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Historic Preservation – National Register

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Salt Palace

The National Register recognizes places that matter to Americans.

The National Register of Historic Places is the official federal list of properties that are significant in American history, architecture, archaeology, or engineering.

Places may be listed individually, as part of an Historic District, or as part of a multiple property or statewide thematic category.

Utah’s historic properties are frequently added to the National Register of Historic Places. Recent nominations to the National Register that are currently under review include:

To see historic properties in Utah that were recently approved for the National Register, click here.

To search all historic properties in Utah, click here.

 

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National Register Nominations | September 2014

In October 2014, the Board of State History, for the Utah Division of State History, will review five (5) nominations to the National Register. These nominations are:

John & Margaret Price House in Salt Lake City


Murray City Diesel Power Plant in Murray


Rawsel & Jane Bradford House in Murray


James & Mary Jane Miller House in Murray


John & Sarah Jane Wayman House in Centerville


The Board of State History meets on October 17, 2014. These meetings are public. To view or print the meeting agenda, please visit the Board of State History on this web site. Please note: agenda for October 2014 may be delayed due to the production of the sixty-second annual Utah State History conference.

Utah’s Latest Additions to the National Register

Check out the latest historic properties in Utah listed on the National Register of Historic Places: The Coal Bed Village Site, San Juan County; Ron’s Phillips 66 Service State, Centerville: The Great Hunt Panel, Carbon County; Oregon Short Line RR Station, Layton; Salt Lake SE and NW Base Monuments, Davis County; Robert Gardner, Jr., House, Millcreek; and the Thomas & Elizabeth Coddington House, James & Emily Herbert House, Robert & Mary Ann Singleton House, and the Thomas & Eliza Jane Singleton House, all in American Fork.


Coal Bed Village Site
San Juan County

Statement of Significance: Coal Bed Village Site is one of the most unique Ancestral Puebloan archaeological sites anywhere in the United States because of its size, architectural patterns, and wealth of
archaeological data potential. Possibly ranging from the Basketmaker III period, and ending at or soon after the Pueblo III period, the site was likely occupied for over 500 years between A.D. 700 and A.D. 1300. This site is also likely an early Chacoan outlier of the San Juan Region similar to the National Register-listed Carhart Pueblo (NRIS #15000401). This site illustrates the cultural development of the Ancestral Puebloan peoples in the Montezuma Canyon and San Juan region, with clear expressions of community planning, development, and succession. Coal Bed Village is connected to a broader regional pattern of prehistoric settlement and growth throughout the American Southwest and is associated with the spread of Ancestral Puebloan cultural traditions into modern-day Utah. Thus, the site is eligible for the National Register of Historic Places at a national level and has a period of significance between A.D. 700 and A.D. 1300. Because of its clear association with the broad patterns of human occupation and settlement of San Juan County and the growth of Ancestral Puebloan populations, the site is eligible under Criterion A for the area of Ethnic Heritage, Community Planning and Development, and Religion. Criterion Consideration A also applies because of the use of the site for religious purposes. However, as noted, the site is also significant in areas other than religion. Given the complexity of long-term temporal range of the occupations, the site is an excellent resource for understanding the development of communities in the PI through PIII era, under the Community Planning and Development area of Criteria C. Finally, under Criterion D the site is significant under the area of Prehistoric Archeology and Religion and has the potential to provide information important for our understanding of national, regional, and local adaptions to community establishment, architectural construction techniques, subsistence, economics, religion, and settlement patterning during the most significant 400 years of San Juan County’s prehistoric past. Further, the site has a significant amount of intact subsurface deposits and physically extensive middens that will yield important data for understanding high, medium, and low order research questions for many years.

Read the full nomination:
Coal Bed Village Site


Ron’s Phillips 66 Service Station
Centerville, Davis County

Statement of Significance: Ron’s Phillips 66 Service Station, built in 1960, is locally significant under Criterion C as an early and architecturally significant example of the Phillips Petroleum Company’s “New Look” service station designs in the 1960s.  It is also significant as the only example of a modern style service station that retains historic integrity in Centerville. Ron’s Service Station is significant in the area of Architecture for its association with the distinctive designs produced by the Phillips 66 Company in the 1960s.  Construction on the building was completed just a few months after a wind storm destroyed the Randalls’ first Phillips 66 station at the same location.  The Phillips Petroleum Company provided the design for the new service station, the prototype for Phillips 66’s “New Look” based on designs produced by the company’s architect, Clarence Reinhardt.  All of Reinhardt’s variations included an upwardly canted triangular canopy, a design influenced by the fins found on automobiles and rockets of the time period.  Ron’s Service Station, built in the spring of 1960, appears to have been one of the earliest examples.  Although the Phillips 66 Company built over 3,000 similar service stations in the 1960s, Ron’s Service Station in Centerville is distinguished by its rare footprint, historic integrity, continuous usage, and the extant original pumps.  The period of significance spans the original construction in 1960 to 1967, the current cut-off date for National Register eligibility.  Ron’s Phillips 66 Service Station is a distinctive landmark building on Centerville’s Main Street and represents the contributions of the Randall family to the community of Centerville.

Read the full nomination:
Ron’s Phillips 66 Service Station


The Great Hunt Panel
Nine Mile Canyon, Carbon County

Statement of Significance: The Great Hunt Panel Site (42Cb239) is a nationally significant representation of prehistoric rock art, located in Nine Mile Canyon. One of the five panels, the Great Hunt Panel, has been used in publications across the globe and is a nationally-recognizable prehistoric artistic expression of prehistoric life. The site is eligible under Criteria A, C, and D as established under the “West Tavaputs Adaptation” and “Rock Art” contexts under the “Historic and Prehistoric Resources of Nine Mile Canyon” Multiple Property Submission.. Under Criteria Consideration A, the site was likely used for religious purposes by Native peoples in the past; however, it is significant in other areas as well.  Criteria A is applicable in the areas of Religion and Ethnic Heritage-Native American, as the site displays religious behavior and hunting behavior for our understanding of “Food Procurement” in the Nine Mile Canyon (Spangler 2009: E-20). The site is also significant in the area of Social History for its representation of “Social Structure” (Spangler 2009:E25-E26), and overall community use of the Canyon. Under Criteria C in the area of Art, the rock art panels, specifically the Great Hunt Panel demonstrate the work of a master through excellent use of decorative and graphical elements and their overall composition. The art is also indicative of a period and style, dating to the Archaic and Fremont periods. The Fremont Complex refers to a Formative-period human culture that were both farmers and foragers who heavily depended on maize agriculture as represented in their rock art, and also hunters of bighorn sheep, deer, elk, bison, and antelope (which are represented in their rock art). Finally, Reagan’s 1931 excavations, coupled with further research potential from analyzing the rock art itself, the site has yielded and will still yield significant information regarding prehistory of Nine Mile Canyon and beyond under Criteria D. Innovative research into the style, composition, location, and socio-cultural meaning of prehistoric rock art is a robust academic field, and this site has high integrity to convey important information of past lifeways, local landscape use, and a cosmological understanding of past and contemporary Native peoples.  Artistic motifs range from the Archaic through the Fremont-period, thus the period of significance is 8000 BP to 700 BP. There are no significant historic inscriptions at these panels, thus the period of significance ends at the end of the Fremont period.

Read the full nomination:
Great Hunt Panel


Oregon Short Line RR Station
Layton, Davis County

Statement of Significance: The Oregon Short Line Railroad Station in Layton, Utah, is significant as one of only a handful of surviving historic stations and depots built by the Oregon Short Line Railroad in Utah in the early part of the twentieth century.  The building is locally significant as the only surviving example of railroad architecture in the city of Layton.  The dual-purpose passenger depot and freight house is eligible under Criterion A in the areas of Transportation and Commerce for its association with the history of the Oregon Short Line Railroad and its relationship to Layton’s historic business district. The period of significance spans sixty years, from the initial construction in 1912 to 1965, when the Oregon Short Line ceased operations in Layton.  The Layton station was built by John H. Marshall of Salt Lake City.  The property is eligible under Criterion Consideration B for moved properties. Although the building was moved in 1972, the station is still oriented to the same historic rail corridor only 1500 feet further south.  The new setting is adjacent to a commuter rail platform in Layton’s business district giving it the same general environment as the original location. Furthermore, the Layton station is the only surviving example in Davis County of a frame station house built from standardized plans provided to local contractors by the Oregon Short Line Railroad.  The Layton Oregon Short Line Railroad Station contributes to the history of Layton’s Main Street business district.

Read the full nomination:
Layton OSL RR Station


Salt Lake SE and NW Base Monuments
Layton & West Point, Davis County

Statement of Significance: The Salt Lake South East Base and North West Base Monuments were built in 1896 by William Eimbeck, Assistant, U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. The two discontiguous monuments are locally significant under Criterion A because they embody several important Areas of Significance in the history of the United States. Areas of Significance include Exploration/Settlement, Invention, and Science. Eimbeck was inventing new instrumentation, testing new engineering methods, testing scientific theories, and discovering new science with his observations.  All the while he and his men were exploring areas that were only known to a few individuals. The period of significance for the two monuments is 1896—the year they were constructed and implemented in the testing.

In the area of Exploration/Settlement the Salt Lake South East and North West Base Monuments are part of and represent the undertaking and completion of a larger effort to map the United States along the 39th parallel. Between 1879 and 1895 the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey conducted measurements between the Washington D.C. and San Francisco areas.  The monuments demark the Salt Lake Base Line which was used to anchor the Nevada Net both vertically and horizontally (elevation, latitude and longitude) for the purposes of distance for coast to coast, elevation and location of locations and physical features. The information collected was important in providing exact locational information making possible the connection of place to place. This survey assigned latitude/ longitude designations to physical locations for the first time. He also recorded magnetic measurements and curvature of the earth, neither of which had been widely completed before.

In the area of Invention, the monuments are significant for their part in Eimbeck’s invention and successful testing of the Duplex Base Apparatus (Bars no. 15 and 16), a new instrument at this location using the Salt Lake South East and North West Base Monuments. This instrument helped shoot straight lines necessary for mapping exact coordinates and determining elevation of the locations on the Nevada Net.  His invention was also important because it was more accurate and time efficient.

In the area of Science, the invention and successful testing of the Duplex Base Apparatus contributed to the development of technology and the understanding of metal conductivity which improved the field of survey engineering. Eimbeck’s overall survey and recordation helped delineate the exact location of magnetic north and the curvature of the earth (its size).

Read the full nomination:
Salt Lake Base Monuments


Robert Gardner, Jr., House
Millcreek, Salt Lake County

Statement of Significance: The Robert Gardner, Jr. House, constructed in 1848, in Millcreek, Utah has statewide significance under Criterion D in the area of non-aboriginal historic archaeology for its potential ability to provide archaeological evidence of both its unique construction and the cultural history of its occupants. The Robert Gardner, Jr. House, although its integrity has been compromised, is architecturally and historically significant as the earliest remaining example of the hall-parlor house type, earliest extant example of adobe residential construction, and one of the earliest extant buildings in the State of Utah. The Utah Statewide Historic Preservation Plan has identified adobe houses as an important unique cultural resource in the state. The original property is the location of the first working saw mill and second grist mill constructed shortly after the Mormon pioneers arrived in Utah. Archaeological examination of the original adobe construction and the circa 1850 room addition has a high potential to further our knowledge in the understudied area of historic archaeology and the origins and implementation of adobe construction, first adopted by the LDS pioneers upon their arrival in Utah. In addition, archaeological study of the building structure also has the potential to identify architectural adaptations made to accommodate the practice of polygamy. Finally, archaeological study of the surrounding property, a portion of the original homestead, has a high potential for intact subsurface archaeological deposits associated with the Gardner family and has the unique ability to further our information and understanding of several themes in Utah’s under-explored field of historical archaeology.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saint pioneer settlers arrived in Utah in the fall of 1847 and camped in a temporary fort in Salt Lake City for the winter. Robert and his brother Archibald Gardner were among the first settlers allowed to move out in the early spring of 1848, expressly directed by church leaders to develop a sawmill in the Salt Lake Valley to facilitate building construction in Salt Lake City. The Gardner families chose Mill Creek, immediately built the first saw mill in the Salt Lake Valley, established a farm, and constructed adobe rather than timber houses by the express direction of the Great Salt Lake Municipal High Council. In 1849, the Gardner brothers constructed a more substantial grist mill on the site, which was the second built in Utah.

The Robert Gardner, Jr. House retains integrity of location, setting, design, materials, workmanship, and association; only its façade has been compromised. The period of significance—1848 through 1871—was determined based on the duration of active mill operations directly associated with the house.

Read the full nomination:
Robert Gardner Jr House


Thomas & Elizabeth Coddington House
American Fork, Utah County

Statement of Significance: The Thomas and Elizabeth Coddington House, constructed in 1898 in American Fork, Utah County, Utah has local significance under Criteria A and C. The Thomas and Elizabeth Coddington House is significant under Criterion C for its elaborate Victorian Eclectic architecture, exterior decoration and also as an early and unusual example of a T-shaped cross-wing with a third parallel gable. The inclusion of a third gabled-roof element in T- or L-shaped cross-wing houses is very unusual in early Utah architecture, but there are several examples found among remaining American Fork cross-wing residences constructed in the two decades surrounding 1900. The Thomas and Elizabeth Coddington House is also significant under Criterion A for its association with the agricultural and social history of American Fork, Utah especially during the “Post-Railroad Growth, Maturation of Municipal Institutions, 1880-1911” category of the Historic and Architectural Resources of American Fork, Utah, Multiple Property Submission. A sheep rancher, Thomas Coddington exemplified the successful development of agriculture in American Fork from its founding in 1850 until World War I, culminating around the turn of the Twentieth Century in a prosperous and successful town. He was also involved in local government, with a term as American Fork Mayor, and as a Director of the Bank of American Fork. The house, constructed in 1898, is a representative example of the home of a successful rancher and civic leader in American Fork during this period of agricultural expansion. Thomas Coddington purchased this parcel from its original title holder, George and Eliza Robinson on October 17, 1898 when he and his wife Elizabeth constructed the house. The period of significance spans from when Thomas Coddington built and resided in the house from its completion in 1898 until his sudden death on April 24, 1931. The Thomas and Elizabeth Coddington house retains its architectural integrity and is a contributing historic resource in American Fork..

Read the full nomination:
Coddington Thomas and Elizabeth House


James & Emily Herbert House
American Fork, Utah County

Statement of Significance: The James and Emily Herbert House, constructed in 1899 in American Fork, Utah County, Utah has local significance under Criterion C. The James and Emily Herbert House is significant under Criterion C in the area of Architecture as the only identified example of Victorian Romanesque Revival residential architecture in American Fork and as a late and unusual example of an L-shaped cross-wing with a third smaller parallel side gable in front of the side wing. The inclusion of a third gabled-roof element in T- or L-shaped cross-wing houses is very unusual in early Utah architecture, but there are several examples found among remaining American Fork cross-wing residences constructed in the two decades surrounding 1900. The house is associated the “Post-Railroad Growth, Maturation of Municipal Institutions, 1880-1911” category of the Historic and Architectural Resources of American Fork, Utah, Multiple Property Submission. The Herbert House is a representative example of the residence of a successful businessman and civic leader during this period of successful mining, agriculture and commercial development of American Fork. In 1920, a large bungalow-style porch was added to the main façade, changing the overall appearance and ending the period of significance. Although the porch augments the original Romanesque Revival appearance, it blends well with the existing architecture and is significant in its own right. The James and Emily Herbert House retains food architectural integrity and is a contributing historic resource in American Fork.

Read the full nomination:
Herbert James and Emily House


Robert & Mary Ann Singleton House
American Fork, Utah County

Statement of Significance: The Robert and Mary Ann Singleton House, constructed circa 1897 in American Fork, Utah County, Utah has local significance under Criteria A and C. The Robert and Mary Ann Singleton House is significant under Criterion C for its elaborate Victorian Eclectic architecture, decorative brickwork, and also as an early and unusual example of a T-shaped cross-wing with a third rear-facing parallel gable. The period of significance begins the year of construction, 1897. These complex crosswing houses exhibit more elaborate construction and Victorian decoration than the typical local crosswing house, and were clearly the houses of more affluent citizens. Around the turn of the twentieth century in American Fork, those wealthy citizens were farmers, ranchers and miners. The Robert and Mary Ann Singleton House is also significant under Criterion A for its association with the agricultural history of American Fork, Utah especially during the “Post-Railroad Growth, Maturation of Municipal Institutions, 1880-1911” category of the Historic and Architectural Resources of American Fork, Utah, Multiple Property Submission. Robert Singleton was a wealthy second generation resident of American Fork and a farmer and rancher who owned and farmed 88 acres worth $1,600 in 1900, as well as grazing his livestock in the local canyons. Robert Singleton was a founding member of the Deer Creek Land and Livestock Company, and sat on the board for six years.The Robert and Mary Ann Singleton house retains its architectural integrity and is a contributing resource in American Fork

Read the full nomination:
Singleton Robert and Mary Ann House


Thomas & Eliza Jane Singleton House
American Fork, Utah County

Statement of Significance: The Thomas and Eliza Jane Singleton House, constructed in 1897 in American Fork, Utah County, Utah has local significance under Criteria A and C. The Thomas Singleton House is significant under Criterion C as an architecturally unique example of an unusual double cross-wing and a one-of-a-kind hybrid of the Victorian, Second Empire Mansard and Eastlake styles. The house represents the prosperous second-generation residents of American Fork who built and occupied stately Victorian homes on small farms outside of the American Fork town limits around the turn of the twentieth century. Under Criterion A it is significant for its association with the agricultural history of American Fork, Utah, especially during the “Post-Railroad Growth, Maturation of Municipal Institutions, 1880-1911” category of the Historic and Architectural Resources of American Fork, Utah, Multiple Property Submission. Thomas Singleton farmed 34 acres around American Fork, was one of the largest cattle and sheep raisers in American Fork, and was a horse breeder and trainer who provided work teams for projects throughout the area. As a farmer and rancher, Thomas Singleton exemplified the successful development of agriculture and prosperity that occurred in American Fork from its founding in 1850 until World War I, culminating around the turn of the Twentieth Century in a prosperous and successful town. Thomas and Eliza Jane Singleton were deeded the two-and-a-half acre parcel where the house is located in early 1898 from Hannah Binns Singleton, the second and polygamist wife of John Singleton, who received the official deed to the property in 1874. The Singletons used this property as a farm as early as the 1850s in conjunction with another property southeast of American Fork where she, Thomas and Eliza Jane Singleton resided. The Thomas Singleton family owned and resided in the house at 778 East 50 South from its completion in 1897, the beginning of the period of significance, until Eliza Jane’s death on September 12, 1931, ending the period of significance.The Thomas Singleton house retains its architectural integrity and is a contributing resource in American Fork and Utah County

Read the full nomination:
Singleton Thomas and Eliza Jane House



The National Register of Historic Places is the official federal list of properties that are significant in American history, architecture, archaeology, or engineering.

How can I get a house or building listed? (and other frequently asked questions)

 

National Register Nominations | April 2018

On April 26, 2018, the State Historic Preservation Review Board, for the Utah Division of State History, will review three building nominations, two site nominations under the “Historic Ranching Resources of the Robbers Roost/Under the Ledge areas within Canyonlands National Park and Glen Canyon National Recreation Area” MPS, and 199 site nominations under the “The Rock Art and Archaeology of Moab’s Colorado River System” MPS  for the National Register of Historic Places. These are:

Individual Buildings

UT_Salt Lake County_Ross Hame, Ross Hame, Holladay, Salt Lake County

UT_Wayne County_Morril House, George & Ethalinda Morrill House, Torrey, Wayne County

UT_Salt Lake County_Hobbs House, Edward and Irene Hobbs House, Murray, Salt Lake County

Archaeological Sites

UT_Grand County_RockArtOfMoab_MPS, Rock Art and Archaeology of Moab’s Colorado River System MPS, Moab, Grand County

UT_Garfield County_RobbersRoost-UndertheLedge_MPS, Historic Ranching Resources of the Robbers Roost/Under the Ledge areas within Canyonlands National Park and Glen Canyon National Recreation Area MPS, Garfield & Wayne Counties

UT_Garfield County_RobbersRoost-UndertheLedgeMPS_Chaffin Camp Site, Chaffin Camp Site, Garfield County

UT_Wayne County_RobbersRoost-UndertheLedgeMPS_Cowboy Rock Shelter Site_Redacted, Cowboy Rock Shelter, Wayne County

The State Historic Preservation Review Board will meet on Thursday, April 26, 2018, at 1:00 pm, in the Board Room of the historic Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City, to review the NRHP nominations. These meetings are public. To view or print the meeting agenda, please visit the Board of State History on this web site.

Current National Register Nominations

Utah’s historic properties are frequently added to the National Register of Historic Places. Recent nominations to the National Register that are currently under review include:

To see historic properties in Utah that were recently approved for the National Register, click here.

To search all historic properties in Utah, click here.