Tag Archives: Utah Historical Quarterly

UHQ Spring 2018 Web Extras

Re-discovering the 1931 Claflin-Emerson Expedition

Jerry D. Spangler and James M. Aton, The Crimson Cowboys: The Remarkable Odyssey of the Claflin-Emerson Expedition

Read how modern archaeologists rediscovered a 1931 expedition and see photos from 1931 and the present.

 

Researching Turn-of-the-Century Women

Polly Aird, Small but Significant: The School of Nursing at Provo General Hospital, 1904–1924

Follow this link for Aird’s exhaustive research files about the lives of nurses at Provo General Hospital.

 

Maps, Mapmakers, and Nineteenth-Century Exploration

Sheri Wysong, The Mountain Men, the Cartographers, and the Lakes

See the maps analyzed in Wysong’s article and read her narrative of the life of David H. Burr.

Sarah Vowell discusses the life of the dour Charles Preuss, “The Homesick Explorer.”

 

The Power of Oral History

Randy Williams, Voices from Drug Court: Community-Based Oral History at Utah State University

 Access audio from 2017 conference session about “Voices from Drug Court” and audio and transcripts from the entire oral history project.

UHQ Summer 2017 Web Extras

The University of Utah and the Utes, As Seen in the Utonian

The University of Utah took up the Ute name and imagery in the early twentieth century, just when other professional and collegiate teams did so, and since then its representation has run the gamut from the offensive to the more benign. Here we include a gallery of images the U’s yearbook.

 

 

Rape Law in Mid-Twentieth-Century Utah

Many things–including changing laws and misleading statistics–complicate the study of sexual violence. Still, it is possible to tell that during the 1930s and 1940s, the number of rapes in Utah rose. This occurred at a time when the court system was quite hostile to female victims. Click here for a document related to a case discussed at length in the summer 2017 issue of UHQ.

 

Documents from the Creation of Cedar Breaks National Monument

On August 22, 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed a proclamation creating a national monument at Cedar Breaks. The following July, residents of Iron County, joined by state and national dignitaries, formally dedicated the monument. The celebration masked nearly two decades of wrangling between the U.S. Forest Service and the National Park Service, as well as between the towns of Parowan and Cedar City, over the proposed monument. Follow this link for transcribed documents from those years of conflict.

 

 

UHQ Winter 2017 Web Extras

Historic Preservation and Sites of Conscience: A Conversation with Kirk Huffaker

We sat down with Kirk Huffaker, executive director of Preservation Utah and author of Salt Lake City, Then and Now (2008), to discuss the role of historic preservation at places of meaning, what he refers to as sites of conscience. Huffaker is guest editor of the winter 2017 issue of the Utah Historical Quarterly.

 

Modernism at the University of Utah: Research Notes

Bim Oliver, author of “Modernism on Campus: Architecture at the University of Utah, 1945-1975,” offers readers excerpts and quotes from his research notes regarding modernism at the university.

 

Forest Service Architectural Plans and Manuals, 1935-1940

These Forest Service architectural plans and manuals, published between 1935 and 1940, depict the styles and layouts then common to Forest Service structures.

 

 

Utah Historical Quarterly Current Issue

Published since 1928, Utah Historical Quarterly is the state’s premier history journal and the source for reliable, engaging Utah history. Join the Historical Society for your own copy.

Each issue is accompanied by rich web supplements that introduce readers to sources, photos, interviews, and other engaging material.


UHQ Spring 2018 — Volume 86, Number 2


The Crimson Cowboys: The Remarkable Odyssey of the 1931 Claflin-Emerson Expedition
By Jerry D. Spangler and James M. Aton

Read how modern archaeologists rediscovered a 1931 expedition and see photos from 1931 and the present.

 

 

Small but Significant: The School of Nursing at Provo General Hospital, 1904–1924
By Polly Aird

Follow this link for Aird’s exhaustive research files.

 

 

The Mountain Men, the Cartographers, and the Lakes
By Sheri Wysong

See the maps analyzed in Wysong’s article and read her narrative of the life of David H. Burr. Hear Sarah Vowell offer a humorous take on the life of the dour Charles Preuss.

 

 

Remembering Topaz and Wendover
By Christian Heimburger, Jane Beckwith, Donald K. Tamaki, and Edwin P. Hawkins, Jr.

 

 

 

 

Voices from Drug Court: Community-Based Oral History at Utah State University
By Randy Williams

Access audio from a 2017 conference session about “Voices from Drug Court” and audio and transcripts from the entire project.

 


IN THIS ISSUE

During the summer of 1931, a team from Harvard began exploring the rich archaeology of the Tavaputs Plateau and the Uinta Basin. The Claflin-Emerson Expedition, as it was known, was an ambitious venture that required some 400 miles of horseback travel. The expedition produced information of great value to other researchers that remained unpublished and essentially untouched for decades. In the spring of 1989, Jerry Spangler “stumbled upon” his first Claflin-Emerson Expedition site in Nine Mile Canyon, “A series of round, semi-subterranean pit houses on a bench overlooking the valley floor. Below one pit-house floor, we excavated the burial of a child. . . . At the time, I did not know that it was one of the many sites the Claflin-Emerson team first visited in 1931 in Nine Mile—no one did—because we did not have access to their 1931 field journals and they never published a report.”[1] In the first article of this issue of Utah Historical Quarterly, Spangler joins with James Aton in revisiting the sites explored by the Harvard team and recreating the social aspects of this “last great horseback adventure in the history of American archaeology.”

In the mid-1910s, Venice Foote, a young woman from Provo, Utah, followed in the footsteps of an older sister and began training at Provo General Hospital’s nursing school. As Foote’s life progressed, she married and had children but she also served as a private nurse for Reed Smoot’s family and as the chief psychiatric nurse at the Utah State Hospital—accomplishments dependent upon her training. All told, some forty-four women graduated from Provo General’s nursing program; it was, as Polly Aird argues, “small but significant.” Because of their nursing educations, most of those women obtained meaningful work in hospitals, maternity homes, public health institutions, and elsewhere. Aird uses public records and, especially, the tools of genealogical research to reconstruct the school’s history and painstakingly trace the life of each woman who attended it.

In our third article, Sheri Wysong ponders how Pruess Lake, a small feature on the Utah-Nevada border, came to be named for Charles Preuss, a cartographer who never visited it. Through careful comparison of historical maps, Wysong reaches a fascinating, complex answer. It involves many of the explorers and mapmakers of the nineteenth century—including William Ashley, Jedediah Smith, Charles Preuss, and David H. Burr—and a second lake, Beaver, that no longer exists. The history of the naming of Pruess Lake and its connection to Beaver Lake hints at efforts to honor Charles Preuss and teaches about the shifting representation of geography in the American West.

Fourth, we present a collection of speeches and essays that consider two difficult moments in American history: the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II and the use of the atomic bomb. Written by a scholar of the Japanese-American experience, the founder of the Topaz Museum, an attorney who argued Korematsu v. United States (1983), and a lifelong liaison between Japan and American, these pieces ask how we can thoughtfully deal with the past in public forums.

Our fifth piece, an update from the Fife Folklore Archives, discusses the background of the Cache Valley Utah Drug Court Oral History Project. This significant public history project used oral history methodology to preserve the experiences of drug court participants. Finally, as with too many recent numbers of UHQ, the spring issue closes with a memorial to a great scholar of Utah history.

[1] Jerry D. Spangler, “Re-discovering the 1931 Claflin-Emerson Expedition,” Utah Historical Quarterly Web Extras, accessed June 14, 2018, history.utah.gov/uhqextras.

Book Reviews

Gregory F. Michno, Depredation and Deceit: The Making of the Jicarilla and Ute Wars in New Mexico
Reviewed by Jennifer Macias

Steven G. Baker, Rick Hendricks, and Gail Carroll Sargent, Juan Rivera’s Colorado, 1765: The First Spaniards among the Ute and Paiute Indians on the Trail to Teguayo
Reviewed by Robert McPherson

Catherine S. Fowler and Darla Garey-Sage, eds., Isabel T. Kelly’s Southern Paiute Ethnographic Field Notes, 1932–1934, Las Vegas
Reviewed by Heidi Roberts

Richard E. Turley, Jr., Janiece L. Johnson, and LaJean Purcell Carruth, eds., Mountain Meadows Massacre: Collected Legal Papers
Reviewed by Gene A. Sessions

Book Notices

Robert S. McPherson and Fin Bayles, Cowboying in Canyon Country: The Life and Rhymes of Fin Bayles, Cowboy Poet

Michael Austin and Ardis E. Parshall, eds., Dime Novel Mormons

Roberta Flake Clayton, Catherine H. Ellis, and David F. Boone, Pioneer Women of Arizona, 2nd ed.

News from Salt Lake, 1847-1849: A Conversation with Andrew H. Hedges

We spoke with Andrew H. Hedges about his article in the Utah Historical Quarterly (Summer 2016), “News from Salt Lake, 1847-1849,” detailing the flow of information into and out of the Great Basin in the first years after Mormon settlement.

UHQ State History Research

State History Research

At State History, we’re all about helping you conduct professional or personal research in a quick, efficient manner. We know that you want to find what you’re looking for so you can move on with your research. Check out some of our most popular research tools and resources:

History

  • Publications Search – online access to all of State History’s publications, including back issues of Utah Historical Quarterly, all twenty-nine county histories, and the full set of Beehive History, Utah Preservation, and other periodicals
  • Utah History to Go – a comprehensive online course for Utah history, containing articles, exhibits, and historic photographs
  • I Love History – an engaging resource for kids and grade-school students

Historic Preservation & Archeology

Collections and Databases

External resources

Research Libraries and Archives

Online Primary Sources

  • Utah Digital Newspapers – first statewide newspaper digitization program to pass 1 million pages in content, this site has papers ranging from the 1850s to 2010
  • Library of Congress – the research arm of Congress and the largest library in the world, with millions of books, recordings, photographs, maps, and manuscripts in its collections
  • Highway 89 Collection – online exhibit of photographs, manuscripts, and printed items
  • Western Waters Digital Library – digital collection of resources on water in the West
  • Utah American Indian Digital Archive – portal to digital resources about the history and culture of Utah’s native peoples
  • Ancestry – an online resource for family trees and related genealogical information, as well as historical photos and records

Museums and Other Local Resources

Oral Histories

The Southern Utah Oral History Project

Research Requests

We sometimes receive research requests and inquiries from press officers, historians, researchers, public and private organizations, and interested citizens. Although we cannot devote a great deal of time to these inquiries, we are happy to direct individuals and organizations to salient resources. On occasion, we are able to provide more involved research assistance. Let us know how we can assist by contacting:

Utah Historical Quarterly editors at uhq@utah.gov or (801) 245–7209 or (801) 245–7257

When information from our collections or from our editors is published or otherwise used in print or online, please use the source/courtesy line: Utah State Historical Society and/or Utah Historical Quarterly. Please also refer readers to our homepage: uhq.utah.gov.

Appreciate our services and collections? Love Utah History? Show your support by becoming a member of the Utah State Historical Society today at www.heritage.utah.gov/history/become-a-member or by “liking” us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/UtahStateHistory.

 

Historical Resources for Grade School Students (see also Utah History Day)

Thank you for contacting Utah State History. The standard seventh-grade school text on Utah history is The Utah Journey, published by Gibbs Smith. For even younger students, we recommend State History's website “I Love History” (ilovehistory.utah.gov) as an engaging resource for Utah history. A fun book for kids is Will Bagley and Pat Bagley's This is the Place: A Crossroads of Utah's Past (2001). High-school and college students would benefit from Thomas G. Alexander's Utah, The Right Place (2003). An interesting blog on Utah history, suitable for 4th and 7th grade-age students, is “The Mystery of Utah History”. The blog's creator, Lynn Arave, was for many years a reporter for the Deseret News.

For additional resources, we highly recommend consulting State History's homepage for a number of good links and resources (http://heritage.utah.gov/history/research-history). If you are interested in specific topics, events, or people in Utah history, visit “Utah History To Go” and our digitized collection of the Utah Historical Quarterly and other Utah State Historical Society publications at uhq.utah.gov.

The Division of State History is proud to operate Utah History Day, the National History Day affiliate for Utah students in grades 4-12. History Day brings history to life for kids by giving them the tools to become amateur historians. Kids learn how to do real historical research, then create a final project that showcases their work. Projects are judged in a series of competitions that culminate in annual state and national contests. Visit our website (Utahhistoryfair.weebly.com/research-resources.html) for history resources helpful to kids working on their projects. To contact the state coordinator, email utahhistoryday@gmail.com.

 

 

UHQ Format

Manuscripts should follow the Chicago Manual of Style (16th ed.) as closely as possible. Submit manuscripts as e-mail attachments, on CDs, or on thumb drives, to:

Editors
Utah Historical Quarterly
300 S. Rio Grande
Salt Lake City, Utah 84101-1182
uhq@utah.gov

UHQ Become A Member

Being a member of the Utah State Historical Society means being a member of one of the oldest historical organizations in the state of Utah.

Members receive the Utah Historical Quarterly—filled with fascinating and illuminating articles—four times each year and are often invited to members-only events focused on the history of Utah.

Choose your membership level:

  • Student/Senior Citizen $25 
  • Daughters of Utah Pioneers Members $25
  • Individual $30
  • Institution/Business $40
  • Sustaining $40
  • Patron $60
  • Sponsor $100
  • Life $500

Join or renew your membership with the Utah State Historical Society, click HERE 

Or complete the membership application and mail it with a check to:

Utah State Historical Society
c/o Membership
300 S. Rio Grande Street
Salt Lake City, UT 84101

OR

Contact Lisa Buckmiller at lbuckmiller@utah.gov or at 801-245-7231.