Tag Archives: utah state history

K-12 Resources

The Utah Division of State History offers high-quality educational resources designed for K-12 teachers and students that explore Utah’s rich and complex past.

History To Go – An extensive online encyclopedia on Utah history suitable for middle- and high-school students.

I Love History – Utah history for elementary students.

Interactive Story Maps – Story maps integrate history and geography to focus on how places change over time. This collection includes Contested Boundaries: Creating Utah’s State Lines, Jedediah Smith’s Southwestern Expeditions, and the buildings of Fort Douglas.

Utah Drawn: Historic Maps – This digital exhibition features six rare maps of Utah dating from 1641 through 1857, and includes classroom materials.

Utah History Day – Utah’s National History Day affiliate program engages students in extensive historical research, analysis or primary sources, and creative presentation of their findings in the form of exhibits, performances, documentary films, websites, and papers.

 

Artifacts Collection

Have you ever been in the presence of an artifact and felt transported in time? If you know their story, artifacts can become a tangible bridge to the past.
State History has over 31,000 artifacts in its collection and has implemented a new artifacts catalog to provide greater accessibility. Click on the link to begin exploring the collection and stay up to date as we add new objects.

2017 Utah State History Conference

Local Matters:
Interweaving historical threads of community

October 10–11, 2017

In 2017, we’re focusing on Local Matters—and local can be broadly defined.

Our annual conference will examine the many strands that create the fabric of communities, such as festivals, buildings, schools, or the arts.

We’ll also discuss the uses of local history and the application of sophisticated methodology to personal, family, and community history.

Workshops will focus on strategies for local organizations, oral history, historic preservation, and community histories.

Registration is now closed

Walk-ins will be accepted as space allows.  We may not be able to accommodate lunch for walk-ins. 


CONFERENCE SCHEDULE OVERVIEW

Tuesday, October 10th
8:30 am–5:00 pm
Workshops
Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City
State Archives Building, 346 South Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City

Wednesday, October 11th
7:45 am – check in and morning refreshment
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Plenary, lunchtime keynote and awards presentation, history and panel sessions
Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 West 3100 South, West Valley



DETAILED CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

Tuesday, October 10th
8:30 am–4:00 pm
Workshops
Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City
State Archives Building, 346 South Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City

Introduction to Oral History (WORKSHOP IS FULL)
Megan van Frank and Jedediah Rogers
9 am–noon, Tuesday, October 10, 2017
Zephyr Room, Rio Grande Depot
300 S. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City

Oral history is a powerful tool for people to understand their family stories and community history. Whether used for scholarly research, finding community stories, or fleshing out one’s family history, oral history provides unusual access to stories not otherwise known or in danger of being lost. This workshop will provide a focused introduction to the art and craft of oral history: to the philosophical underpinnings of the discipline—what it can, and cannot, tell us about the past—and to the nuts and bolts of executing successful oral history projects. An orientation to the Utah Humanities and Utah Division of State History joint oral history program will also be provided.

Megan van Frank directs community history and museums programming for Utah Humanities.

Jedediah Rogers is a Senior State Historian at the Utah Division of State History and co-managing editor of the Utah Historical Quarterly.

**

Community Preservation (WORKSHOP IS FULL)
Presented by SHPO staff at Division of State History
8:30 am–noon, Tuesday, October 10, 2017
Archives Training Room, State Archives Building
346 S. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City

This workshop will provide the tools and techniques for running successful local historic preservation programs, including incentives, guidelines and regulations, planning tools, partnerships, public education, and grants and tax credits. Find out whether your community is taking advantage of all resources available to it.

**

Family History Meets History (WORKSHOP IS FULL)
Holly George and Beth Taylor, CGsm
1:00 – 3:30 pm, Tuesday, October 10, 2017
Zephyr Room, Rio Grande Depot
300 S. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City

The world of family history has much to offer—both tools and stories—to the writers of history. At the same time, historical writing and genealogical work are not always the same thing.

This workshop will address
1) How to use the tools of family history research in historical writing
2) How to craft family stories into articles for journals such as Utah Historical Quarterly

Holly George, Utah Historical Quarterly.

Beth Taylor, FamilySearch International

**

National Historic Trails and the BLM: How Historic Trails Can Connect the Public to the Past (WORKSHOP IS FULL)
Rob Sweeten
1:00–2:30 pm, Tuesday, October 10, 2017
Archives Training Room, State Archives Building
346 S. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City

Rob Sweeten is BLM National Trail Administrator for the Old Spanish National Historic Trail and Historic Trails lead for BLM-Utah.

**

BLM-Utah’s Cultural Resource Program: Organization, Goals, and Highlights (WORKSHOP IS FULL)
Nate Thomas
3:00–4:00 pm, Tuesday, October 10, 2017
Archives Training Room, State Archives Building
346 S. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City

Nate Thomas is State Archaeologist and Cultural Resource Program Lead for BLM-Utah



Wednesday, October 11th

8:00 am check in and morning refreshments
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Plenary, lunchtime keynote and awards presentation, history and panel sessions
Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 West 3100 South, West Valley

Schedule at a Glance

Room 201 & 202 Room 204 Room 205 Great Hall – West Great Hall – East
9:00-10:15am
Great Hall 1
Plenary Session — Peril, Conflict, and Storytelling in Community History
Speakers: David Rich Lewis (moderator), Elizabeth Clement, Gregory Smoak, and Benjamin Pykles
10:30-11:45am Familiar Places: Glimpses of Home and Community National Institutions, Local Crises Territorial History and Its Records Cooperation and the Preservation of Historic Places Writing Regional History: Gary Topping’s Utah Historians and the Reconstruction of Western History
Noon-1:30pm
Great Hall 1
Lunch (free for registered attendees)

Keynote
Ken Verdoia
I’m not a Historian, But I Played One On TV

2017 Outstanding Achievement Awards Program
Dina Blaes, Chair, Board of State History

1:45-3:00pm Food and Culture: Daily Life in Northern Utah

 

Pedagogy in the Digital Era Historic Preservation in Salt Lake City Knowledge is Power: Education in Utah History of the Southern Paiute Tribe Restoration Act
3:15-4:30pm Cache Valley Utah Drug Court Oral History Project: A Community-Driven Effort Religion and the Community The Impact of Independent Film on Local Communities Interpreting Controversy: Preserving and Presenting the Story of Joe Hill Understanding 20th-Century Utah: James Allen’s Still the Right Place: Utah’s Second Half-Century of Statehood, 1945-1995

 


Click here for detailed session and speaker information

Registration is now closed

Walk-ins will be accepted as space allows.  We may not be able to accommodate lunch for walk-ins. 

Thank you to our generous conference sponsors!

    
    
    

Tschanz Rare Books, LLC

Detailed History Sessions “Local Matters”

Registration is now closed

Walk-ins will be accepted as space allows. We may not be able to accommodate lunch for walk-ins.

10/11/2017 Utah Cultural Celebration Center
Time Session Titles and Speakers
10:30 – 11:45am Familiar Places: Glimpses of Home and Community

Chair: Laurie Bryant, Utah Division of State History

Alan B. Barnett
There’s No Place Like Home: Named Houses in Utah

Bruce W. Worthen
Voices from a Distant Town: Community Formation in the Remote Settlements of Antebellum Utah

Clint Pumphrey
Daggett County at 100: New Approaches to a Colorful Past

National Institutions, Local Crises

Chair: Greg Davis, Department of Heritage and Arts

J. Scott Bushman
A History of Fighting Forest Fires in Northern Utah:  Local Initiatives that Contributed to National Solutions

Joseph F. Darowski
Struggling with the Three Rs: Relief, Recovery, and Reform in Utah during the Great Depression (1930–1940)

Ben Kiser
When the Army Came to Town:  WWII, the Cold War, and the Aftermath in Tooele County

  Territorial History and Its Records

Chair: Colleen Whitley

Kenneth Alford
Utah and the American Civil War: The Written Record

Richard Quartaroli
John Wesley Powell’s Explorations and Surveying of the Colorado River and Its Tributaries, 1871–1872, with the Assistance of Mormon Communities

  Cooperation and the Preservation of Historic Places

Chair: Gay Cookson, Department of Heritage and Arts

Adriane Herrick Juarez
Honoring the Past, Moving into the Future: The Renovation of the Historic Park City Library

Lisa Michele Church
The Page Ranch Story: Preserving a Local Treasure

Leighton M. Quarles
The Fort Douglas Heritage Commons: A Model of Public-Private Cooperation in Historic Preservation

Writing Regional History: Gary Topping’s Utah Historians and the Reconstruction of Western History

Gary Topping, Polly Aird, Richard Saunders, Gary Bergera, Jedediah Rogers (moderator)

Noon – 1:30pm Lunch

2017 Outstanding Achievement Awards Program
Dina Blaes, Chair Board of State History

Keynote
Ken Verdoia
I’m Not A Historian, But I Played One on TV

1:45 – 3:00pm Food and Culture: Daily Life in Northern Utah

Chair: Melissa Coy, Utah Division of State History

Darcy Pumphrey
Brigham Young College: A Case Study in LDS Education at the Turn of the Twentieth Century

Cody Patton
Beehive Brews: The Surprising Story of Beer in Utah

Lisa Barr
Local Food Producers of Cache Valley, Utah

Pedagogy in the Digital Era

Chair: Wendy Rex-Atzet, Utah Division of State History

Hadyn B. Call
The Driven 2 Teach Program: A History

Brenden Rensink, Brent Rogers, Jay H. Buckley                                                   Making Local History Digital: Intermountain Histories

Historic Preservation in Salt Lake City

Chair: Susan Rugh, Brigham Young University

William G. Hartley
One Salt Lake Landmark Saved, One Left to Disintegrate:  Nicholas G. Morgan and Architect Edward O. Anderson’s Crusade to Save the Old City Hall and Turn Pioneer Park into a Jewel

Walter Jones
Salt Lake City’s Magnificent Knutsford Hotel

Nan Weber and Allen Roberts
The Salt Lake City Building Legacy of Master Architect Richard K. A. Kletting

  Knowledge is Power: Education in Utah

Chair: Kerri Nakamura, Department of Heritage and Arts

Mervin Brewer
Echoes from the Chalkboard: Public School Buildings of the Past

Mark W. Buchanan
“School in the Other Fellows Town Seven Miles Distant”: Cache County School Consolidation, 1908

Brett D. Dowdle
“Putting Our Clutches to His Very Throat”: The Reconstruction of Education in Utah, 1867–1890

History of the Southern Paiute Tribe Restoration Act

Larry Echohawk, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; Travis Parashonts, Paiute Tribe; Dorena Martineau, Paiute Tribe; Mary Sloan (moderator), attorney

3:15 – 4:30pm Cache Valley Utah Drug Court Oral History Project: A Community-Driven Effort

Randy Williams (moderator), Jennifer Duncan, Thomas L. Willmore, Brock Alder

Religion and the Community

Chair: Nelson Knight, Department of Heritage and Arts

Alan J. Clark
“I’m Going Through”: Bringing Pentecostal Christianity to Utah

Jeffery O. Johnson
“Shaking the Tree”: The Impact of Signature Books on the Mormon Community

Jessica Nelson
Mormonism and the Negro, African Americans, and LDS Racism at Utah State University, 1960–1961

The Impact of Independent Film on Local Communities
Doug Fabrizio or Elaine Clarke (moderator), KUER, RadioWest
Patrick Hubley, Program Director, Utah Film Center
Virgina Pearce, Director, Utah Film Commission
Local Filmmakers: Tyler Measom, Film: Sons of Perdition, Jenny MacKenzie and Jorden Saxton Hackney, Jennie MacKenzie Films, Film: Dying In Vein

Interpreting Controversy: Preserving and Presenting the Story of Joe Hill

Jeremy Harmon; Jim Kichas; Quinn Rollins

Understanding 20th-Century Utah: James Allen’s Still the Right Place: Utah’s Second Half-Century of Statehood, 1945-1995

James Allen; Thomas Alexander; Brian Cannon; Michael Homer; Eric Swedin; Brad Westwood (moderator)

Registration is now closed

Walk-ins will be accepted as space allows.  We may not be able to accommodate lunch for walk-ins. 

Archaeology Publications

Are you interested in Utah Archaeology? Utah Archaeology is an annual publication of USAS, UPAC, and the Utah Division of State History. The journal focuses on prehistoric and historic archaeological research relevant to Utah.

You will also be able to view all publications related to Utah Archaeology.

Search Utah Archaeology Publications


Latinos in Utah

WE REMEMBER, WE CELEBRATE, WE BELIEVE                                         A PHOTO HISTORY OF LATINOS IN UTAH

Latinos in Utah
History of Mexico
Monticello Settlement
Miners of Utah
Railroad Workers in Utah
Religious Practices of Latinos in Utah
Migrant Workers in Utah
Utah Hispanics in the Military
Latinos’ Quest for Civil Rights in Utah
Our Future: Our Children

For twenty years, and in conjunction with our oral history project, we gathered an impressive number of pictures and documents of Latinos in the state of Utah. These pictures allowed us to recreate the history of Latinos since the time when the Aztecs and Utes inhabited Utah’s territory to our present days. Based on ethnic methodologies, I merged the history of the United States, the history of Utah, and the history of Mexican Americans in the Southwest.

Our main intention was to increase the level of awareness of the presence of Latinos in Utah, to promote tolerance and understanding in our communities, and to make this information accessible to people without formal education. For these purposes, we created a travel exhibit, with captions in English and Spanish, and with a feedback mechanism through which people provided further information. The exhibit was displayed throughout the state and about 120,000 people visited our photo-documentary.

This collection includes maps showing the territory of Utah when it was part of Mexico, the first community of Latinos in Monticello, the experience of the miners in Bingham and Price, the participation of Latinos in the construction of Utah’s railroad, the presence of Mexican migrant workers, the Latinos of Utah who enrolled in the U.S. wars abroad, the early religious organizations of Catholics and Latter Day Saints, the Chicano Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s and 1970s, and Utah’s Latino leaders who have left a legacy for future generations.

Organizations such as the Utah State Historical Society, the Center of Documentary Art, the American West Center, the Salt Lake Tribune, the Special Collections at the University of Utah, Utah Humanities, Ethnic Studies, Centro Civico Mexicano, Weber State University, the Office of Hispanic Affairs, and multiple families contributed to this project. We are confident that our involvement will enhance the goals of making Utah’s history a more wholistic and inclusive endeavor.

Armando Solorzano. Ph.D.

 

 

This was an excerpt of the panels. You can access the finding aide here.

Mesa to Mountain Symposium 2017

For More Information and Conference Registration click here.

Salt Lake City is a crossroads of the American West and abounds with historic resources and projects that will be of interest to APT members from across the country. Mesa to Mountain will explore the rich history and unique preservation challenges of this region with a focus on western sites, materials, and conditions.

The symposium kicks off on Thursday, March 23 with a plenary address and reception at the historic Alta Club. Friday begins with a keynote address, then continues with a full day of paper sessions following three tracks: Seismic Retrofit of Historic Buildings, Materials and Construction Techniques, and Cultural Heritage Management. On Saturday, three full-day tours will take participants to historic sites in the Salt Lake City area.

Utah Historical Quarterly Current Issue


Volume 85, Number 2 (Spring 2017 Issue):


Published since 1928, the Utah Historical Quarterly is the state’s premier history journal and the source for reliable, engaging Utah history. Join the Historical Society for your own copy.

Each issue of the Utah Historical Quarterly is accompanied with rich web supplements that introduce readers to sources, photos, interviews, and other engaging material. These “extras” are located at history.utah.gov/uhqextras.

WEB EXTRAS: See here 


IN THIS ISSUE


Good history—produced through a devotion to truth, examination of evidence, and evocative prose—introduces readers to a world they thought they knew. Our lead article continues
in the tradition of past issues to rethink our pioneer past, this time from the perspective of the
Redds, a slave-owning family from North Carolina. John Hardison Redd and his wife Elizabeth
owned a handful of slaves, six of whom emigrated to Utah with the family. Bound by
legal obligations and family ties, blacks in Mormon country navigated waters fraught with
prejudice and judgment. Even as power relations were unequal for slaves and black Utahns,
they attempted with varying degrees of success to integrate into a social world that was not
always friendly to them. Stories like that of the Redds present the opportunity to rethink family
and community in territorial Utah. And they implicitly challenge pioneer narratives, moving
beyond simplistic, sometimes paternalistic histories to reveal a past that is more personal and
heartbreaking than we oft-times consider.

The historian Laurel Thatcher Ulrich has spoken much about using a single object—say, a
quilt—as a doorway to understanding larger issues. In that manner, our second article
focuses on the popularity of a class of objects—the hoopskirt—to examine cultural exchange,
religious condemnation, and female agency in nineteenth-century Utah. The development
of the Bessemer process in 1856 facilitated the mass production of hoopskirts, and the fashion
reached its zenith in the mid-nineteenth: the same years when Euro Americans were arriving
in the Salt Lake Valley. Latter-day Saint women learned about the hoopskirt through
periodicals and, especially, emigrants from the states, but in their desire to be chic, they hit up
against the admonitions of religious leaders who encouraged simplicity and self-sufficiency.

Material consumption also figures into our third article, an examination of the referendum over an income tax on chain stores operating in the state. After the turn of the twentieth century, chain stores began sprouting up throughout the country, competing and in some cases
crowding out smaller local stores. This trend was pronounced in Utah, as retailers sold and
consumers bought goods available elsewhere in the United States. This is part of a larger story of
the economic and cultural integration of Utah. It is also a political one: as businesses and other
interests jockeyed to make known their views on economic freedom and rights, voters and
politicians publically debated the relative virtues of local and chain stores. The 1942 chainstore
tax referendum highlighted the divergent views over how to preserve local autonomy and
signaled the growing consumer spending that would characterize the postwar era.

Carl and Mathilda Harline emigrated from Sweden to the Salt Lake Valley in 1891. There
they raised a large family, their thirteenth child a boy—Leigh Adrian Harline—who reportedly
preferred practicing piano to playing outside. Our final article tells the story of Leigh Harline, who became one of Hollywood’s foremost composers. Harline learned his craft from J. Spencer Cornwall and teachers at Granite High School and the University of Utah; his career was helped along much by the new platforms of film and radio. The setting also mattered: after a Utah upbringing, Harline moved on to California in the late 1920s, where he enjoyed broadcast success and, critically, became an employee of Walt Disney. Yet there was a circularity to Harline’s career, for he returned to Utah to compose music commemorating his heritage.

Our final piece contextualizes military records recommending a road to a new post in the Uintah Basin named after Major Thomas Thornburgh. The establishment of a Ute reservation at Ouray, Utah, occasioned the need for the fort and road. The route as it was originally intended was short-lived, but it became a military supply corridor, and sections of it became Highway 40. Publication of these records continues a UHQ tradition: preserving documents for future scholarship.

 


ARTICLES

Redd Slave Histories: Family, Race, and Sex in Pioneer Utah
By Tonya Reiter

Hoop Mania: Fashion, Identity, and Religious Condemnation in Nineteenth-Century Utah
By Michelle Hill

Chained Stores: Utah’s First Referendum and the Battle over Local Autonomy
By Ted Moore

“When You Wish Upon a Star”: The Musical Legacy of Utah Composer Leigh Harline
By Sandra Dawn Brimhall and Dawn Retta Brimhall

The Park City to Fort Thornburgh Road
By Floyd A. O’Neil and Shauna O’Neil


BOOK REVIEWS

James Knipmeyer, Cass Hite: The Life of an Old Prospector. Reviewed by Robert S. McPherson

Dan Flores, Coyote America: A Natural and Supernatural History. Reviewed by Curtis Foxley

Don. B. Olsen, True Valor: Barney Clark and the Utah Artificial Heart. Reviewed by Eric Swedin


BOOK NOTICES

Frank Van Nuys, Varmints and Victims: Predator Control in the American West

William D. Street, edited by Warren R. Street, Twenty-Five Years among the Indians and Buffalo: A Frontier Memoir

John J. Hammond, Island Adventures: The Hawaiian Mission of Francis A. Hammond, 1851-1865

NHPA 50 Year Anniversary

Join the nationwide celebration for the 50th Anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) in 2016. This Act transformed the face of communities throughout the United States and Utah by establishing a framework and incentives to preserve historic buildings, landscapes, and archaeological sites.  Coordinated through Preservation50.org, the nationwide celebration is designed to inform and engage all ages and backgrounds in this significant law’s effects on local communities and history. Since 1966, the NHPA has shaped preservation efforts on America’s history and culture while generating positive social and economic impacts. In 2015, the Utah State Historic Preservation Office (formed in 1973) gathered stakeholders to organize a year of events and to gather engaging stories and media for the celebration.

This website is a portal to a year of events and activities that cover all corners of Utah.

Events Calendar     Media     Preservation Apps     Links     Partners

shipwreckgsl

Shipwreck at the Great Salt Lake

 

Utah Archaeology and Historic Preservation Month celebrates Utah’s rich archaeological and historical resources with a month of lectures and hands-on learning. Statewide events include:

  • Open house at the Natural History Museum of Utah with educational activities for (kids and adults
  • Hands-on experiences
  • Lectures and paper presentations
  • Tours of archaeological and historical sites

Printable version of the events calendar is available!

Please note: Updates occur regularly, but may take up to 48 hours to appear. Please note: Jumps may land slightly below their marker. We are sorry for the inconvenience.

Do you have an event? Please email cmerritt@utah.gov and fill out the Archaeology and Historic Preservation Event Form

 

Golden Spike National Historic Site

  • Transcontinental Celebration (148th Anniversary)
    Date & Time: Wednesday, May 10 (9am to 5pm)
    Location: Golden Spike National Historic Site, 32 miles west of Brigham City
    For More Information (contact info): 435-471-2209, ext 29
    Sponsors/Organizations: National Park Service

    Admission Cost: Free
    Event Description: Golden Spike National Historic Site will celebrate the 148th anniversary of the completion of the nation’s first transcontinental railroad on Wednesday, May 10th, 2017.  Events marking the May 10th occasion include the recreation of the historic “champagne photo”, a performance by Box Elder High School Band, traditional anniversary program, a re-enactment of the original 1869 ceremony, and locomotive steam demonstrations. This year’s keynote speaker will be Jimmy Chen, Professor of Computer Science & Information Systems, and Utah Advisor of Overseas Community Affairs Council, Republic of China (Taiwan). Full calendar of events can be found here: Press Release

 

CacheCounty

Logan

  • Archaeology Day
    Date & Time: Saturday, May 6 (10am to 2pm)
    Location: Museum of Anthropology, Old Main RM 252, Utah State University
    For More Information (contact info): Molly Cannon, molly.cannon@usu.edu
    Sponsors/Organizations:
    USU Museum of Anthropology
    Admission Cost: Free
    Event Description: Join the World Explorers Club at the USU Museum of Anthropology. Come explore the wonders of Archaeology with us! Try out our mini dig site, learn about major discoveries in archaeology, and hear “Tech Talks” every half hour showing off the technology used by archaeologists.

Hyrum

  • Hyrum Hydro-Electric Power Plant Tour
    Date & Time: Wednesday, May 10, 6-8pm
    Location: Blacksmith Fork Canyon
    For More Information (contact info): Jami J. Van Huss, museum@hyrumcity.com, 435-245-0208
    Sponsors/Organizations:
    Hyrum Museum
    Admission Cost: Free
    Event Description: Visit Hyrum City’s hydro-electric plant in Blacksmith Fork Canyon! Hyrum Power Superintendent Matt Draper will briefly discuss the history of electricity in Hyrum (one of Cache Valley’s first electrified cities) and the work inovlved with keeping the lights on. Come and see how water is turned into electricty.

  • Guided Tours of Historic Hyrum
    Date & Time: Saturday, May 13 (11am to 1pm)
    Location: Meet at Hyrum Museum, 50 West Main
    For More Information (contact info): Jami J. Van Huss, museum@hyrumcity.com, 435-245-0208
    Sponsors/Organizations:
    Hyrum Museum
    Admission Cost: Free
    Event Description: Guided tours of historic Hyrum will begin at 11:00 am and 1:00 pm. Meet at the museum fifteen minutes prior to your tour time. Since there is limited seating on the bus, please sign-up ahead of time at the museum. Tours will last 35–45 minutes and will be based off the Historic Tour of Hyrum, Utah booklet, which will be provided to all participants. Additional booklets will be available at the museum for those interested in driving themselves. More tour times may be added if needed.