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Category Archives: Archaeology Records

Utah Archaeology Site Form Data Submissions

A spreadsheet containing basic archaeological site information defined by the UTSHPO, will be required for any site form submission using the new Utah Archaeology Site Form (UASF). This requirement includes both new recordings and update/addendum recordings. This spreadsheet contains 21 data points across 37 fields as agreed-upon by the Interagency Task Force in February 2017. These data will be used to populate UTSHPO archaeological site databases.

The UTSHPO template must be strictly followed, including field/column name and field ‘lookup’ values. The lookup values are held within the spreadsheet and are pulled directly from the UASF manual. Deviations from the previously defined and approved values will result in data transfer errors. As such, deviations from field names or lookup values may result in projects being submitted for UTSHPO review being returned or rejected for corrections.

If you find values in the UTSHPO tabular template that you feel are in error please contact the Archaeology Records staff. Any desired changes to the UASF or approved lookup values are handled through the Interagency Task Force Group. If you are interested in a change please contact an agency representative for review.

The required UASF Tabular Data Submission template can be found here.

A spreadsheet containing explanations of each field, its data type, acceptable values, and USAF section can be found here.

Utah Archaeology Site Form Release

In February 2017, the Interagency Task Force, which includes leaders from state and federal agencies and UTSHPO, met and approved the official launch of the new archaeological site form for use in Utah. The Utah Archaeological Site Form (UASF) is the result of several years of collaborative work between agencies, academic institutions, and private consultants.  The new form can now be used to provide adequate documentation for archaeological resources in Utah, except for United States Forest Service managed lands.

Digital copies of the new form can be found here:

The associated manual can be found here.

Immediate adoption of the new site form is encouraged as continued use of IMACS will not be allowed after November 1st, 2017. Following this grace period UTSHPO will no longer accept IMACS forms. Existing contracted projects may be allowed to submit IMACS forms after the drop-dead date on a case-by-case basis with UTSHPO.

In addition to the new form, UTSHPO is requiring submission of a  spreadsheet populated with core site data in a standardized format. More information about this spreadsheet can be found here. Any site form generator used will need to populate a properly formatted spreadsheet or the user will manually enter the information into a template spreadsheet provided by the UTSHPO. Further digital standards are pending the release of a new electronic SHPO consultation system that will eliminate paper submission. More information will be forthcoming.

Digital Encoding Forms

Digital Archaeology Records Submissions
12/7/2015

In the interim period leading up to the rollout of a statewide new archaeological site recording system the Utah SHPO is offering an additional avenue to submit IMACS encoded data.  This will negate the need for a paper encoding form submission.  Until the new site recording system is fully adopted Utah SHPO will continue to require IMACS encoded data be submitted as part of all SHPO submission packets.  For this interim period, we welcome the digital submission of this encoded data in our defined .csv (or .xls) format.  Please download the .csv file and instructional spreadsheet.  Fieldnames should not be changed.   One example record is included in the .csv file – please delete this record prior to future population.

Population of this .csv file follows the existing encoded data specifications with data entered into a spreadsheet row instead of a paper form.  We feel this process should be straightforward.  Please direct any questions to archrecords@utah.gov.

The resulting file will be submitted on portable media (CD or DVD likely) and delivered as part of your SHPO submission packet.  Preferable this media will also include pertinent shapefiles and PDFs of the report and site form following the proposed 2012 BLM Digital Data Standards.

Preservation Pro Update: October 22, 2013

Utah Division of State History
Preservation Pro Update
October 22nd, 2013

This memo is intended to update Preservation Pro users and our agency partners on what the archaeology records staff has been working on and completed during the recent months.

General Stats:

  • Archaeological report spatial data uploaded August-September 2013: 310
  • Archaeological site spatial data uploaded August-September: 464
  • Site forms scanned in August-September: 1800 (focused on Uintah County).

Site Form Access Bug

We’ve received numerous reports concerning issues accessing site forms scans- thank you for the feedback.  Our IT staff is reportedly exploring the issue and searching for a solution.  In the interim, if you are needing one or two site forms from counties already scanned (BE, BO, CA, DA, DC, DV, GR, IN, UN) please contact archrecords and we’ll see what we can do.  We encourage anyone experiencing the issue to “report a bug” via the feedback tab to escalate the issue.

Site form scanning update:

We are currently working on scanning Uintah County.  This county was chosen due to the high traffic these records are receiving.  We are over 50% complete with that county.  Our Department recently purchased a high volume scanner to expedite the project.  We currently have nine counties (BE, BO, CA, CB, DA, DC, DV, GR, and IN) scanned.

Additional Preservation Pro development update: 

Last month we were finally able to get a ‘landownership’ identifier added to the system.  We hope it’s been of use.  If you have other functionality you’d like to see added please use the “report request feature” in the feedback tab.

Preservation Pro and the Proposed “New IMACS”

We are currently preparing for the potential rollout of new site recording standards and forms in Utah.  Given the large changes to the form, and our software and financial constraints, we’ll be significantly modifying the data we retain in Preservation Pro.  Our focus will be on providing digital site forms (pdf) and basic tabular data on every submitted site.  In working with key agencies we feel this will add more value to the system.  More information is coming- but if you have questions please feel free to contact us.

New Records Email Address:

For those of you who haven’t heard, we’ve recently launched a new email address for records needs:  archrecords@utah.gov.  This is a group email address that we hope will provide quicker and better service for records needs.  Please update your email address book.

Send us your shapefiles!

Thank you to all who have generously responded to our requests for spatial data.  We continue to accept digital spatial data as an addition to your usual paper-based submission packet.  A CD or other portable media attached to the report is best (addressed to us), but we can be flexible on other the delivery methods.  We know such submissions were discouraged in the past, but change is here!


Preservation Pro FAQ

Preservation Pro provides online access to historic buildings records and certain archaeology records managed by the Utah Division of State History.  Information below concerns only the archaeological data.  If you have questions concerning historic buildings data please email Preservation Pro admin.

Due to the protected nature of the archaeology records access through Preservation Pro, a State of Utah Archaeological Permit administered by PLPCO is required for access.  A subscription fee, to help cover hosting and maintenance costs, is required annually.  Preservation Pro is a work in progress and currently provides access to basic data concerning archaeological sites and related archaeological projects in Utah

There are several components to Preservation Pro data.  First is geospatial data, which is viewable only.  For over two decades Records Staff has been collecting and updating geospatial data concerning archaeological sites and related archaeological projects.  We do not provide the ability to download geospatial data.  Preservation Pro allows users to view and generate a list of archaeological sites and projects directly in their project area.

Second, Preservation Pro provides access to basic tabular data concerning archaeological sites.  This tabular data is the result of several decades of IMACS encoded data submitted by archaeologists.  We acknowledge much of the tabular data collected has minimal cultural resource management use and are exploring new solutions to collect more pertinent data.

In addition to site tabular data we are in the process of scanning our archaeological site records.   In April 2013 we finalized a project allowing access to currently scanned site forms from Preservation Pro.  Only certain counties have been scanned.  Please inquire at archrecords@utah.gov for more information.

Finally, Records collects basic bibliographic information concerning archaeological project reports.  Starting in 2012 full titles and authors are being collected in addition to the basic project data (e.g. survey acreage; project name, etc.) previously collected for reported received over the past two decades.

If you have further questions please review our FAQ below.  If your question is not answered please contact staff at archrecords@utah.gov.

Frequently Asked Questions:

Q:  Can the public access archaeological data in Preservation Pro?

A:  No.  Archaeological data contained in Preservation Pro is restricted to permitted archaeologists.  Access to non-restricted data can be found here: http://historicbuildings.utah.gov/


Q:  I’m an archaeologist permitted by PLPCO- how to I gain access to Preservation Pro?

A:  Access is a two step process.  First, contact records staff (archrecords@utah.gov) for a user application.  You’ll need to provide your PLPCO permit number.  Complete the application and return to staff for review.  Second, once approved you’ll need to pay the fee.  Once approval and payment are made, staff will setup your account.


Q:  Is there a fee for Preservation Pro?

A:  Yes.  There is a fee which helps cover site maintenance costs associated with the application.  The fee is collected by our parent agency, Department of Heritage and Arts, and runs on the State fiscal year (July 1- June 30th).  Unfortunately we are unable to prorate.  For fee schedule information please contact staff.


Q:  Can I download GIS data from Preservation Pro?

A:  No.  Due to interpretation of State law and internal policy we are unable to allow downloading of GIS data to Preservation Pro users.  Spatial data is viewable only.


Q:  Can I complete a full archaeological literature search via Preservation Pro?

A:  The Antiquities Section does not have requirements on what constitutes a complete file search.  Please check with your landowner or contract-holder concerning such requirements.  Preservation Pro can be a significant component of your literature search.  But it’s full applicability will depend on your search location, availability of scans, and your landowner’s requirements.


Q:  Can I share Preservation Pro passwords?

A:  No.  Password sharing is strictly forbidden and can result in termination of your account.


 

 

Paper Record Submissions FAQ: Archaeological Site Forms

Many questions often arise concerning archaeological records and the proper format for submission to the Utah Division of State History, State of Utah Historic Preservation Office.  Answers to some of the more frequent questions and issues can be found below.

Most of these items are recommendations or professional courtesies and not a requirement unless otherwise stated. If your question is not covered below please contact a Records staff member at archrecords@utah.gov. Many standards have been purposefully left in the hands of the land managing agency or at the discretion of the field archaeologist. If you find a conflicting standard or recommendation please contact us.

  • Please staple site forms together including photos. Photos detached from their site form are unacceptable. Please avoid paper clipping the record together as elements often get lost.
  • Site forms should not be bound as part of the report. Site forms should be included separately and be stapled.
  • Site forms should be typed and professionally formatted.  Handwritten forms are unacceptable.
  • IMACS Encoding forms are currently required. Encoding forms can be either paper clipped to the site form, or stapled to either the front or back of the site form.  Please do not include the encoding form in the middle of the site form. Additionally, if submitting double-sided site forms, leave the encoding form single sided, and again, at the front or back of the form. If you’d like to submit encoded data electronically please see contact a staff member.
  • Encoding forms for updated or revisited site forms are required. Only the updated fields need to be completed.
  • Printing your reports and site forms double-sided is acceptable and helps save space and trees. But, please do not include the encoding form as part of the double-siding (see above).
  • Concerning the Smithsonian trinomial, we do not require a six-digit expression of the numeric component. We prefer no extra zeros be added. For example 42KA111 is the preferred composition versus 42KA000111.
  • Concerning the Smithsonian trinomial, we have no requirement on the capitalization of the two letter county abbreviation.
  • Please be sure all figures, especially maps, are clearly legible in your final print out. These figures are often used to relocate resources and/or digitize from- please provide these figures with this in mind.
  • We discourage unjustified lumping or splitting of sites. If you are splitting a previously recorded site into smaller sites or combining previously recorded sites into one larger site please contact us for guidance. At a minimum simple one-page site forms for each impacted site will need to be produced justifying the change and informing future researchers of the updated condition.
  • Previously recorded site records obtained during a project’s literature search should not be included in the submission packet- unless you are confident State History does not have a copy and are providing it as such.
  • For standards concerning photographs in site forms please reference our page on photos.
  • It is appreciated, but not yet required, that photographs be additionally provided on printed on standard sheets of paper.  This allows for easy sheet feeding through a copier or scanner.
  • Since an archaeological site excavation project permanently alters the site, an update to the site’s IMACS form is required as part of the final report.
  • Site forms should always include a map, based on a USGS 24k quadrangle, that clearly shows the site location.
  • If the site form is an update or addendum of a previously recorded site, it should be clearly noted next to the site number.
  • Sites that straddle county boundaries require two number- one for each county.  One site recording should be generated, but two copies of the site form should be provided.
  • A paper copy of your report and associated site form is required.  In addition to the paper record, we encourage you provide a digital copy of your records submission as well.  Information concerning these additional submissions will be updated soon.

All site recording and reporting should be completed in consultation and compliance with relevant landowner standards and practices.  Where such standards do not match those listed above please contact us. See additional FAQs here.

Paper Record Submissions FAQ: Archaeological Reports

Many questions often arise concerning archaeological records and the proper format for submission to the Utah Division of State History, State of Utah Historic Preservation Office.  Answers to some of the more frequent questions and issues can be found below. For information concerning state project number assignment please reference guideline here.

Most of these items are recommendations or professional courtesies and not a requirement unless otherwise stated. If your question is not covered below please contact the Records staff at archrecords@utah.gov. Many standards have been purposefully left in the hands of the land managing agency or at the discretion of the field archaeologist. If you find a conflicting standard or recommendation please email us.

  • Please staple your project cover sheet to your report.  The cover sheet is a permanent archived addition to your report.   A blank .pdf can be found here.
  • Please do not include multiple title pages to your report.  Multiple title pages, especially when printed on card stock, look great, but take up room and jam the copier.
  • Printing your reports and site forms double sided is acceptable and helps save space and trees.
  • Reports smaller than 1cm should not be bound.  Please either secure with a binder clip or staple.  Previously bound reports have an increased tendency to tear or jam the copier.
  • Please be sure all figures, especially maps, are clearly legible in your final print out.  These figures are often used to relocate resources and/or digitize from- please provide these figures with this in mind.  Please see our cartographic best practices here (link).
  • Three-hole punching your reports is not required.  We’ve recently abandoned our three-ring binder filing system in favor of archival boxes.
  • Since an archaeological site excavation project permanently alters the site, an update to the site’s IMACS form is required as part of the final report.
  • Archaeological excavation reports do require a State Project Number.
  • Archaeological monitoring reports only require a State Project Number when a discovery is made.  Exceptions can be made.
  • A paper copy of your report and associated site form is required.  In addition to the paper record, we encourage you provide a digital copy of your records submission as well.  Information concerning these additional submissions can be found here (link).

All site recording and reporting should be completed in consultation and compliance with relevant landowner standards and practices.  Where such standards do not match those listed above please contact us. See additional FAQs here.

About Archaeology Records

The Antiquities Section at the Utah Division of State History is the primary repository for archaeological records for the State of Utah. We are mandated (State Code 9-8-304) to “collect and administer site survey and excavation records.” Archaeological site records managed by the Antiquities Section are protected under GRAMA and other federal laws and access is restricted to State permitted archaeologists.

The vast majority of our records are received via the SHPO consultative process. This process was established in the early 1980’s with earlier records conglomerated from a variety of sources including the University of Utah and land managing agencies. Most other land managing agencies in Utah also maintain archaeological records that pertain to their land. While we strive for a complete collection, we always recommend checking with the landowner for records that haven’t been submitted or are missing from our collection.

Our collection includes archaeological site forms and related archaeological reports. We only retain survey (Class II and III), excavation, and certain monitoring reports. Class I literature searches are not retained. We also have a significant digital dataset with associated archaeological tabular data, some scanned site forms, and a large GIS dataset. Due to the sensitive nature of our records, we are unable to share GIS data. Instead, we offer online access to view the dataset to State permitted archaeologists only. Our onsite paper records have the same access requirements and are available by appointment only.

If you are a State permitted archaeologist and require access please contact a staff member at archrecords@utah.gov. If you are an archaeologist and do not have a permit, you can apply here.  If you are not an archaeologist we recommend you contact the landowner concerning the resources you are interested in.