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Archaeology Publications

Are you interested in Utah Archaeology? Utah Archaeology is an annual publication of USAS, UPAC, and the Utah Division of State History. The journal focuses on prehistoric and historic archaeological research relevant to Utah.

You will also be able to view all publications related to Utah Archaeology.

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Modernism at the University of Utah

Editors’ Note: Bim Oliver, author of “Modernism on Campus: Architecture at the University of Utah, 1945-1975,” offers here information on mid-century university building plans that never materialized. Through the process of researching modernism at the University of Utah, Oliver compiled a list of quotations that reveal a light, humorous side of university officials–and these are reproduced below. Finally, we offer additional photographs that didn’t make it into the published article.


Projects That Didn’t Materialize

Like many of the buildings in the post-World War II era, Merrill Engineering was constructed in phases.

The building that exists constitutes the first three phases of the project, completed in relatively short order starting in the late 1950s. But the original concept for the engineering center also envisioned both a circular auditorium and a six-story classroom building. The former was dropped early on, but the classroom building remained an integral part of the center’s design as “Phase IV.” It was never constructed, however, due to lack of funding. Image 3

As the Olpin Union was nearing completion, the Campus Planning Committee contemplated the construction of a “campanile” (bell tower) in the open space just south of the new building. “The campus badly needs some symbol indicative of education that will complete the triangle within the city,” the committee observed in 1958, “i.e., the capitol dome represents State government, the temple, religion and perhaps a campanile to represent education, and which can be plainly seen just as the other two elements are.” Although the campanile was never built, the Social and Behavioral Sciences Building eventually served as the landmark envisioned by the committee. Image 4

The bookstore today occupies the same site that it occupied in the years following World War II. Busy as it is today, it was considered of secondary significance by university planners. More to the point, they felt that its location was better suited for “a heavy use faculty, administrative or academic use.” So they considered two primary alternatives: a new building north of the Union and a structure between the Union and Orson Spencer Hall, “designed as an underground facility, with the floor level approximately the same as the level of the major academic mall.” Due to funding limitations, however, neither was constructed.

As noted in the related article, the primary funder of Pioneer Memorial Theater, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, asked the architects to draw up plans for Pioneer Memorial Theater as a structure that replicated the Salt Lake Theater that had been located downtown for several decades. An early drawing shows this replica that was later dispensed with in favor of a more Modernist design that better accommodated the technical requirements of the theater. Image 5

There were other proposals—some conceptual, some refined—that would have significantly changed the character of campus:

  • Two campus planning maps from 1959 and 1960 showed the library as an octagon and a circle, respectively, rather than the square that exists today. As the design was finalized, administrators suggested etching inspirational quotations into the cast-stone panels that enclosed the library, an idea rejected by the architects.
  • Early site plans and renderings of the plaza to the east of the Social and Behavioral Sciences Building envisioned an elaborate fountain.
  • An architect’s rendering of the Eccles Health Sciences Library included an expansive plaza between the library to the east, the Medical Center to the north, and the College of Pharmacy to the south.
  • Options for the medical towers and townhouses south of the Medical Center included the use of Sunset Tower (recently completed at 40 South 900 East), as well as a much larger complex on the current site that would have incorporated a varying configuration of high rises and lower “garden type” apartments.
  • In the late 1960s, as the university sought to increase its supply of married student housing, planners considered developing over 200 units at the mouth of Red Butte Canyon.
  • A primary goal during the post-World War II era was to concentrate academic buildings near the center of campus. One concept considered for achieving this goal was to construct two 14-story structures—one for the Chemistry Department and one for the Physics Department. As one planner noted, however, “Shoehorning two such units into that restricted area would be most difficult, as well as visually unpleasant.”
  • Early renderings and models for the Medical Center, Special Events Center, College of Pharmacy, and Physics Building reflect significantly different design ideas than those that were actually constructed.

Humorous Quotes from Author’s Research Notes

  • “This will be a place where future wives will be trained on how to turn out the hash without burning it.” (W.J. O’Connor, chair of the Board of Regents, at the October 1951 groundbreaking for the Sterling Sill Home Living Center)
  • “At an earlier date, I received a memo from you posing the hazard that the rocks to the east of the Union Building and Orson Spencer Hall could be if we were to have a riot on campus.” (Memo from B. Blain Bradford to Bruce H. Jensen in July of 1970)
  • “Most people would agree that the fountain (Tanner Fountain across the plaza from the library) seems to be attracting the ‘undesirable’ hippie type clientele who are oftentimes quite dirty and unkempt.” (Memo from J Elroy Jones in July of 1970) Image 1
  • “Dean Hiner (College of Pharmacy) said his faculty could get along with anybody; however, if it (the site for the new College of Pharmacy building) went to the Medical Center he wanted it understood that his profession was a dignified profession and was not to be browbeaten by the Medics.” (Memo from Martin Brixen in March of 1958)
  • “Since the development of married student housing will cut out about four holes on the golf course, it was decided that detailed plans should be drawn up as quickly as possible in order that it could be explained to the Fort Douglas Club people.” (Minutes of the Planning Committee in August of 1956)
  • Avard Fairbanks first dean of the College of Fine Arts (reacting to the emergence of Modernist ideas on campus): “The corruption of art students’ principles stems from being exposed to foreign art manglers, the subversive doctrine of [-]isms, Communist-inspired and Communist-connected. These influences have one boasted goal: the destruction of our cultural tradition and priceless heritage.” (quoted in Anne Palmer Peterson. Years of Promise: The University of Utah’s A. Ray Olpin Era, 1946-1964. Salt Lake City, Utah: University of Utah Press, 2009.)
  • Orson Spencer Hole (Utah Daily Chronicle, April 17, 1956) Image 2

Photo Gallery

Image 1. Tanner Fountain. Courtesy of University of Utah Archives.

Image 2. From the Utah Daily Chronicle, April 17, 1956. Courtesy of Utah Digital Newspapers.

Image 3. This initial concept for the Merrill Engineering Center included a circular auditorium and six-story classroom building. Courtesy of University of Utah Marriott Library Special Collections.

 

 

Image 4. The original plans for the Union building included a “campanile” or bell tower in the area to the south of the building. Courtesy of University of Utah Archives.

Image 5. An early rendering of Pioneer Memorial Theater as a replica of the Salt Lake Theater. Courtesy of University of Utah Archives.

 

Utah World War I Commission

Veterans of WWI, male and female, stand in front of an airplane, Ogden, Utah, 1919.

World War I veterans in Ogden, 1919. USHS

April 2017 marks the centennial of America’s entry into World War I, a defining conflict of the modern era.

To commemorate the sacrifice and involvement of Utahns in the Great War, the Utah WWI Commission will provide information and resources to the public.

News

The commission is offering small grants to encourage Utahns to recognize the impact of WWI in their communities. Projects could include:

  • Guest lectures
  • Community memorial programs
  • WWI monument cleaning, tracking, or repair
  • Community WWI history

Contact uhq@utah.gov for more information.

Events

Event listings will be updated regularly. If you know of a WWI-related event in Utah, email us at uhq@utah.gov.

Veterans of World War I in a parade in Ogden, Utah, 1919.

Veterans of World War I, Ogden, 1919. USHS

 

August 12
Military Appreciation Day for all state parks

November 10
Utah State University: Musical program by Craig Jessop
University of Utah: Veteran’s Day program

Resources

During World War I, telegraphy was taught at the University of Utah to soldiers from Fort Douglas.

During World War I, telegraphy was taught at the University of Utah to soldiers from Fort Douglas. USHS

Educational resources: Curriculum and more, searchable by grade level, subject, and type

Utah and World War I: special issue of Utah Historical Quarterly

Utah and the Great War: The Beehive State and the World War I Experience, ed. by Allan Kent Powell: a collection of essays exploring the complexity of WWI and its impact on Utahns

Splinters of a Nation: German Prisoners of War in Utah: documentary film about German POWs in Utah and the Salina massacre

State Legislature’s Resolution (PDF)

Governor’s Declaration, April 2017 (PDF)

Utah in the World War, by Noble Warrum: published under the auspices of the Utah Council of Defense in 1924

The Great War, from American Experience

National WWI Museum and Memorial

At our April 6th commemorative event, Dr. Robert Means read two poems about the WWI experience. Follow these links for the text of these poems:

Utah Archaeology Site Form Data Submissions

A spreadsheet containing basic archaeological site information defined by the UTSHPO, will be required for any site form submission using the new Utah Archaeology Site Form (UASF). This requirement includes both new recordings and update/addendum recordings. This spreadsheet contains 21 data points across 37 fields as agreed-upon by the Interagency Task Force in February 2017. These data will be used to populate UTSHPO archaeological site databases.

The UTSHPO template must be strictly followed, including field/column name and field ‘lookup’ values. The lookup values are held within the spreadsheet and are pulled directly from the UASF manual. Deviations from the previously defined and approved values will result in data transfer errors. As such, deviations from field names or lookup values may result in projects being submitted for UTSHPO review being returned or rejected for corrections.

If you find values in the UTSHPO tabular template that you feel are in error please contact the Archaeology Records staff. Any desired changes to the UASF or approved lookup values are handled through the Interagency Task Force Group. If you are interested in a change please contact an agency representative for review.

The Utah Archaeology Site Form template can be found here.

A spreadsheet containing explanations of each field, its data type, acceptable values, and USAF section can be found here.

Utah Archaeology Site Form Release

In February 2017, the Interagency Task Force, which includes leaders from state and federal agencies and UTSHPO, met and approved the official launch of the new archaeological site form for use in Utah. The Utah Archaeological Site Form (UASF) is the result of several years of collaborative work between agencies, academic institutions, and private consultants.  The new form can now be used to provide adequate documentation for archaeological resources in Utah, except for United States Forest Service managed lands.

Digital copies of the new form can be found here:

The associated manual can be found here.

Immediate adoption of the new site form is encouraged as continued use of IMACS will not be allowed after November 1st, 2017. Following this grace period UTSHPO will no longer accept IMACS forms. Existing contracted projects may be allowed to submit IMACS forms after the drop-dead date on a case-by-case basis with UTSHPO.

In addition to the new form, UTSHPO is requiring submission of a  spreadsheet populated with core site data in a standardized format. More information about this spreadsheet can be found here. Any site form generator used will need to populate a properly formatted spreadsheet or the user will manually enter the information into a template spreadsheet provided by the UTSHPO. Further digital standards are pending the release of a new electronic SHPO consultation system that will eliminate paper submission. More information will be forthcoming.

Mesa to Mountain Symposium 2017

For More Information and Conference Registration click here.

Salt Lake City is a crossroads of the American West and abounds with historic resources and projects that will be of interest to APT members from across the country. Mesa to Mountain will explore the rich history and unique preservation challenges of this region with a focus on western sites, materials, and conditions.

The symposium kicks off on Thursday, March 23 with a plenary address and reception at the historic Alta Club. Friday begins with a keynote address, then continues with a full day of paper sessions following three tracks: Seismic Retrofit of Historic Buildings, Materials and Construction Techniques, and Cultural Heritage Management. On Saturday, three full-day tours will take participants to historic sites in the Salt Lake City area.

Utah Historical Quarterly Current Issue


Volume 85, Number 1 (Winter 2017 Issue):


Published since 1928, the Utah Historical Quarterly is the state’s premier history journal and the source for reliable, engaging Utah history. Join the Historical Society for your own copy.

Each issue of the Utah Historical Quarterly is accompanied with rich web supplements that introduce readers to sources, photos, interviews, and other engaging material. These “extras” are located at history.utah.gov/uhqextras.

WEB EXTRAS: See here 


IN THIS ISSUE


The Utah Historical Quarterly first devoted an issue entirely to architectural history in 1975, with “Toward an Architectural Tradition”; just over a decade later came a second such issue, investigating “Architecture at the Turn of the Century.” The time has come to add to this body of work. In this issue of UHQ, we focus on historic preservation and on place-based history of the built environment.

Historic preservation has a variety of meanings, depending on one’s perspective and experience. In the broadest of definitions, it encompasses the movement to document and save that which is meaningful to our collective history. While to some this phrase may convey the stoppage of time, to others it represents change. Places are not frozen; they are always evolving. The historic preservation process gives us a chance to collectively determine if and how historic places work within the context of a changing built environment. You can’t see historic preservation in a museum. While history is physically present around us every day, it’s part of a temporary museum undergoing permanent change.

Preservation embraces a cross-section of community-based practices and institutions that include historic architecture and archaeology, as well as museums, libraries, and archives, festivals, tourism, and long-lived businesses. Though representing even a thread of all these areas in a special issue would be a challenge, the essays in this issue demonstrate the breadth of knowledge of Utah’s architectural historians and archaeologists, highlighting some of the tremendous
research and writing in the field. The authors’ expertise and the UHQ’s support of this type
of research help generate more public understanding or places that matter. This issue demonstrates the important role of historic preservation in Utah in determining how our state changes for the better when we consider places of meaning—what I refer to in my opening essay as sites of conscience.

Bim Oliver served as a consultant in the documentation of the midcentury development of the University of Utah campus. The years after World War II saw extensive growth in student population, though it took the state twenty-five years to catch up to the demand for greater access and new academic programs. The buildings constructed during those years of development and change are now frequently discussed—and targeted—for demolition. One goal of Oliver’s documentation was to foster greater public appreciation for why these places were built in the first place and how they were used. Although they look different than the older structures forming Presidents Circle, Oliver argues, midcentury, Modernist buildings still deserve preservation.

Given the amount of federally owned public lands in Utah, partnerships between the managing federal agencies, interested stakeholders, lessees of federal property, and the public at large are essential in administering the cultural resources on those lands. Richa Wilson, a Forest Service architectural historian, offers an overview of the evolution of Forest Service architecture in Utah dating to the early twentieth century. She shows how buildings constructed in the state’s forests both reflected and departed from mainstream trends. The changing nature of federal
forest management and policies gave each period distinctive design characteristics that continue to be identifiable today.

In his essay, Thomas Carter, an emeritus professor at the University of Utah, argues that historic
preservationists derive cultural meaning through analysis and drawing. Through this series of artistic drawings, Carter highlights a wide range of building types and forms, architectural styles, and influences in construction. His essay also demonstrates the importance of drawing to historic preservation and how that skill is fading with each generation.

Finally, Sheri Murray Ellis, a cultural resource consultant, details the growth and decline of the Ogden Union Stockyard. This large and profitable facility came to exist largely through the instruments of technology—especially the railroad—and, in the end, newer technologies made the yards obsolete. Today, they are the site of redevelopment efforts.

I want to acknowledge my tremendous appreciation to the authors in this issue and to the UHQ editors for their willingness to produce the issue and persistent, professional guidance to oversee its completion.

Kirk Huffaker, Guest Editor
Preservation Utah

 


ARTICLES

 

 

 

Becoming More Conscientious of Utah’s Sites of Conscience
By Kirk Huffaker

Modernism on Campus: Architecture at the University of Utah, 1945–1975
By Bim Oliver

Building the Forest Service in Utah: An Architectural Context
By Richa Wilson

Studying the Unstudied: Utah Drawings from the Western Regional Architecture Program Collection, Marriott Library, University of Utah, 1982–2016
By Thomas Carter

The Last Word in Stockyard Construction: The Rise and Fall of the Ogden Union Stockyard
By Sheri Murray Ellis


BOOK REVIEWS

Leisl Carr Childers, The Size of the Risk: Histories of Multiple Use in the Great Basin. Reviewed by Joseph E. Taylor III

Matthew L. Harris and Newell G. Bringhurst, eds., The Mormon Church and Blacks: A Documentary History. Reviewed by Russell Stevenson

Larry Gerlach, Alma Richards, Olympian. Reviewed by Chris Elzey


BOOK NOTICES

Jonathan Foster, Lake Mead National Recreation Area: A History of America’s First National Playground

Photographs by Peter Goin, Essays by Peter Friederici, A New Form of Beauty: Glen Canyon beyond Climate Change

 

NHPA 50 Year Anniversary

Join the nationwide celebration for the 50th Anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) in 2016. This Act transformed the face of communities throughout the United States and Utah by establishing a framework and incentives to preserve historic buildings, landscapes, and archaeological sites.  Coordinated through Preservation50.org, the nationwide celebration is designed to inform and engage all ages and backgrounds in this significant law’s effects on local communities and history. Since 1966, the NHPA has shaped preservation efforts on America’s history and culture while generating positive social and economic impacts. In 2015, the Utah State Historic Preservation Office (formed in 1973) gathered stakeholders to organize a year of events and to gather engaging stories and media for the celebration.

This website is a portal to a year of events and activities that cover all corners of Utah.

Events Calendar     Media     Preservation Apps     Links     Partners

shipwreckgsl

Shipwreck at the Great Salt Lake

 

Utah Archaeology and Historic Preservation Month celebrates Utah’s rich archaeological and historical resources with a month of lectures and hands-on learning. Statewide events include:

  • Open house at the Natural History Museum of Utah with educational activities for (kids and adults
  • Hands-on experiences
  • Lectures and paper presentations
  • Tours of archaeological and historical sites

Printable version of the events calendar is available!

Please note: Updates occur regularly, but may take up to 48 hours to appear. Please note: Jumps may land slightly below their marker. We are sorry for the inconvenience.

Do you have an event? Please email cmerritt@utah.gov and fill out the Archaeology and Historic Preservation Event Form

 

Golden Spike National Historic Site

  • Transcontinental Celebration (148th Anniversary)
    Date & Time: Wednesday, May 10 (9am to 5pm)
    Location: Golden Spike National Historic Site, 32 miles west of Brigham City
    For More Information (contact info): 435-471-2209, ext 29
    Sponsors/Organizations: National Park Service

    Admission Cost: Free
    Event Description: Golden Spike National Historic Site will celebrate the 148th anniversary of the completion of the nation’s first transcontinental railroad on Wednesday, May 10th, 2017.  Events marking the May 10th occasion include the recreation of the historic “champagne photo”, a performance by Box Elder High School Band, traditional anniversary program, a re-enactment of the original 1869 ceremony, and locomotive steam demonstrations. This year’s keynote speaker will be Jimmy Chen, Professor of Computer Science & Information Systems, and Utah Advisor of Overseas Community Affairs Council, Republic of China (Taiwan). Full calendar of events can be found here: Press Release

 

CacheCounty

Logan

  • Archaeology Day
    Date & Time: Saturday, May 6 (10am to 2pm)
    Location: Museum of Anthropology, Old Main RM 252, Utah State University
    For More Information (contact info): Molly Cannon, molly.cannon@usu.edu
    Sponsors/Organizations:
    USU Museum of Anthropology
    Admission Cost: Free
    Event Description: Join the World Explorers Club at the USU Museum of Anthropology. Come explore the wonders of Archaeology with us! Try out our mini dig site, learn about major discoveries in archaeology, and hear “Tech Talks” every half hour showing off the technology used by archaeologists.

Hyrum

  • Hyrum Hydro-Electric Power Plant Tour
    Date & Time: Wednesday, May 10, 6-8pm
    Location: Blacksmith Fork Canyon
    For More Information (contact info): Jami J. Van Huss, museum@hyrumcity.com, 435-245-0208
    Sponsors/Organizations:
    Hyrum Museum
    Admission Cost: Free
    Event Description: Visit Hyrum City’s hydro-electric plant in Blacksmith Fork Canyon! Hyrum Power Superintendent Matt Draper will briefly discuss the history of electricity in Hyrum (one of Cache Valley’s first electrified cities) and the work inovlved with keeping the lights on. Come and see how water is turned into electricty.

  • Guided Tours of Historic Hyrum
    Date & Time: Saturday, May 13 (11am to 1pm)
    Location: Meet at Hyrum Museum, 50 West Main
    For More Information (contact info): Jami J. Van Huss, museum@hyrumcity.com, 435-245-0208
    Sponsors/Organizations:
    Hyrum Museum
    Admission Cost: Free
    Event Description: Guided tours of historic Hyrum will begin at 11:00 am and 1:00 pm. Meet at the museum fifteen minutes prior to your tour time. Since there is limited seating on the bus, please sign-up ahead of time at the museum. Tours will last 35–45 minutes and will be based off the Historic Tour of Hyrum, Utah booklet, which will be provided to all participants. Additional booklets will be available at the museum for those interested in driving themselves. More tour times may be added if needed.

 

Board of State History

Meeting Agenda

Thursday, January 19, 2017, 12:00 – 3:00 pm

Rio Grande Depot, Board Room, 300 South Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City, UT

TIME:  Noon – working lunch for Board members, hosted by State History

12:15 p.m. – WELCOME – Dina Blaes, Chair

October – December State History program accomplishments

Brad Westwood (5 min)
1. Strategic Plan to the Utah Museum of History, Heritage and Arts – Timeline & Essential Steps
2. Utah Drawn:  An Exhibition of Rare Maps.  Displayed at the Utah Capitol, 4th Floor, opens January 27, 2017

Roger Roper – Historic Preservation (5 min)
1. Community preservation: continued coordination with other cultural/heritage agencies and organizations to better coordinate the delivery of services to communities.
2. Grant Management transition (with Debbie’s retirement, creation of online database, etc.)
3. Utah Heritage Traditions: moving forward with getting several documented for designation in the fall.

Wendy Rex-Atzet – History Day (5 min)
1. History Day on the Hill – report
2. Spring Contests – invite board members and help us solicit judges

Doug Misner – Library and Collections (5 min)
1. Improving ability to manage and care for the collection
2. Update on the selection of a new collection management system (CMS).

Improving public access to the collection
1. Update on the implementation of our new public access catalog.
2. New digital asset management system implemented by University of Utah.
3. Hired part time Reference Librarian.

Outreach and partnerships
1. Participated in Watch & Talk lecture series hosted by the Division of Arts and Museums.
2. Created an artifact display for the renaming ceremony at the Central Utah Veterans Home in Payson.

Arie Leeflang – Antiquities (5 min)
1. Veteran’s Memorial Database & Story Map.
2. Over 15,000 records have been data-entered for the BLM, to improve their management of archaeological resources.
3.  GIS
4.  Geo Cortex

Jed Rogers, Holly George – Utah Historical Quarterly (5 min)
1. New UHQ publishing and marketing initiative.
2. Contents of the winter UHQ issue.
3. World War I Commission.

Kevin Fayles – Communications (5 min)
1. Webstats and social media.
2. Burial records.
3. Emergency management planning (FEMA PA, Annex, etc,)

ACTION ITEMS 

  1. Approval of the October 27, 2016 Board of State History Retreat minutes – Dina Blaes
    (Board motion required) (3 min)
  2. National Register of Historic Places Nominations – Cory Jensen (25 min)
    (Board motion required)
    Summaries of National Register of Historic Places Nominations
    a) The Ballard-Sego Coal Mine Historic District in Grand County, Utah
    b) The River Heights Sinclair Station
  3. Request for removal from National Register – Cory Jensen (5 min)
    (No Board motion required)
    a) Verd’s Fruit Market Complex in Orem (demolished)
  4. Administrative Rules due for Five Year Review with Dept. of Administrative Rules – Alycia Aldrich
    (Board motion required) (10 min)
    a) R455-1, Adjudicative Proceedings
    b) R455-12, Computerized Record of Cemeteries, Burial Locations and Plots, and Granting Matching Funds

DISCUSSION ITEMS

  1. Committee reports – David Rich Lewis, David Richardson, Steve Olsen, Michael Homer (20 min)
  2. Proposed Museum for History, Heritage and Arts update – Dina Blaes, Brad Westwood (15 min)
  3. Legislative briefing
    a) 250th Anniversary Year of the Nation – Brad Westwood (5 min)
    b) Historic Districts, Tax Credits – Roger Roper (5 min)
    c) WWI funding proposal – Kevin Fayles (5 min)
  4. Budget briefing from the Department of Heritage and Arts – Tenielle Young, Jim Grover (15 min)
  5. 2017 outreach and events to include Board members – Kevin Fayles (5 min)OTHER BUSINESS

Annual Disclosure Forms (2 min)
Board Photo (5 minutes)

NEXT MEETING:  April 20, 2017, 12:00 pm – 3:00 pm

ADJOURN