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Category Archives: Utah State Historical Society

Documents from the Creation of Cedar Breaks National Monument

On August 22, 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed a proclamation creating a national monument at Cedar Breaks. The following July, residents of Iron County, joined by state and national dignitaries, formally dedicated the monument. The celebration masked nearly two decades of wrangling between the U.S. Forest Service and the National Park Service, as well as between the towns of Parowan and Cedar City, over the proposed monument. Below we reproduce transcribed documents from those years of conflict.

R. E. Gery, September 1923 memorandum

Leon Kneipp, 1932 address

Report by F. A. Waugh, Bryce Canyon and Cedar Breaks, 1923

Leo A. Borah, “Utah, Carved by Winds and Waters,” National Geographic Magazine, May 1936

“Big Time Planned at Cedar Breaks,Parowan Times June 15, 1934

“Plans Maturing For Celebration at Breaks,” Parowan Times June 22, 1934

“Celebrate the Glorious 4th at Cedar Breaks: Plans Complete for Big Formal Opening,Parowan Times, June 29, 1934

“Breaks Monument Dedication Attended by Thousands,” Iron County Record July 5, 1934

“Cedar Breaks Area Fittingly Dedicated,” Parowan Times July 6, 1934

 

UHQ Summer 2017 Web Extras

The University of Utah and the Utes, As Seen in the Utonian

The University of Utah took up the Ute name and imagery in the early twentieth century, just when other professional and collegiate teams did so, and since then its representation has run the gamut from the offensive to the more benign. Here we include a gallery of images the U’s yearbook.

 

 

Rape Law in Mid-Twentieth-Century Utah

Many things–including changing laws and misleading statistics–complicate the study of sexual violence. Still, it is possible to tell that during the 1930s and 1940s, the number of rapes in Utah rose. This occurred at a time when the court system was quite hostile to female victims. Click here for a document related to a case discussed at length in the summer 2017 issue of UHQ.

 

Documents from the Creation of Cedar Breaks National Monument

On August 22, 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed a proclamation creating a national monument at Cedar Breaks. The following July, residents of Iron County, joined by state and national dignitaries, formally dedicated the monument. The celebration masked nearly two decades of wrangling between the U.S. Forest Service and the National Park Service, as well as between the towns of Parowan and Cedar City, over the proposed monument. Follow this link for transcribed documents from those years of conflict.

 

 

The Seventh Census of the United States: Utah and Slavery

The Seventh Census of the United States was scheduled to be counted in 1850. In the provisional state of Deseret, Brigham Young was named the census agent, but before the census could be taken Congress created Utah Territory. Congress appointed Young as the territorial census agent. In addition to the delay that caused, census officials did not receive materials and instructions due to slow mail service.

Finally, April 1, 1851, became the reference date for the Seventh Census in Utah Territory. Assistant agents E. D. Rich, Reuben McBride, Brigham H. Young, and Thomas Bullock began the count using lined papers to record the data because they still hadn’t received official blanks. In July 1851, after the enumeration was completed, Thomas Bullock and Robert Campbell began to recopy the entire census.

On October 31, 1851, a copy was sent to the United States Census Superintendent. This copy—the “official” copy—did not list all the slave inhabitants of Utah on a Schedule 2 for each county. The copy Campbell made of the original enumeration did not show any slaves living in Utah. Known black slaves are listed along with the free white population, giving a false impression that no one was held in bondage in the territory. The only exception is the Schedule 2 for Utah County which shows slaves who were on the way to San Bernardino, California, with their masters. John Bernhisel had advised LDS leaders, who were interested in seeing Utah Territory become a state, to hide the slave population. The official copy of the 1850/1851 census does just that.

The published, official version the 1850 census for Utah that is housed in the National Archives and reproduced on websites is not the “original” version that shows more of the real slave population for the territory. The original version is housed with LDS church records in the Church History Library in Salt Lake as MS 2672.

The different versions of the census have made it very difficult to count and identify slaves held in early Utah. If historians only look at the readily available official census, it gives a skewed picture of who was really in the territory and what their legal status was. Looking at the original version is necessary to get a more accurate count.


IMAGE I-“Official” Schedule 2-Slave Inhabitants in Utah County, Deseret

This image shows the slave schedule submitted to the federal government. It is the published version that shows up on websites which names slaveholders and their slaves who were planning to leave Utah and settle San Bernardino. A few of those listed in that schedule, like Hark Lay and Vilate Crosby, are listed in the Slave Schedule and also among the listings of “Free Inhabitants of Great Salt Lake County” (Schedule 1). The comment “Going to California” written in the remarks column seems to be there to assure federal officials that slaves then in Utah Territory would be leaving.


IMAGE II-Original Schedule 2-Slave Inhabitants-Utah, Salt Lake, and Davis Counties, Utah Territory

This image is the earlier original slave schedule for three counties. It is part of the version of the 1850/51 census that remained in LDS archives. It names some of the black slaves who were not going to California but would continue to live with their masters in Utah. It is, by no means, a complete list of Utah’s slaves, but it does include the African-American Redds. Since there is nothing listed in the column that asked for manumission information for Venus, Chaney, Luke, Marinda, or Amy, it is evidence they were still considered to be the property of the Redd family in 1851. Sam’s status is qualified by the comment that he will be free when he is twenty-one.

Even though Schedule 2 was intended to be an enumeration of slave inhabitants, someone lined out the word “slave” in the title and “colored” has been written in—again, apparently an attempt to disguise the real status of those listed on this schedule.


IMAGE III-“Official” Schedule 1-Free Inhabitants in Utah County, Utah Territory

This page lists the John Hardison Redd family in the “official” census. This is the version found in published census records. The black women and mixed race younger servants appear to be free blacks living in the same household with the white Redds. Their race is notated, but they are listed on the same schedule and in the same way that the Isaac and Jane Manning James family is listed—a free black family.

In the “official” version of the 1850/51 census, some other known slaves are listed on Schedule 1 in the same way as the Redd slaves, with a racial notation indicating they are black. Others who were living in Great Salt Lake and Davis counties are listed in Schedule 1 with no mention of their race. It gives the appearance that they were free white Utahns.

Other than the Redd slaves and Green Flake, none of the slaves listed in the original Schedule 2, reproduced here, are listed anywhere in the official version of the census.

 

Utah Historical Quarterly Winter 2017


Volume 85, Number 1 (Winter 2017 Issue):


Published since 1928, the Utah Historical Quarterly is the state’s premier history journal and the source for reliable, engaging Utah history. Join the Historical Society for your own copy.

Each issue of the Utah Historical Quarterly is accompanied with rich web supplements that introduce readers to sources, photos, interviews, and other engaging material. These “extras” are located at history.utah.gov/uhqextras.

WEB EXTRAS: See here 


IN THIS ISSUE


The Utah Historical Quarterly first devoted an issue entirely to architectural history in 1975, with “Toward an Architectural Tradition”; just over a decade later came a second such issue, investigating “Architecture at the Turn of the Century.” The time has come to add to this body of work. In this issue of UHQ, we focus on historic preservation and on place-based history of the built environment.

Historic preservation has a variety of meanings, depending on one’s perspective and experience. In the broadest of definitions, it encompasses the movement to document and save that which is meaningful to our collective history. While to some this phrase may convey the stoppage of time, to others it represents change. Places are not frozen; they are always evolving. The historic preservation process gives us a chance to collectively determine if and how historic places work within the context of a changing built environment. You can’t see historic preservation in a museum. While history is physically present around us every day, it’s part of a temporary museum undergoing permanent change.

Preservation embraces a cross-section of community-based practices and institutions that include historic architecture and archaeology, as well as museums, libraries, and archives, festivals, tourism, and long-lived businesses. Though representing even a thread of all these areas in a special issue would be a challenge, the essays in this issue demonstrate the breadth of knowledge of Utah’s architectural historians and archaeologists, highlighting some of the tremendous
research and writing in the field. The authors’ expertise and the UHQ’s support of this type
of research help generate more public understanding or places that matter. This issue demonstrates the important role of historic preservation in Utah in determining how our state changes for the better when we consider places of meaning—what I refer to in my opening essay as sites of conscience.

Bim Oliver served as a consultant in the documentation of the midcentury development of the University of Utah campus. The years after World War II saw extensive growth in student population, though it took the state twenty-five years to catch up to the demand for greater access and new academic programs. The buildings constructed during those years of development and change are now frequently discussed—and targeted—for demolition. One goal of Oliver’s documentation was to foster greater public appreciation for why these places were built in the first place and how they were used. Although they look different than the older structures forming Presidents Circle, Oliver argues, midcentury, Modernist buildings still deserve preservation.

Given the amount of federally owned public lands in Utah, partnerships between the managing federal agencies, interested stakeholders, lessees of federal property, and the public at large are essential in administering the cultural resources on those lands. Richa Wilson, a Forest Service architectural historian, offers an overview of the evolution of Forest Service architecture in Utah dating to the early twentieth century. She shows how buildings constructed in the state’s forests both reflected and departed from mainstream trends. The changing nature of federal
forest management and policies gave each period distinctive design characteristics that continue to be identifiable today.

In his essay, Thomas Carter, an emeritus professor at the University of Utah, argues that historic
preservationists derive cultural meaning through analysis and drawing. Through this series of artistic drawings, Carter highlights a wide range of building types and forms, architectural styles, and influences in construction. His essay also demonstrates the importance of drawing to historic preservation and how that skill is fading with each generation.

Finally, Sheri Murray Ellis, a cultural resource consultant, details the growth and decline of the Ogden Union Stockyard. This large and profitable facility came to exist largely through the instruments of technology—especially the railroad—and, in the end, newer technologies made the yards obsolete. Today, they are the site of redevelopment efforts.

I want to acknowledge my tremendous appreciation to the authors in this issue and to the UHQ editors for their willingness to produce the issue and persistent, professional guidance to oversee its completion.

Kirk Huffaker, Guest Editor
Preservation Utah

 


ARTICLES

Becoming More Conscientious of Utah’s Sites of Conscience
By Kirk Huffaker

Modernism on Campus: Architecture at the University of Utah, 1945–1975
By Bim Oliver

Building the Forest Service in Utah: An Architectural Context
By Richa Wilson

Studying the Unstudied: Utah Drawings from the Western Regional Architecture Program Collection, Marriott Library, University of Utah, 1982–2016
By Thomas Carter

The Last Word in Stockyard Construction: The Rise and Fall of the Ogden Union Stockyard
By Sheri Murray Ellis


BOOK REVIEWS

Leisl Carr Childers, The Size of the Risk: Histories of Multiple Use in the Great Basin. Reviewed by Joseph E. Taylor III

Matthew L. Harris and Newell G. Bringhurst, eds., The Mormon Church and Blacks: A Documentary History. Reviewed by Russell Stevenson

Larry Gerlach, Alma Richards, Olympian. Reviewed by Chris Elzey


BOOK NOTICES

Jonathan Foster, Lake Mead National Recreation Area: A History of America’s First National Playground

Photographs by Peter Goin, Essays by Peter Friederici, A New Form of Beauty: Glen Canyon beyond Climate Change

Modernism at the University of Utah

Editors’ Note: Bim Oliver, author of “Modernism on Campus: Architecture at the University of Utah, 1945-1975,” offers here information on mid-century university building plans that never materialized. Through the process of researching modernism at the University of Utah, Oliver compiled a list of quotations that reveal a light, humorous side of university officials–and these are reproduced below. Finally, we offer additional photographs that didn’t make it into the published article.


Projects That Didn’t Materialize

Like many of the buildings in the post-World War II era, Merrill Engineering was constructed in phases.

The building that exists constitutes the first three phases of the project, completed in relatively short order starting in the late 1950s. But the original concept for the engineering center also envisioned both a circular auditorium and a six-story classroom building. The former was dropped early on, but the classroom building remained an integral part of the center’s design as “Phase IV.” It was never constructed, however, due to lack of funding. Image 3

As the Olpin Union was nearing completion, the Campus Planning Committee contemplated the construction of a “campanile” (bell tower) in the open space just south of the new building. “The campus badly needs some symbol indicative of education that will complete the triangle within the city,” the committee observed in 1958, “i.e., the capitol dome represents State government, the temple, religion and perhaps a campanile to represent education, and which can be plainly seen just as the other two elements are.” Although the campanile was never built, the Social and Behavioral Sciences Building eventually served as the landmark envisioned by the committee. Image 4

The bookstore today occupies the same site that it occupied in the years following World War II. Busy as it is today, it was considered of secondary significance by university planners. More to the point, they felt that its location was better suited for “a heavy use faculty, administrative or academic use.” So they considered two primary alternatives: a new building north of the Union and a structure between the Union and Orson Spencer Hall, “designed as an underground facility, with the floor level approximately the same as the level of the major academic mall.” Due to funding limitations, however, neither was constructed.

As noted in the related article, the primary funder of Pioneer Memorial Theater, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, asked the architects to draw up plans for Pioneer Memorial Theater as a structure that replicated the Salt Lake Theater that had been located downtown for several decades. An early drawing shows this replica that was later dispensed with in favor of a more Modernist design that better accommodated the technical requirements of the theater. Image 5

There were other proposals—some conceptual, some refined—that would have significantly changed the character of campus:

  • Two campus planning maps from 1959 and 1960 showed the library as an octagon and a circle, respectively, rather than the square that exists today. As the design was finalized, administrators suggested etching inspirational quotations into the cast-stone panels that enclosed the library, an idea rejected by the architects.
  • Early site plans and renderings of the plaza to the east of the Social and Behavioral Sciences Building envisioned an elaborate fountain.
  • An architect’s rendering of the Eccles Health Sciences Library included an expansive plaza between the library to the east, the Medical Center to the north, and the College of Pharmacy to the south.
  • Options for the medical towers and townhouses south of the Medical Center included the use of Sunset Tower (recently completed at 40 South 900 East), as well as a much larger complex on the current site that would have incorporated a varying configuration of high rises and lower “garden type” apartments.
  • In the late 1960s, as the university sought to increase its supply of married student housing, planners considered developing over 200 units at the mouth of Red Butte Canyon.
  • A primary goal during the post-World War II era was to concentrate academic buildings near the center of campus. One concept considered for achieving this goal was to construct two 14-story structures—one for the Chemistry Department and one for the Physics Department. As one planner noted, however, “Shoehorning two such units into that restricted area would be most difficult, as well as visually unpleasant.”
  • Early renderings and models for the Medical Center, Special Events Center, College of Pharmacy, and Physics Building reflect significantly different design ideas than those that were actually constructed.

Humorous Quotes from Author’s Research Notes

  • “This will be a place where future wives will be trained on how to turn out the hash without burning it.” (W.J. O’Connor, chair of the Board of Regents, at the October 1951 groundbreaking for the Sterling Sill Home Living Center)
  • “At an earlier date, I received a memo from you posing the hazard that the rocks to the east of the Union Building and Orson Spencer Hall could be if we were to have a riot on campus.” (Memo from B. Blain Bradford to Bruce H. Jensen in July of 1970)
  • “Most people would agree that the fountain (Tanner Fountain across the plaza from the library) seems to be attracting the ‘undesirable’ hippie type clientele who are oftentimes quite dirty and unkempt.” (Memo from J Elroy Jones in July of 1970) Image 1
  • “Dean Hiner (College of Pharmacy) said his faculty could get along with anybody; however, if it (the site for the new College of Pharmacy building) went to the Medical Center he wanted it understood that his profession was a dignified profession and was not to be browbeaten by the Medics.” (Memo from Martin Brixen in March of 1958)
  • “Since the development of married student housing will cut out about four holes on the golf course, it was decided that detailed plans should be drawn up as quickly as possible in order that it could be explained to the Fort Douglas Club people.” (Minutes of the Planning Committee in August of 1956)
  • Avard Fairbanks first dean of the College of Fine Arts (reacting to the emergence of Modernist ideas on campus): “The corruption of art students’ principles stems from being exposed to foreign art manglers, the subversive doctrine of [-]isms, Communist-inspired and Communist-connected. These influences have one boasted goal: the destruction of our cultural tradition and priceless heritage.” (quoted in Anne Palmer Peterson. Years of Promise: The University of Utah’s A. Ray Olpin Era, 1946-1964. Salt Lake City, Utah: University of Utah Press, 2009.)
  • Orson Spencer Hole (Utah Daily Chronicle, April 17, 1956) Image 2

Photo Gallery

Image 1. Tanner Fountain. Courtesy of University of Utah Archives.

Image 2. From the Utah Daily Chronicle, April 17, 1956. Courtesy of Utah Digital Newspapers.

Image 3. This initial concept for the Merrill Engineering Center included a circular auditorium and six-story classroom building. Courtesy of University of Utah Marriott Library Special Collections.

 

 

Image 4. The original plans for the Union building included a “campanile” or bell tower in the area to the south of the building. Courtesy of University of Utah Archives.

Image 5. An early rendering of Pioneer Memorial Theater as a replica of the Salt Lake Theater. Courtesy of University of Utah Archives.

 

Utah World War I Commission

April 2017 marked the centennial of America’s entry into World War I, a defining conflict of the modern era.

To commemorate the sacrifice and involvement of Utahns in the Great War, the Utah WWI Commission will provide information and resources to the public.

Utah’s World War I Monuments, which details WWI memorials throughout the state, is available for free as a PDF.

Grants

The commission is offering small grants to encourage Utahns to recognize the impact of WWI in their communities.

Resources

Educational resources, archival finding aids, and much more.

Events

Event listings will be updated regularly. If you know of a WWI-related event in Utah, email us at vjacobson@utah.gov.

Remembering

Coming soon: photo gallery, list of Utah’s WWI dead, and monuments.

Contact Us

Valerie Jacobson, WWI Commission Project Manager
E-mail: vjacobson@utah.gov

300 S. Rio Grande Street
Salt Lake City, UT 84101

Utah Historical Quarterly Current Issue


Volume 86, Number 1 (Winter 2018 Issue):


Published since 1928, the Utah Historical Quarterly is the state’s premier history journal and the source for reliable, engaging Utah history. Join the Historical Society for your own copy.

Each issue of the Utah Historical Quarterly is accompanied with rich web supplements that introduce readers to sources, photos, interviews, and other engaging material. These “extras” are located at history.utah.gov/uhqextras.

WEB EXTRAS: See here 


IN THIS ISSUE


The Utah Historical Quarterly has historically seen itself as a state journal that explores Utah history in the regional context of the American West. For all of the focus on Utah history, the UHQ sought to address frameworks and subjects beyond the state’s geopolitical boundaries to those across the Great Basin, Colorado Plateau, and greater Intermountain West.

Over the last ninety years, the journal has published articles that have variously looked at Utah history as an entity in itself and others that have placed it within a regional context. Both approaches can lead to fine works of history. But we are committed to the idea that to deeply understand Utah, readers must interact with a host of overlapping subjects and geographical contexts, often offered in combination with history’s allied fields (geography, archeology, cultural studies, and others). With this in mind, the editorial team, with approval of the Advisory Board of Editors, revised our editorial statement to affirm our commitment to a regional, interdisciplinary approach to Utah history. This statement will be published in the inside front cover of each issue.

In the twenty-first century, with the wide availability of information, the fracturing and specialization of subject matter, and, even, the loss of faith in a shared body of knowledge, the UHQ aspires as we have done since 1928 to bring you evidentiary, peer-reviewed history that spans across all regions and pertains to all groups and communities that make Utah home. To continue to make that happen, we are pleased to announce the creation of the Miriam B. Murphy / Thomas G. Alexander Editorial Fellow. In partnership with the History Department at the University of Utah and the Charles Redd Center for Western Studies at Brigham Young University, this academic-year award is offered to a deserving candidate enrolled in the University of Utah’s history graduate program. This year the Miriam B. Murphy Editorial Fellow is Alexandria Waltz, and we are currently accepting applications for the Thomas G. Alexander Editorial Fellow to work alongside UHQ staff during the 2018–2019 academic year. For more on the fellowship and its namesakes, see pages 69-71.

We are deeply grateful to the History Department at the University of Utah and to the Redd Center at Brigham Young University for their financial assistance and partnership to make the Fellow award possible. Fundraising in the years to come will be needed, and if the pursuit and publishing of exceptional history interests you, I would be delighted to speak to you about financial contributions to this annual editorial appointment. The Fellow award is but one area of close collaboration between the journal and the state’s institutions of higher learning.

Finally, before I introduce this issue’s articles, I invite each of you to take part in our 2018 annual statewide theme and conference, Transportation and Movement. In recognition of the upcoming commemoration of America’s first transcontinental railroad in May 1869, the Utah State Historical Society aims to highlight this singular national historical event and the centrality of transportation and movement in Utah and western history. Archaeology and Preservation Month in May, with its associated partnership events held across Utah, will center on this theme, as will a host of other events and exhibitions sponsored or supported by the Society. The year culminates with the 66th annual Utah History Conference to be held at the Cultural Celebration Center on September 27–28. There, scholars, academics, public historians, local historians, educators, film documentarians, book dealers, and people interested in history will explore the latest scholarship, writing, and sources on this theme and other aspects of Utah history. I thank all of you for your participation at past conferences and, more broadly, for your love of and interest in what we do at the Society. By attending the conference and lectures, reading the UHQ, and perusing online materials, I hope you see the value that the Society brings to the study and public consumption of history in Utah.

The essays in this issue bring attention to topics that will be intimately familiar to some readers. In the nineteenth century, overland pioneers and travelers to Salt Lake City frequently passed through Mountain Dell, located as it was along the emigrants’ road. Today, it is a fly-by place in Parley’s Canyon along the Interstate 80 corridor where golfers and Nordic skiers go for recreation. Our first essay contextualizes the changes that occurred there, from a way station and village community with a school, post office, and other amenities, to Salt Lake City water works that displaced local residents on behalf of watershed protection.

Some readers may remember, and even possibly participated in, the antiwar protests of the Vietnam era. The second essay centers on Stephen Holbrook, a young Utahan inspired by his participation in the Freedom Summer Project in Mississippi, who led antiwar demonstrations in his home state. The work published here examines the cultural and religious factors that contributed to Holbrook’s world view that emphasized cooperation and collaboration over antagonism and violence. The Utah scene and the movement Holbrook orchestrated, with its relatively few violent disturbances, complicate popular perceptions of protests nationwide.

Our final essays reflect on the local histories that surround us all. In this issue, spurred on by local leader and Manila, Utah, resident RaNae Wilde, we offer reflections on a county and its communities that have traditionally received little love in the historical literature about Utah. The place: Daggett County. The occasion: the county’s centennial commemoration. As the smallest county in the state’s geopolitical configuration, Daggett is sparsely populated and geographically isolated, at least from Utah, since it is more associated with and easily accessible from Wyoming’s Green River basin. Our third essays reflects on the oft-ignored themes associated with Daggett, as well as it historical, cultural, and political position in the Intermountain West. Finally, we publish a review essay that evaluates the work and contribution of one of the most ubiquitous publishers of local history, Arcadia Publishing. From works on local communities by local authors, Arcadia fills a niche for histories that are familiar and reflect the nostalgia of a people.

Brad Westwood
Publisher/Editor


ARTICLES

Ghosts of Mountain Dell: Transportation and Technological Change in the Wasatch Mountains
By Cullen Battle

Reexamining the Radical: Stephen Holbrook and the Utah Strategy for Protesting the Vietnam War
By Scott Thomas

Daggett Count at 100: New Approaches to a Colorful Past
By Clint Pumphrey

DEPARTMENTS

Rolling to the 150th: Sesquicentennial of the Transcontinental Railroad
By Christopher W. Merritt, Michael R. Polk, Ken Cannon, Michael Sheehan, Glenn Stelter, and Ray Kelsey


BOOK REVIEWS

John L. Kessell, Whither the Waters: Mapping the Great Basin from Bernardo de Miera to John C. Fremont. Reviewed by Paul Nelson

Samuel M. Otterstrom, From California’s Gold Fields to the Mendocino Coast: A Settlement History Across Time and Place. Reviewed by Christopher Herbert

Shirley Ann Wilson Moore, Sweet Freedom’s Plains: African Americans on the Overland Trails, 1841-1869. Reviewed by W. Paul Reeve

Robert S. McPherson, Fighting in Canyon Country: Native American Conflict, 500 AD to the 1920s. Reviewed by John D. Barton

Thomas W. Simpson, American Universities and the Birth of Modern Mormonism, 1867-1940. Reviewed by Allyson Mower


 

 

Rural Utah, Western Issues – 64th Annual Utah State History Conference Program

Online registration is now closed.  Walk in registrations will be accepted as space allows. 

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Conference at a Glance

Conference Workshops, Seminars
Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016
9:00 a.m. – noon
4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Rio Grande Depot
300 S. Rio Grande Street
Salt Lake City, UT

9:00 a.m. –  noon Introduction to Oral History (Zephyr Room) (WORKSHOP IS FULL)
(Co-sponsored by Utah Humanities)
9:00 a.m. –  noon Historic Preservation Workshop (West Lecture Room) (WORKSHOP IS FULL)
9:00 a.m. – noon Well, isn’t that Spatial?”: GIS, Mapping Historical and Cultural Resources (Utah State Archives Training Room – 346 S. Rio Grande Street) (WORKSHOP IS FULL)
4:00 p.m – 6:00 p.m. Teacher Training Prehistory Workshop (Zephyr Room)

 

Conference Panels, Sessions
Friday, Sept. 30, 2016
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Utah Cultural Celebration Center
1355 West 3100 South
West Valley, UT

9:00 – 10:15 a.m. Plenary Session: Historical Perspectives on the Public Lands Debate in the American WestDr. Gregory Smoak, Dr. Leisl Carr Childers, Dr. Joseph E. Taylor III (Great Hall)
10:30 – 11:45 a.m. World War I in Utah (Room 101)
Early Rural Utah in the Uinta Basin (Room 102)
  Evaluating The Awkward State of Utah (Room 104)
  Accessing Statewide Heritage Resources (Room 105)
  Bringing the Art of Decorative Paper Cutting into the Twenty-first Century (Board Room)
12 – 1:30 p.m. Keynote: Quicksand, Cactus, and the Power of History in Polarized Times: Bringing Juanita Brooks and Dale L. Morgan Back into Our ConversationDr. Patty Limerick (Great Hall)
1:45 – 3:00 p.m. What Role Do Historians Play in Public Land and Water Policy? (Rooms 101 & 102)
  New Methods, Historical Innovation (Room 104)
  Evolving Small Towns (Room 105)
  The Personal and the Political (Great Hall – west)
  Lark Public Event (Great Hall – east)
  Lark Oral Histories (Board Room)
3:15 – 4:30 p.m. Rural Utah, National Destinations (Rooms 101 & 102)
  Voices from the Desert: Rural Issues in Southeastern Utah (Room 104)
  Land Stewardship in Northern Utah (Room 105)
  Industrial and Natural Landscapes (Great Hall – west)
  Lark Public Event (Great Hall – east)
  Lark Oral Histories (Board Room)

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Conference Tour (TOUR IS FULL)
Saturday, Oct. 1, 2016
9:00 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Hosted by Fort Douglas Military Museum.   Battle or massacre? Historians still debate the events of that cold winter day in January 1863 when soldiers from Camp Douglas attacked a village of Shoshone on the Bear River near the Utah-Idaho border. Follow the route of the soldiers as the marched north from Camp Doulas and walk the site of the actual battle. An informative and thought provoking day exploring Utah’s historic past.

Cost:     $65 per person (includes transportation, lunch and field trip booklet)

**Please note that a separate paid registration is required for this tour and is not part of the free conference.  Please call 801-581-1251 or email admin@fortdouglas.org to register. (TOUR IS FULL, NO MORE REGISTRATIONS ARE BEING ACCEPTED)


Thank you to our conference sponsors:

American Institute of Architects (Utah chapter), American Planning Association (Utah chapter), American West Center (U of U), Ames Construction, Charles Redd Center for Western Studies (BYU), Chevron, Fort Douglas Military Museum, Governor’s Office of Economic Development, J. Willard Marriott Library (U of U), LDS Church History Department, National Park Service, Resonance Printing Solutions, U of U History Department, USU History Department, Utah Cultural Celebration Center, Utah Humanities, Utah Westerners.

UHQ State History Research

State History Research

At State History, we’re all about helping you conduct professional or personal research in a quick, efficient manner. We know that you want to find what you’re looking for so you can move on with your research. Check out some of our most popular research tools and resources:

History

  • Publications Search – online access to all of State History’s publications, including back issues of Utah Historical Quarterly, all twenty-nine county histories, and the full set of Beehive History, Utah Preservation, and other periodicals
  • Utah History to Go – a comprehensive online course for Utah history, containing articles, exhibits, and historic photographs
  • I Love History – an engaging resource for kids and grade-school students

Historic Preservation & Archeology

Collections and Databases

External resources

Research Libraries and Archives

Online Primary Sources

  • Utah Digital Newspapers – first statewide newspaper digitization program to pass 1 million pages in content, this site has papers ranging from the 1850s to 2010
  • Library of Congress – the research arm of Congress and the largest library in the world, with millions of books, recordings, photographs, maps, and manuscripts in its collections
  • Highway 89 Collection – online exhibit of photographs, manuscripts, and printed items
  • Western Waters Digital Library – digital collection of resources on water in the West
  • Utah American Indian Digital Archive – portal to digital resources about the history and culture of Utah’s native peoples
  • Ancestry – an online resource for family trees and related genealogical information, as well as historical photos and records

Museums and Other Local Resources

Oral Histories

The Southern Utah Oral History Project

Research Requests

We sometimes receive research requests and inquiries from press officers, historians, researchers, public and private organizations, and interested citizens. Although we cannot devote a great deal of time to these inquiries, we are happy to direct individuals and organizations to salient resources. On occasion, we are able to provide more involved research assistance. Let us know how we can assist by contacting:

Utah Historical Quarterly editors at uhq@utah.gov or (801) 245–7209 or (801) 245–7257

When information from our collections or from our editors is published or otherwise used in print or online, please use the source/courtesy line: Utah State Historical Society and/or Utah Historical Quarterly. Please also refer readers to our homepage: uhq.utah.gov.

Appreciate our services and collections? Love Utah History? Show your support by becoming a member of the Utah State Historical Society today at www.heritage.utah.gov/history/become-a-member or by “liking” us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/UtahStateHistory.

 

Historical Resources for Grade School Students (see also Utah History Day)

Thank you for contacting Utah State History. The standard seventh-grade school text on Utah history is The Utah Journey, published by Gibbs Smith. For even younger students, we recommend State History's website “I Love History” (ilovehistory.utah.gov) as an engaging resource for Utah history. A fun book for kids is Will Bagley and Pat Bagley's This is the Place: A Crossroads of Utah's Past (2001). High-school and college students would benefit from Thomas G. Alexander's Utah, The Right Place (2003). An interesting blog on Utah history, suitable for 4th and 7th grade-age students, is “The Mystery of Utah History”. The blog's creator, Lynn Arave, was for many years a reporter for the Deseret News.

For additional resources, we highly recommend consulting State History's homepage for a number of good links and resources (http://heritage.utah.gov/history/research-history). If you are interested in specific topics, events, or people in Utah history, visit “Utah History To Go” and our digitized collection of the Utah Historical Quarterly and other Utah State Historical Society publications at uhq.utah.gov.

The Division of State History is proud to operate Utah History Day, the National History Day affiliate for Utah students in grades 4-12. History Day brings history to life for kids by giving them the tools to become amateur historians. Kids learn how to do real historical research, then create a final project that showcases their work. Projects are judged in a series of competitions that culminate in annual state and national contests. Visit our website (Utahhistoryfair.weebly.com/research-resources.html) for history resources helpful to kids working on their projects. To contact the state coordinator, email utahhistoryday@gmail.com.