Tag Archives: Utah History Conference

66th Annual Utah History Conference

Transportation and Movement

September 27 – 29, 2018

It’s possible to read Utah history as a story of movement and transportation. The centrality of movement to exploration, industry, and travel—major themes in Utah history—is obvious. Less so is the way movement can be seen on a more conceptual level as a way to evaluate change over space and time: the variation and transformation of the landscape, the flow of ideas and people into and out of the state, the mobility of groups and individuals, the development of transportation-related infrastructure, and the transportation and communication networks connecting the state to regional and national systems.

The flow of ideas and people is now more global than ever before, rendering traditional boundaries that confined physical movement less operable.

The Utah State Historical Society, thanks to our generous sponsors, offers the conference free to scholars, writers, educators, students, and the general public. Registration is required.

Registration is now closed


CONFERENCE SCHEDULE OVERVIEW

Thursday, September 27 
9:00 am–5:00 pm
Workshops
Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City

Friday, September 28 
7:45 am – check in and morning refreshments
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Plenary, lunchtime keynote and awards presentation, history and panel sessions
Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 West 3100 South, West Valley

Keynote
Living the First Transcontinental Life

David Haward Bain

As author of the award-winning, much lauded Empire Express, The Old Iron Road, and other books, David Bain has written “I have always lived within the sound of a train whistle.” In the 14 years he spent researching and writing Express and the five years for Old Iron Road, he had many adventures, whether out on sunbaked routes or in the many libraries and archives he habituated. Even the publishing path was fraught with alarms. Lively anecdotes and vivid “magic lantern slides” abound in this talk about researching in the weeds, appraising the historical personalities and points of view, contending with terrible penmanship, and, as he has said, “writing and structuring history like a novelist—just not making things up!” Bain has taught writing and literature at Middlebury College in Vermont for more than 30 years, and his connection to the August Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference has been unbroken for nearly four decades.

Empire Express is an epic narrative history covering not only the dramatic struggle to link the oceans with twin bands of iron but three decades in which America doubled in size, fought three wars, and discovered itself. A main selection of the Book of the Month Club and a selection of the History Book Club, Empire Express was a finalist both for the Los Angeles Times Book Award in History and the Francis Parkman Prize, and won the New England Historical Association’s and the National Railroad and Locomotive Historical Society’s annual book prizes; the author was elected a Fellow in the Society of American Historians. The work was featured on Brian Lamb’s C-SPAN show, “Booknotes” and adapted by PBS “The American Experience” into a 2-hour documentary. See http://www.davidhbain.com/

Plenary
Is Utah Still the Crossroads of the West?

The panel will examine the notion in all its dimensions—in terms of the state’s geographic position but also cultural and economic influence—and whether the idea of crossroads is still a useful and accurate concept to think about Utah history and the state in the twenty-first century.

Panelist are David Haward Bain, John M. Findlay, Juliette Tennert, and Fred E. Woods; moderated by Jeffrey D. Nichols

Saturday, September 29th
Pony Express in Utah Tour
Transcontinental Railroad Tour



DETAILED CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

Thursday, September 27
Workshops

Using Volunteers to Expand Your Reach
Mary Buehler and Jacob Johnson
9:00 am – 3:30 pm (45 min break for lunch – on your own)
Zephyr Conference Room, Rio Grande Depot
300 S. Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City, UT

Have you wondered how volunteers support your mission and vision? Join UServeUtah as we discuss why using volunteers is important and review the first steps to organizing a volunteer program. We’ll cover position descriptions, recruitment, retention, and recognition. You’ll walk away with a clear vision about what you can do to leverage the power of volunteers to expand your efforts. We look forward to seeing you there!

Utah Geographic Names: how geographic names in Utah are proposed, managed, and officially reviewed (WORKSHOP IS FULL.  NO FURTHER REGISTRATIONS ARE BEING ACCEPTED)
Arie Leeflang
9:00 am – 10:30 am
West Lecture Room, Rio Grande Depot

The names associated with natural geographic features often carry significant history, character, and meaning for the nearby communities or local cultural groups. Since 1890 and 1978 respectively, the U.S Board on Geographic Names and the Utah Committee on Geographic Names have been reviewing proposed geographic names in an effort to standardize naming efforts. This workshop will address how geographic names are proposed and reviewed – including the various national policies the state Committee and national Board follow. Resources on researching geographic names will be also covered. Finally, current trends and topics in geographic names, including the recent Grandstaff Canyon proposal, will be reviewed.

Family History Meets History (WORKSHOP IS FULL.  NO FURTHER REGISTRATIONS ARE BEING ACCEPTED)
Holly George, UHQ, and Beth Taylor, FamilySearch
1:00 pm–3:30 pm
Board Room, Rio Grande Depot
300 S. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City

The world of family history has much to offer—both tools and stories—to the writers of history. At the same time, historical writing and genealogical work are not always the same thing.

This workshop will address
1) How to use the tools of family history research in historical writing
2) How to craft family stories into articles for journals such as Utah Historical Quarterly

Utah History in 3D: The Use of 21st Century Technologies in Archaeology (WORKSHOP IS FULL.  NO FURTHER REGISTRATIONS ARE BEING ACCEPTED)
Shawn Lambert
1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
West Lecture Room, Rio Grande Depot
300 S. Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City

When people think of archaeology, they mainly think of excavations and artifact recovery. There is another facet of archaeology that involves photogrammetry and 3D printing technologies. In this workshop, you will receive an introduction to photogrammetry and 3D printing and their applications in archaeology and public outreach.

Friday, September 28

7:45 am – 9:00 am:  Check in and morning refreshments

9:00 am – 10:15 am: Opening Plenary

History Session 1:  10:30 am – 11:45 am

12:00 pm – 1:30 pm:  Lunchtime Keynote Speech by David Haward Bain, author of “Empire Express: Building the First Transcontinental Railroad” and Outstanding Achievement Awards Program, by Dina Blaes, Chair, Board of State History

History Session 2:  1:45 pm – 3:00 pm

History Session 3:  3:15 pm – 4:30 pm

Detailed Conference Program

Schedule at a Glance

Room 201/202 Room 204 Room 205 Great Hall Suite C/D
9:00-10:15am
Great Hall 1
Plenary Session — Is Utah Still the Crossroads of the West?
Speakers: Jeffrey D. Nichols (moderator), David Haward Bain, John M. Findlay, Juliette Tennert, Fred E. Woods.
The panel will examine the question in all its dimensions—in terms of the state’s geographic position but also cultural and economic influence—and whether the idea of crossroads is still a useful and accurate concept to think about Utah history and the state in the twenty-first century.
10:30-11:45am Photography, Representation, and the Transcontinental Railroad New Approaches to Utah Studies: Lightning Round The Role of Transit in Salt Lake City’s Development Highways and Roadside Culture in 20th-Century Utah Premiere: Journey to Promontory (2018)
Noon-1:30pm
Great Hall 1
Lunch (free for registered attendees)

Keynote – Living the Transcontinental Life
David Haward Bain

As author of the award-winning, much lauded Empire Express, The Old Iron Road, and other books, David Bain has written “I have always lived within the sound of a train whistle.” In the 14 years he spent researching and writing Express and the five years for Old Iron Road, he had many adventures, whether out on sunbaked routes or in the many libraries and archives he habituated. Even the publishing path was fraught with alarms. Lively anecdotes and vivid “magic lantern slides” abound in this talk about researching in the weeds, appraising the historical personalities and points of view, contending with terrible penmanship, and, as he has said, “writing and structuring history like a novelist—just not making things up!” Bain has taught writing and literature at Middlebury College in Vermont for more than 30 years, and his connection to the august Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference has been unbroken for nearly four decades.

2018 Outstanding Achievement Awards Program
Dina Blaes, Chair, Board of State History

1:45-3:00pm Refugee Movement and Boundaries: Displacement, Relocation, and Advocacy

 

Pathfinding: Transportation Solutions Moving Goods and Money Culture and Technology Promontory (2002)
3:15-4:30pm Murder and Justice: Stories of True Crime “All Out for Uncle Sam”: Movement in Northern Utah during WWII A Critical Review of The Diaries of Leonard J. Arrington (Signature Books, 2018) Cultural Threads in 19th-Century Utah Film and Storytelling

 

Detailed Conference Program

 

Saturday, September 29th

Pony Express in Utah Tour
Time: 8am to 6pm

Description:  To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the National Trails System Act, the Bureau of Land Management’s Salt Lake field office is offering an auto tour of the Pony Express National Historic Trail on National Trails Day, Saturday, September 29. During the tour, which will take place from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., BLM staff and Utah historians will guide participants across a landscape largely untouched since the trail’s creation in 1860.

The tour will begin at the Home Depot parking lot located at 222 E. 2400 North, Tooele, and return to the Wasatch Front via I-80. Numerous stops will allow participants to visit Pony Express Station ruins and view traces of the trails.

Limitations: Sign-up is limited to the first 15 cars. Backcountry travel will be on a gravel road; a well-maintained vehicle with good tires and a spare is necessary. Participants should be ready for variable weather and terrain, and include plenty of water, good sturdy shoes, a hat (for sun or shine) and other outdoor clothing! For more details contact BLM outdoor recreation planner Ray Kelsey by phone at 801-977-4300 or email at rkelsey@blm.gov.

Transcontinental Railroad Tour
Time: 800am to 600pm

Description: As we quickly approach the 150th Anniversary of the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad in 2019, the Bureau of Land Management would like to invite the public to join cultural resource staff and historians on a guided tour of some important locations in western Box Elder County. Tour will stop at the important railroad towns of Kelton and Terrace, along with some important engineering feats such as the Dove Creek Fill and Peplin Cut.

Tour will begin at the Love’s Travel Station at Snowville, Utah (just off I-15) at 800am, and will return to this location at the end of the day (around 6pm).

Limitation: Sign-up is limited to the first 10 cars. Backcountry travel will be on the historic transcontinental railroad grade, so there is a risk of flat tires from railroad spikes. Good off-road tires, medium to high-clearance vehicle and a spare is required. You are responsible for your own lunch and water. Participants should be ready for variable weather and terrain, and include plenty of water, good sturdy shoes, a hat (for sun or shine) and other outdoor clothing! For more details contact BLM archaeologist Michael Sheehan by phone at 801-977-4300 or email at msheehan@blm.gov.


 

Thank you to our generous conference sponsors!

    
                    

     
     

Registration is now closed

For general conference questions, please contact Alycia Rowley at aaldrich@utah.gov or 801-245-7226

State History – Annual Themes

Bingham_Canyon_UtahThese annual statewide themes are vetted two years in advanced by the Utah Division of State History, the Utah State Historical Society, and the editorial staff of the Utah Historical Quarterly. If you would like to recommend an annual theme, please do so by writing to statehistory@utah.gov.

The annual theme is used for our annual statewide history conference (usually held in the fall).

Themes are based on noteworthy Utah anniversaries, public history trends, and new and emerging areas of historical interest. State History highly encourages that county, local and regional historical agencies, programs, repositories and societies join us in offering conferences and programs that follow these annual themes. “Preservation and Antiquities” month events also align with the annual themes.

2016 – Rural Utah and Western Issues

2017 – Local Matters

2018 – Transportation and Movement

2019 – The Long View of History

2020 – Rights and Responsibilities