history journal and the source for reliable, engaging Utah history. Join the Historical Society for your own copy.

Each issue of the Utah Historical Quarterly is accompanied with rich web supplements that introduce readers to sources, photos, interviews, and other engaging material. These “extras” are located at history.utah.gov/uhqextras.

WEB EXTRAS: See here 


IN THIS ISSUE


It’s often noted that the work of a historian—patching together fragments of information to arrive at an understanding of the past, however limited—is like the work of a detective. Just so, as historians assemble their puzzles of documents, objects, and memories, they ask questions about motivations, about cause and effect, and even about what simply happened. The articles in this issue of Utah Historical Quarterly—as they reconsider accepted explanations and ponder how big events can affect personal lives—are full of such inquiries.

Our lead essay draws on Jedediah Smith’s record discovered in 1967 and published in 1977—more than two decades after Dale L. Morgan’s classic Jedediah Smith and the Opening of the West—to detail the famed 1826 and 1827 southwest expeditions. Smith’s travels helped to map terra incognita, as other historians have shown, and perhaps explain a puzzling mystery: what happened to the Paiute village first encountered by Smith in 1826 but abandoned upon his return the following year? Edward Leo Lyman’s close reading of the record suggests that Jed Smith’s narrative is intertwined with those of two of his contemporaries, James Ohio Pattie and Ewing Young. Though Smith is well known by scholars and general readers of the American West, this piece offers a welcome reevaluation of his travels and provides surprising revelations.

In April 1857, Felix Marion Jones traveled with his family as a toddler, from Arkansas to Utah Territory, where his family became victims of the superlative tragedy at Mountain Meadows. Jones survived the massacre but endured loss beyond description: first his parents, then the woman who cared for him after their death, and even his identity. After the federal government returned Jones and his fellow survivors to Arkansas, the boy experienced a difficult childhood. As a teenager, Jones struck out on his own for Texas and eventually had a family of his own. One of his posterity, a favorite grandson named Milam “Mike” Jones, heard F. M.’s memories and, in 2008, passed them on to the historian Will Bagley. This is a story of loss, family, and renewal that spans centuries.

During the hottest years of the Cold War, the U.S. government—especially the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC)—conducted above-ground, atmospheric tests of nuclear weapons at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Although representatives of the AEC and others soft-pedaled the dangers of these tests, they had devastating effects upon many people and animals living downwind from the NTS. Our third article explores how employees and institutions of the federal government dealt with the consequences of nuclear fallout.

When designated in 1964, Canyonlands National Park was to be “built” in the tradition of Yellowstone or the Grand Canyon—lodges, restaurants, and roads directing visitors to the park’s inner sanctum. Within fifteen years the Canyonlands General Management Plan called for a preserved landscape devoid of the easy-access roads planned into the Chesler Park, Grabens, and Needles areas. Our fourth essay details the forces at play—the wartime shortfall in funds, the rise of environmental sensibilities, the ideologies of park superintendents—and the sense of loss experienced by some. The history of Canyonlands is a reminder that all landscapes are products of contingent forces and of contending voices. Even the look and experience of a most dramatic and remote landscape is not inevitable or fixed.

 


ARTICLES

Rethinking Jedediah S. Smith’s Southwestern Expeditions
By Edward Leo Lyman

Touching History: A Grandson’s Memories of Felix Marion Jones and the Massacre at Mountain Meadows
By Will Bagley

“Damned Stupid Old Guinea Pigs”: The Cover-Up of the “Dirty” Harry Nuclear Test
By Katherine Good

Closing the Road to Chesler Park: Why Access to Canyonlands National Park Remains Limited
By Clyde L. Denis


BOOK REVIEWS

David B. Danbom, ed., Bridging the Distance: Common Issues of the Rural West. Reviewed by R. Douglas Hurt

Marian Wardle and Sarah E. Boehme, eds., Branding the American West: Paintings and Films, 1900-1950. Reviewed by James R. Swensen

Richard L. Saunders, ed., Dale Morgan on the Mormons: Collected Works Part 2, 1949-1970. Reviewed by Curt Bench

Diana L. Ahmad, Success Depends on the Animals: Emigrants, Livestock, and Wild Animals on the Overland Trails, 1840-1869. Reviewed by Jeff Nichols


BOOK NOTICES

James A. Toronto, Eric R. Dursteler, and Michael W. Homer, Mormons in the Piazza: History of the Latter-day Saints in Italy

Martha Bradley-Evans, Glorious in Persecution: Joseph Smith, American Prophet, 1839-1844

 

NHPA 50 Year Anniversary

Join the nationwide celebration for the 50th Anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) in 2016. This Act transformed the face of communities throughout the United States and Utah by establishing a framework and incentives to preserve historic buildings, landscapes, and archaeological sites.  Coordinated through Preservation50.org, the nationwide celebration is designed to inform and engage all ages and backgrounds in this significant law’s effects on local communities and history. Since 1966, the NHPA has shaped preservation efforts on America’s history and culture while generating positive social and economic impacts. In 2015, the Utah State Historic Preservation Office (formed in 1973) gathered stakeholders to organize a year of events and to gather engaging stories and media for the celebration.

This website is a portal to a year of events and activities that cover all corners of Utah.

Events Calendar     Media     Preservation Apps     Links     Partners

shipwreckgsl

Shipwreck at the Great Salt Lake

 

Board of State History

Meeting Agenda

Thursday, January 19, 2017, 12:00 – 3:00 pm

Rio Grande Depot, Board Room, 300 South Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City, UT

TIME:  Noon – working lunch for Board members, hosted by State History

12:15 p.m. – WELCOME – Dina Blaes, Chair

October – December State History program accomplishments

Brad Westwood (5 min)
1. Strategic Plan to the Utah Museum of History, Heritage and Arts – Timeline & Essential Steps
2. Utah Drawn:  An Exhibition of Rare Maps.  Displayed at the Utah Capitol, 4th Floor, opens January 27, 2017

Roger Roper – Historic Preservation (5 min)
1. Community preservation: continued coordination with other cultural/heritage agencies and organizations to better coordinate the delivery of services to communities.
2. Grant Management transition (with Debbie’s retirement, creation of online database, etc.)
3. Utah Heritage Traditions: moving forward with getting several documented for designation in the fall.

Wendy Rex-Atzet – History Day (5 min)
1. History Day on the Hill – report
2. Spring Contests – invite board members and help us solicit judges

Doug Misner – Library and Collections (5 min)
1. Improving ability to manage and care for the collection
2. Update on the selection of a new collection management system (CMS).

Improving public access to the collection
1. Update on the implementation of our new public access catalog.
2. New digital asset management system implemented by University of Utah.
3. Hired part time Reference Librarian.

Outreach and partnerships
1. Participated in Watch & Talk lecture series hosted by the Division of Arts and Museums.
2. Created an artifact display for the renaming ceremony at the Central Utah Veterans Home in Payson.

Arie Leeflang – Antiquities (5 min)
1. Veteran’s Memorial Database & Story Map.
2. Over 15,000 records have been data-entered for the BLM, to improve their management of archaeological resources.
3.  GIS
4.  Geo Cortex

Jed Rogers, Holly George – Utah Historical Quarterly (5 min)
1. New UHQ publishing and marketing initiative.
2. Contents of the winter UHQ issue.
3. World War I Commission.

Kevin Fayles – Communications (5 min)
1. Webstats and social media.
2. Burial records.
3. Emergency management planning (FEMA PA, Annex, etc,)

ACTION ITEMS 

  1. Approval of the October 27, 2016 Board of State History Retreat minutes – Dina Blaes
    (Board motion required) (3 min)
  2. National Register of Historic Places Nominations – Cory Jensen (25 min)
    (Board motion required)
    Summaries of National Register of Historic Places Nominations
    a) The Ballard-Sego Coal Mine Historic District in Grand County, Utah
    b) The River Heights Sinclair Station
  3. Request for removal from National Register – Cory Jensen (5 min)
    (No Board motion required)
    a) Verd’s Fruit Market Complex in Orem (demolished)
  4. Administrative Rules due for Five Year Review with Dept. of Administrative Rules – Alycia Aldrich
    (Board motion required) (10 min)
    a) R455-1, Adjudicative Proceedings
    b) R455-12, Computerized Record of Cemeteries, Burial Locations and Plots, and Granting Matching Funds

DISCUSSION ITEMS

  1. Committee reports – David Rich Lewis, David Richardson, Steve Olsen, Michael Homer (20 min)
  2. Proposed Museum for History, Heritage and Arts update – Dina Blaes, Brad Westwood (15 min)
  3. Legislative briefing
    a) 250th Anniversary Year of the Nation – Brad Westwood (5 min)
    b) Historic Districts, Tax Credits – Roger Roper (5 min)
    c) WWI funding proposal – Kevin Fayles (5 min)
  4. Budget briefing from the Department of Heritage and Arts – Tenielle Young, Jim Grover (15 min)
  5. 2017 outreach and events to include Board members – Kevin Fayles (5 min)OTHER BUSINESS

Annual Disclosure Forms (2 min)
Board Photo (5 minutes)

NEXT MEETING:  April 20, 2017, 12:00 pm – 3:00 pm

ADJOURN

Utah History Day Registration

REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN

1. CHOOSE THE CORRECT CONTEST. Scroll down, looking carefully at the options below. You must select the registration link for the regional contest nearest to where you live.

2. TEACHERS complete one Teacher Registration form per school.

3. STUDENTS complete one Student Registration form per entry. This means that a group project should only be registered one time, and all members of the group must be included in that registration.

4. Remember, registration is free for History Day contests in Utah.

REGIONAL CONTESTS

Cache Regional (Cache & Box Elder Counties):

Castle Country Regional (Carbon & Emery Counties):

Central Utah Regional (Sanpete County);

Duchesne-Uintah Regional (Duchesne & Uintah Counties):

Salt Lake Regional (Salt Lake & Summit Counties):

San Juan Regional (San Juan County):

South-Central Regional (Beaver & Iron Counties):

Utah Valley Regional (Utah County):

Washington County Regional:

Weber Regional (Weber & Davis Counties)**

Davis County School District:

Ogden School District: 

Questions?  

Contact us at UtahHistoryDay@gmail.com. We will be happy to assist you!

Registration Tips

  • Registration closing dates vary. Be sure you register before the deadline for your contest.
  • Website and Historical Paper entries are due before the competition. If you are competing in either of those categories, pay attention to those deadlines. Look them up HERE.
  • If you are not sure which contest serves you, please contact us: utahhistoryday@gmail.com

Instructions for Website Students

  • You need to provide the Weebly URL for your website during registration. It should look like this: https://12345678.nhd.weebly.com.
  • If your URL has words instead of numbers, you’ll need to convert it to NHD Weebly before you register. It’s simple: Go to nhd.weebly.com  and login using your Weebly username and password. Click “Convert” and write down your new URL. If you experience issues converting your website contact nhdsupport@weebly.com.
  • Websites will lock for judging on the date specified for your contest. You will not be able to access your site during the judging period.
  • Websites will unlock after the competition, allowing you time to make revisions before the next competition.

Instructions for Historical Paper Students

  • Judges will read Historical Papers before the day of the contest.
  • You will need to mail four (4) hard copies of your paper to your contest coordinator by the due date listed for your contest in the Registration Schedule.  Please email your regional coordinator if you need their mailing address.
  • Then, plan to attend your regional competition prepared for a 5-minute judges interview about your project.

 

Utah on the National Register

NRHPBook_Page_01The National Register of Historic Places only exists because of its association with the federal National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), and it is turning 50 years old in 2016.

This book is a small selection of Utah’s contribution to historic preservation work.

Historic Contexts

Historic contexts are a formal tool to  help agencies, consultants, and the public to understand and assess the range of variation within a certain region, period, or resource type. These documents form a strong foundation for assessing the significance of a cultural resource for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places. The Utah State Historic Preservation Office (UT-SHPO) is happy to include existing but hard to find resources on this website, and will be expanded as new contexts are made available. For many of these documents below there are additional materials at the Utah Division of State History’s office at 300 S. Rio Grande St., Salt Lake City, Utah.

The National Park Service’s National Register Bulletins provide the core description on how to develop and employ a historic context, so please be sure to visit their website for more information. Specifically, Barbara Wyatt of the National Park Service created a short white paper that succinctly describes what is in a historic context and how to use it, and it can be found by clicking here.

If you have any questions or comments on these please contact the UT-SHPO’s resident context wrangler: Elizabeth Hora-Cook at ehora@utah.gov

Broad Overview Contexts (Multi-Resource Type)

Architectural Contexts

General Domestic or Other Contexts

Public Buildings Contexts

Religious Architectural Contexts

Industrial or Engineering Related Contexts

United States Forest Service in Utah Contexts


Archaeological Contexts*

*Some reports above might have been redacted per state or federal data protections on archaeological site locations.


Ethnographic Contexts

Board of State History Retreat Agenda

Board of State History Retreat
Thursday, October 27, 2016

9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Thomas S. Monson Center (formerly the Enos Wall Mansion)
411 East S. Temple, Salt Lake City

9:00 a.m.                     WELCOME – Dina Blaes, Board Chair

9:15 a.m.                     Quarterly program accomplishments – staff

9:45 a.m.                     Refining Board Committees & the Committee- to-Board process – Brad Westwood

10:00 a.m.                   Break into Committees:

  • Utah State Historical Society Committee (Chair: David Rich Lewis)
  • Major Planning, Gifts & Awards Committee (Chair: Mike Homer)
  • Historic Preservation & Archaeology Committee (Chair: David Richardson)
  • Library, Collections & Digitization (Chair: Steve Olsen)

11:15 a.m.                   BREAK

11:30 a.m.                   Group photo

11:35 a.m.                   LUNCH/DISCUSSION/ACTION ITEMS

12:30 p.m.                   ACTION ITEMS

  • Delisting of National Register of Historic Places buildings – Cory Jensen
    Demolished buildings: (no vote required)
    – Thomas Cunningham House (NRIS #84002250), Park City, Summit County
    – Downing Apartments (NRIS #87002160), Ogden, Weber County
    – Lehi Commercial & Savings Bank (NRIS #98001537), Lehi, Utah County
    – Morgan Elementary School (NRIS #86000737), Morgan, Morgan County
    – North Ogden Elementary School (NRIS #85000822), North Ogden, Weber County
    – Plant Auto Company Building (NRIS #04001129), Richmond, Cache County
    – Rose Apartments (NRIS #87002160), Ogden, Weber County
    – Sidney Stevens House (NRIS #77001326), Ogden, Weber County
    Loss of integrity: (vote required)
    – Hyrum Stake Tithing Office (NRIS ##85000251), Hyrum, Cache County
  • Approval of 2017 Board meeting dates  Alycia Aldrich
    January 19th, April 20th, July 20th, October 26th

1:20 p.m.                     BREAK

1:30 p.m.                     TRAINING

  • Board Duties, Bylaws and Statutory AuthorityThom Roberts
  • National Park Service Walk Through Historic Buildings – Dina Blaes/Cory Jensen

2:30 p.m.                     DISCUSSION ITEMS

  • Proposed Utah History, Heritage and Arts Museum – Dina Blaes
  • Closing remarks –  Brad Westwood

3:00 p.m.                     ADJOURN

Rural Utah, Western Issues – 64th Annual Utah State History Conference Program

Online registration is now closed.  Walk in registrations will be accepted as space allows. 

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Conference at a Glance

Conference Workshops, Seminars
Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016
9:00 a.m. – noon
4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Rio Grande Depot
300 S. Rio Grande Street
Salt Lake City, UT

9:00 a.m. –  noon Introduction to Oral History (Zephyr Room) (WORKSHOP IS FULL)
(Co-sponsored by Utah Humanities)
9:00 a.m. –  noon Historic Preservation Workshop (West Lecture Room) (WORKSHOP IS FULL)
9:00 a.m. – noon Well, isn’t that Spatial?”: GIS, Mapping Historical and Cultural Resources (Utah State Archives Training Room – 346 S. Rio Grande Street) (WORKSHOP IS FULL)
4:00 p.m – 6:00 p.m. Teacher Training Prehistory Workshop (Zephyr Room)

 

Conference Panels, Sessions
Friday, Sept. 30, 2016
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Utah Cultural Celebration Center
1355 West 3100 South
West Valley, UT

9:00 – 10:15 a.m. Plenary Session: Historical Perspectives on the Public Lands Debate in the American WestDr. Gregory Smoak, Dr. Leisl Carr Childers, Dr. Joseph E. Taylor III (Great Hall)
10:30 – 11:45 a.m. World War I in Utah (Room 101)
Early Rural Utah in the Uinta Basin (Room 102)
  Evaluating The Awkward State of Utah (Room 104)
  Accessing Statewide Heritage Resources (Room 105)
  Bringing the Art of Decorative Paper Cutting into the Twenty-first Century (Board Room)
12 – 1:30 p.m. Keynote: Quicksand, Cactus, and the Power of History in Polarized Times: Bringing Juanita Brooks and Dale L. Morgan Back into Our ConversationDr. Patty Limerick (Great Hall)
1:45 – 3:00 p.m. What Role Do Historians Play in Public Land and Water Policy? (Rooms 101 & 102)
  New Methods, Historical Innovation (Room 104)
  Evolving Small Towns (Room 105)
  The Personal and the Political (Great Hall – west)
  Lark Public Event (Great Hall – east)
  Lark Oral Histories (Board Room)
3:15 – 4:30 p.m. Rural Utah, National Destinations (Rooms 101 & 102)
  Voices from the Desert: Rural Issues in Southeastern Utah (Room 104)
  Land Stewardship in Northern Utah (Room 105)
  Industrial and Natural Landscapes (Great Hall – west)
  Lark Public Event (Great Hall – east)
  Lark Oral Histories (Board Room)

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Conference Tour (TOUR IS FULL)
Saturday, Oct. 1, 2016
9:00 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Hosted by Fort Douglas Military Museum.   Battle or massacre? Historians still debate the events of that cold winter day in January 1863 when soldiers from Camp Douglas attacked a village of Shoshone on the Bear River near the Utah-Idaho border. Follow the route of the soldiers as the marched north from Camp Doulas and walk the site of the actual battle. An informative and thought provoking day exploring Utah’s historic past.

Cost:     $65 per person (includes transportation, lunch and field trip booklet)

**Please note that a separate paid registration is required for this tour and is not part of the free conference.  Please call 801-581-1251 or email admin@fortdouglas.org to register. (TOUR IS FULL, NO MORE REGISTRATIONS ARE BEING ACCEPTED)


Thank you to our conference sponsors:

American Institute of Architects (Utah chapter), American Planning Association (Utah chapter), American West Center (U of U), Ames Construction, Charles Redd Center for Western Studies (BYU), Chevron, Fort Douglas Military Museum, Governor’s Office of Economic Development, J. Willard Marriott Library (U of U), LDS Church History Department, National Park Service, Resonance Printing Solutions, U of U History Department, USU History Department, Utah Cultural Celebration Center, Utah Humanities, Utah Westerners.

UHQ State History Research

State History Research

At State History, we’re all about helping you conduct professional or personal research in a quick, efficient manner. We know that you want to find what you’re looking for so you can move on with your research. Check out some of our most popular research tools and resources:

History

  • Publications Search – online access to all of State History’s publications, including back issues of Utah Historical Quarterly, all twenty-nine county histories, and the full set of Beehive History, Utah Preservation, and other periodicals
  • Utah History to Go – a comprehensive online course for Utah history, containing articles, exhibits, and historic photographs
  • I Love History – an engaging resource for kids and grade-school students

Historic Preservation & Archeology

Collections and Databases

External resources

Research Libraries and Archives

Online Primary Sources

  • Utah Digital Newspapers – first statewide newspaper digitization program to pass 1 million pages in content, this site has papers ranging from the 1850s to 2010
  • Library of Congress – the research arm of Congress and the largest library in the world, with millions of books, recordings, photographs, maps, and manuscripts in its collections
  • Highway 89 Collection – online exhibit of photographs, manuscripts, and printed items
  • Western Waters Digital Library – digital collection of resources on water in the West
  • Utah American Indian Digital Archive – portal to digital resources about the history and culture of Utah’s native peoples
  • Ancestry – an online resource for family trees and related genealogical information, as well as historical photos and records

Museums and Other Local Resources

Oral Histories

The Southern Utah Oral History Project

Research Requests

We sometimes receive research requests and inquiries from press officers, historians, researchers, public and private organizations, and interested citizens. Although we cannot devote a great deal of time to these inquiries, we are happy to direct individuals and organizations to salient resources. On occasion, we are able to provide more involved research assistance. Let us know how we can assist by contacting:

Utah Historical Quarterly editors at uhq@utah.gov or (801) 245–7209 or (801) 245–7257

When information from our collections or from our editors is published or otherwise used in print or online, please use the source/courtesy line: Utah State Historical Society and/or Utah Historical Quarterly. Please also refer readers to our homepage: uhq.utah.gov.

Appreciate our services and collections? Love Utah History? Show your support by becoming a member of the Utah State Historical Society today at www.heritage.utah.gov/history/become-a-member or by “liking” us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/UtahStateHistory.

 

Historical Resources for Grade School Students (see also Utah History Day)

Thank you for contacting Utah State History. The standard seventh-grade school text on Utah history is The Utah Journey, published by Gibbs Smith. For even younger students, we recommend State History's website “I Love History” (ilovehistory.utah.gov) as an engaging resource for Utah history. A fun book for kids is Will Bagley and Pat Bagley's This is the Place: A Crossroads of Utah's Past (2001). High-school and college students would benefit from Thomas G. Alexander's Utah, The Right Place (2003). An interesting blog on Utah history, suitable for 4th and 7th grade-age students, is “The Mystery of Utah History”. The blog's creator, Lynn Arave, was for many years a reporter for the Deseret News.

For additional resources, we highly recommend consulting State History's homepage for a number of good links and resources (http://heritage.utah.gov/history/research-history). If you are interested in specific topics, events, or people in Utah history, visit “Utah History To Go” and our digitized collection of the Utah Historical Quarterly and other Utah State Historical Society publications at uhq.utah.gov.

The Division of State History is proud to operate Utah History Day, the National History Day affiliate for Utah students in grades 4-12. History Day brings history to life for kids by giving them the tools to become amateur historians. Kids learn how to do real historical research, then create a final project that showcases their work. Projects are judged in a series of competitions that culminate in annual state and national contests. Visit our website (Utahhistoryfair.weebly.com/research-resources.html) for history resources helpful to kids working on their projects. To contact the state coordinator, email utahhistoryday@gmail.com.