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Exhibition at the Utah State Capitol Highlights the Work of Utah Women

For immediate release               

December 17, 2014

 

Exhibition at the Utah State Capitol Highlights the Work of Utah Women

“Women Artists of Utah” celebrates a selection of remarkable works by Utah women. Women have always been active and essential participants in our cultural heritage. This exhibit includes a variety of works, from early Utah masters to present-day emerging and established artists who have contributed to Utah’s rich artistic history. The breadth of work on view showcases a spectrum of artistic styles, from the collection’s inception in 1899 to work being produced by Utah’s contemporary women artists. “Women have always played an important role in the arts; especially in Utah as Alice Merrill Horne, who once elected to the legislature in 1899, established what is now the Utah Division of Arts & Museums” says Utah Arts & Museums director Lynnette Hiskey. “We are proud to own so many important works of art by Utah’s talented women.” The exhibition will be on display in the Utah State Capitol Building Dec. 23 – Mar. 13, 2015 on the fourth floor gallery.

One of those talented women is Susan Makov. “I have had great teaching colleagues and wonderful artist friends. There has never been a question of their talent or passion for their work. But of course passion alone does not make a career; there must be opportunity as well,” says Makov. “In large cities like New York, one may find opportunities to show work at influential and eminent institutions like the Museum of Modern Art. I chose to teach as my main career, and Utah and the American West offered me great prospects on that path. I know that being a professional artist means perseverance and dedication to the calling over decades and making a living doing it, like any other professional.”

Keisha Goeckeritz, whose piece Scribbles No. 10 was just purchased in 2013 when she was a student, will also be featured in this exhibit.  “I’ve always thought of myself as any other person that’s an artist, but there’s this worry that women artists tend to forfeit their abilities to obscurity.” Goeckeritz continues, “To me, being an artist isn’t a career, it’s what I am.”

If you have questions about this exhibit or the State of Utah Fine Art Collection, please contact Jim Glenn at jglenn@utah.gov or 801.245.7271 or Emily Johnsonemilyjohnson@utah.gov 801.363.0298